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By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,sun reporter | October 10, 2006
Mayor Martin O'Malley and running mate Anthony G. Brown continued yesterday their Democratic campaign's strategy to tie Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to national Republicans, whose popularity has plummeted in Maryland. Despite Ehrlich's high job-approval ratings, O'Malley seized on the Iraq war and the scandal surrounding former GOP Rep. Mark Foley's improper e-mail contact with teenage boys to undercut the Republican incumbent governor's support. "When you see the appalling cover-up by the speaker of the House [of]
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NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
SALISBURY -- A Maryland National Guard sergeant from the Eastern Shore has died of wounds he received Christmas Eve when a roadside bomb went off in Iraq, becoming the first Maryland guardsman killed in combat since World War II, officials said yesterday. Michael J. McMullen, 25, who in civilian life was a firefighter and paramedic with the Salisbury Fire Department, died Tuesday at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, said Maj. Charles Kohler, a National Guard spokesman. Officials said Sergeant McMullen was one of three members of the Baltimore-based 243rd Engineer Company who were gravely wounded by roadside bombs Dec. 24. He was wounded in Ramadi when an explosive device went off as he tended to a fellow soldier who had been wounded minutes earlier in another explosion.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 2004
PANAMA CITY, Fla. -- Having called on Sen. John F. Kerry to explain his position on the Iraq war, President Bush derided Kerry's answer yesterday as disingenuous, accusing him of finding "a new nuance." The Kerry campaign responded by accusing Bush of distorting Kerry's words and resorting to desperate tactics. The exchange was the latest round in the candidates' sparring match over Iraq, an issue that repeatedly returns to center stage in the campaign. Appearing with Navy veteran and Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona at a rowdy dockside rally, Bush said the Democratic nominee portrays himself as an opponent of the war but is trying to stay on both sides of the issue.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Two high-ranking Defense Department officials denied yesterday that a special Pentagon intelligence unit manipulated information on Iraq's weapons programs and links to al-Qaida in an effort to build public and political support for war. In an unusual news conference, Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Douglas Feith and his deputy, William Luti, said the Office of Special Plans was never told to produce evidence that Saddam Hussein's regime...
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday that he ordered the release of classified information in 2003 to prove his reasons for the Iraq war were legitimate - a striking assertion for a leader who has made secrecy one of the trademarks of his administration, analysts said. Bush's account of why he declassified a July 2003 intelligence report suggests that the president, usually as unapologetic about his decisions as he is tight-lipped about the internal workings of his White House, feels the need to justify the action he took to bolster his case for the war. "His default mechanism is to do things the way he wants to and not feel a need to explain, but he's prepared to fall back now and make more modest demands," said presidential historian Fred Greenstein of Princeton University.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- John Batiste has traveled a long way in the past four years, from commanding the 1st Infantry Division in Iraq to quitting the Army after three decades in uniform, and now, from his new life overseeing a steel factory here, to openly challenging President Bush on his management of the war. "Mr. President, you did not listen," Batiste says in new television advertisements being broadcast in Republican congressional districts as part...
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
WASHINGTON // Chanting "Bring our troops home now" and "George Bush has got to go," tens of thousands of protesters descended on the White House yesterday in the largest antiwar rally here since the start of the Iraq war. A crowd, informally estimated by police at 100,000, marched through downtown Washington under a dark gray sky and occasional drizzle, toting signs, bullhorns and bongo drums to make their case against the Bush administration. The demonstration, which included a concert on the Washington Monument grounds that was scheduled to run until midnight, was largely peaceful.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
If Democrats take over one or both houses of Congress, as seems increasingly likely, next month's election might come to be seen as a turning point for the U.S. presence in Iraq. Unable for years to agree on an Iraq policy, Democrats appear to be rallying around the idea of a U.S. pullout, though exactly when and how are unclear. Republicans remain, for the most part, supportive of the administration, though even President Bush has acknowledged that the war isn't going well and has all but advertised for someone to give him a better plan.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,Sun reporter | September 23, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, facing waning public support for the Iraq war as thousands gather for peace protests here, said yesterday that an American withdrawal would allow terrorists to decare "an historic victory over the United States." Bush plans to leave town before the onset of this weekend's antiwar demonstrations. In remarks at the Pentagon, he acknowledged that "there are differences of opinion about the way forward" in Iraq. But he took issue with those pressing to bring home U.S. troops now, as demanded by organizers of the protest and those scheduled to speak, such as Cindy Sheehan, the bereaved mother-turned-peace activist.
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