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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 15, 2007
Crosby Healy, the owner of the new Irish pub called The Life of Reilly, was living in Miami when he purchased the location on eBay. He's never owned a restaurant before, yet there's nothing amateurish about his first attempt, which opened in December. In fact, Healy has captured the qualities of Baltimore's very best neighborhood gathering spots - the inviting interior with warm wood floors and exposed brick walls, the unbelievably good service and the effortlessly delicious food. Poor:]
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | January 17, 2007
Irish eyes are smiling in Annapolis. Local Irish pub owners predict that Martin O'Malley's presence as governor will enliven the state capital's social scene, raising spirits and boosting business. There are, after all, at least three such taverns a short walk from the governor's mansion. O'Malley has ties to the city's Irish establishments: He has been spotted sipping a Guinness at one, Galway Bay, and he learned the finer points of Irish music from the owner of another. His former band, O'Malley's March, also performed often in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | September 13, 2006
Ninth in an occasional series Make no mistake: Irish stew is not meant to be ordered as an appetizer, like its lighter soup cousins. It's a hearty meal that has sustained the Irish for centuries. "There's even a song from the 1800s about it," said Sidney Mintz, research professor at the Johns Hopkins University, who studies the history of food. "It goes, `Hurrah for Irish stew / It sticks to your belly like glue.' There was recognition that it was filling." Irish stew, or stobhach Gaelach as it is known in Gaelic, traditionally is made with lamb, potatoes, carrots, onions, herbs and seasonings.
NEWS
By REBECCA LOGAN and REBECCA LOGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2006
Restaurants and pubs popular in hip Baltimore neighborhoods are trying out suburban versions of their city-tested establishments in downtown Bel Air, but with at least one difference - spill-proof sippy cups. "When we first opened up here, we had a very limited children's menu. We didn't even have a lidded cup for the kids," said Gina Carapico, manager of the Ropewalk Tavern on Main Street. "We had spilled drinks all over the place for the first few weeks." A nightlife-seeker strolling Main Street could be forgiven for wondering why the pub lineup seems strangely similar to the big city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
Go out for a brew tomorrow and you are bound to hear this conversation at least once: "Dude, I've been drinking since 6 a.m.!" "Yeah, man, me too!" "It's only noon, and I'm exhausted!" "Yeah, man, me too!" From Guinness breakfasts to green beer and the inevitable Irish jig, St. Patrick's Day brings out the sloppy side in plenty of people. After all, it's hard not to party when there are so many options citywide. Here are some of the bigger throwdowns around, by neighborhood: With radio personalities, tons of live music and leprechaun look-alike contests, the Party on the Point starts tomorrow and also spans all day Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | January 26, 2006
Cat's Eye Pub The Cat's Eye Pub is one of the bastion bars holding their own amid an ever-changing Fells Point. No yuppie hangout can truly capture or reproduce the feel of a place like this. Where --1730 Thames St. Call --202-393-0930 Website --catseyepub.com Notable --The place has slowly evolved in true Fells Point style since owner Tony Cushing and the late Kenny Orye took over 31 years ago. "One night we had a bottle of something and knocked that down," said Cushing as he pointed to where a wall once stood.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2005
It may have been pouring rain, but inside Ryan's Daughter Irish Pub & Restaurant, stars were shining brightly. Three cast members of the movie, Rent, added pizazz to a crowd bubbling with excitement over the film's Baltimore premiere that evening. Wilson Heredia and Anthony Rapp came down from New York to support cast member Tracie Thoms, who is from here. "Family" is how Heredia and Rapp described relationships among the cast. "It's the nature of the story," Herediasaid. In fact, that "family feeling" permeated the place.
NEWS
October 28, 2005
ANNE ARUNDEL 49 West -- 49 West St., Annapolis, 410-626-9796. American. Entrees $6.75-$16.95. B, L, D daily. Adam's Ribs -- 921C Chesapeake Ave., Annapolis, 410-267-0064; 169 Mayo Road, Edgewater, 410-956-2995; 589 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., Severna Park, 410-647-5757. Barbecue and seafood. Entrees $6.95-$20.95. L, D daily. Annapolis Chart House -- 300 Second St., Annapolis, 410-269-6992. Seafood, steak and prime rib. Entrees $16-$45. D daily, B Sunday. Aqua Terra -- 164 Main St., Annapolis, 410-263-1985.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 11, 2005
You might wonder whether Baltimore really needs one more Irish pub, and you would be right to wonder. Their number is probably eclipsed only by the number of steakhouses that have appeared in the last few years. I date the area's high profile Irish pub explosion from the success of An Poitin Stil in Timonium, which opened in 1999. The new Tir Na Nog, located where the second floor of Planet Hollywood used to be, manages to differentiate itself from the rest of the pack by, well, not being terribly Irish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2005
There's a lot of history behind Baltimore's newest Irish restaurant. Maggie Moore's Irish Pub & Restaurant is set to open next week in the old Baltimore Equitable Society Building on Eutaw Street. Owner John Moore says the building was constructed in 1847 as the Eutaw Savings Bank and became headquarters in 1887 for the Equitable Society, a fire insurance company. He says he and partner Bill Carr have spent the last year renovating the 9,000-square-foot place, trying to keep as much of the building's original elements in it as they could.
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