Advertisement
HomeCollectionsIraq
IN THE NEWS

Iraq

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Letter writer Paul R. Schlitz Jr. can't seem to grasp the fact that an acknowledgment of Iraq's potential to harbor weapons of mass destruction doesn't necessarily indicate current agreement with the decision to invade, nor does it require someone to justify the invasion ("Explain again why we invaded Iraq?" Jan. 4). It's simply an acknowledgment of the situation. We do not invade every country that has the potential to produce WMD. I would also point out that failure to acknowledge threats is no less dangerous than inflating threats.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 11, 2014
How fine and wise it was of our nation and its military to save Europe's cultural treasures from theft and destruction by the Nazis during World War II ( "Baltimore's Monuments Men," Feb. 7). How sadly disappointing, by contrast, that George W. Bush and his generals completely overlooked the protection of the Baghdad Museum during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. This oversight led to the theft and destruction of many of civilizations oldest relics, including the oldest known examples of human writing.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 4, 2012
After two letters in attempt to justify himself and the invasion of Iraq ("Iraq's chemical weapons stocks were well documented," Dec. 28, and "Did Saddam have WMDs before the U.S. invasion in 2003?" Jan. 2) I still can't figure out what Michael DeCicco is trying to say in regard to the astonishingly stupid decision to go to invade Iraq in 2003. Clearly American citizens were in no danger from Saddam's stockpiles of chemical weapons even if they had ever been found or used on U.S. soldiers (which they weren't)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
Dan Trahey plays the tuba. He's played it all his life, and he takes his instrument with him everywhere, even though it's been years since he's performed regularly with an orchestra. Trahey's affinity for the unwieldy, decidedly uncool contraption says a lot about him. The tuba partly explains how Trahey has helped make OrchKids - the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program that puts musical instruments into the hands of schoolchildren regardless of their ability - into a national model for teaching life skills to youngsters in impoverished neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 28, 2011
In reference to The Sun's editorial regarding the removal of U.S. combat troops from Iraq ("Home for Christmas," Dec. 25) and speaking as a veteran of five years in WWII and later recalled for three more in Korea, I am in complete disagreement with President Barack Obama's political greedy, unwise and short-sighted decision in withdrawing our troops from Iraq by the end of 2011 regardless of how they got there. Instead, I strongly believe that the U.S. should have maintained a strong standing military force in Iraq just as we did and still do in Japan, Germany and South Korea to assure that democracy remains in operation for the whole world to behold.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
The Sun's most interesting editorial, "Fresh start in Iraq" (Dec. 27), stated, "It's vital that [Prime Minister Nouri] al-Maliki make good on his promise to lead a truly representative government that offers the hope of a better life for all its citizens. " But in my opinion, the U.S. is instead planning to remove that hope by withdrawing our troops from Iraq by the end of 2011. Look how long it took for our original 13 colonies to become a unified democratic country — not until after battles with other countries including England, Spain, France and Mexico and eventually leading to our Civil War. Also in order to protect our interests and advances following some of our past major wars, we still have standing armies in Japan, Germany and South Korea to assure the safety operation of their democratic governments and to prevent invasion by their aggressive neighbors.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
In response to Quinton D. Thompson's letter ("Obama's decision to leave Iraq led to catastrophe," April 5), I must remind your readers that the underlying catastrophe was perpetrated by then-President George W. Bush's illegal attack on Iraq. President Bush led this attack on the false pretenses that Saddam Hussein was harboring weapons of mass destruction that posed an imminent threat to our nation. It was Mr. Bush's irresponsible decision to take this action that led to thousands of U.S. soldiers dead or wounded (not to mention the innumerable Iraqi civilian casualties)
NEWS
By John A. McCary | March 18, 2010
T he Lesson Holds: What Tribal Engagement in Iraq Can Teach Us about Winning Allies in Afghanistan The Iraqi parliamentary elections last week highlight one very important lesson about tribal engagement in counterinsurgencies: It works. Voter turnout in Sunni tribal provinces such as Anbar and Diyala - formerly hotbeds of the insurgency - topped out at 70 percent. Among the long list of newly formed political parties vying for seats in parliament, more than a few boasted openly tribal affiliations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
A Maryland soldier died Thursday in Iraq, the U.S. Department of Defense said. Sgt. John F. Burner III, 32, of Baltimore, who was based at Fort Gordon, Ga., died as a result of a medical condition in Iskandariya, Iraq, said fort spokesman Buz Yarnell. He was not killed in combat. Sergeant Burner's unit, the 63rd Signal Battalion (Expeditionary), 35th Signal Brigade, deployed Aug. 21, Yarnell said. He said Sergeant Burner was survived by his wife and two daughters, ages 6 and 2, who live in Grovetown, Ga., near the base.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Dorothy Lee says it will be good to get her grandson back home from Iraq. But the Havre de Grace woman will believe it when she sees him. In the months since Pfc. Christopher Hine left for Contingency Operating Base Adder in southern Iraq, Lee has heard conflicting information about when the Maryland National Guard member will return. To her, the announcement Friday by President Barack Obama that all U.S. troops are to be withdrawn by the end of the year was just another potentially erroneous report.
NEWS
By Anhvinh Doanvo | January 20, 2014
Iraqi insurgents kicked off 2014 with fireworks in Fallujah and Ramadi where Sunni militants - part of an al Qaida group active in Syria, according to news accounts - burned police stations, freed prisoners and occupied mosques. The militants fought under the banner of ISIS, or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. ISIS was originally formed to induce a withdrawal of coalition forces in Iraq, suppress Shiite populations and establish an Islamic state. The group was first known as "Al-Qaeda in Iraq," after pledging allegiance to the terrorist organization in 2004.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
The aggressive civil strife occurring in Iraq among the various sects, particularly the Sunnis and Shiites as related in The Baltimore Sun ("Distrust hurts U.S.-Iraq fight against al-Qaida," Jan. 5), supports my observation that the greatest mistake President Barack Obama has ever made in his Middle East policy was to withdraw our troops from Iraq at the end of 2011. Sadly, this was nothing more than an obvious political ploy to enhance his chances of being re-elected in 2012. It eliminated all avenues for the development of a democratic country in the Middle East from which our association with the surrounding countries would have become far more peaceful and productive.
NEWS
By W.J. Hennigan, Tribune Newspapers | November 20, 2013
The A-10 Thunderbolt II, a snub-nosed ground-attack plane that the Maryland Air National Guard has flown in Iraq and Afghanistan, is the latest aircraft to find its way onto the Pentagon's endangered weapons list. Outfitted with a seven-barrel Gatling gun the size of a Volkswagen Beetle in its nose, the Cold War-era plane has a reputation for tearing apart armored tanks and clearing the way for troops on the ground with its massive 30-millimeter rounds of ammunition. But the unsightly plane - it's nicknamed the Warthog - has been in the cross hairs of Pentagon officials in recent years.
NEWS
By Thomas Cantwell | October 28, 2013
In 2003, I served as a senior military officer at Camp Ashraf, Iraq. In keeping with my responsibility as an oath-bound Army officer and under the Geneva Convention, I made a solemn promise to the group of 3,000 Iranian dissidents living there. I assumed U.S. Army responsibility for the security of these people, who were living in fear of being hunted by the Iranian regime and its allied Shiia death squads in Iraq. Initially considered "terrorists," the dissidents were detained, disarmed, confined, subjected to military intelligence and FBI screening and ultimately guaranteed protected persons status under the Geneva Convention.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Regarding Ian Livingston and Michael O'Hanlon's recent commentary on Iraq, I think it's important to provide readers with some additional background information ( "In bloody Iraq, not all hope is lost," Oct. 13). First, the authors stated that the combat troops associated with the war effort had left Iraq, when in fact they didn't just leave. Instead, they were withdrawn and sent home at the end of 2011 by President Barack Obama in an obvious political ploy to enhance his chances of being reelected in 2012.
NEWS
By Ian Livingston and Michael O'Hanlon | October 13, 2013
Nearly two years have passed since the last U.S. combat troops associated with the war effort left Iraq. And on balance, it has been a very difficult two years, with a substantial increase in violence and much worse relations across Sunni-Shia lines than at any time since before the surge of 2007/2008. That said, there is reason for hope in Iraq - though it will require substantially better decision-making by Iraqi politicians than has been witnessed in the recent past. Three chief factors account for the reversals in Iraq.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
Nobody except Bob Hope came over to Vietnam when I was there in '67-'68. I thank Gov. Martin O'Malley for going in harm's way to see the troops from Maryland ("Lt. Gov. Brown defends O'Malley's trip to Iraq," Mar. 2). Things can happen on these trips. William R. Bonnett Send letters to the editor to talkback@baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
By Justin George, John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
John Johnson could have retired from the Washington Navy Yard years ago, but he loved the work. Richard Michael Ridgell, a former Maryland state trooper who helped train police in Iraq, was devoted to his daughters. Vishnu Pandit, who came to the United States to build a better life for his family, was proud of his quarter-century working for the U.S. Navy. All were gunned down Monday in one of the worst mass killings ever on a U.S. military installation. As investigators continued Tuesday to sift clues into the motivations of alleged shooter Aaron Alexis, details began to emerge of the women and men authorities say he shot to death.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Gail Householder seems quite irritated at David Zurawik asserting that George W. Bush and Richard Cheney lied and made up Iraq mass destruction weapons (" 'Phony' scandals Aug 28). I must praise him for being correct and as smart as Secretary of State John Kerry ("U.S. makes case for Syria strike," Aug. 30). I would invite any conservative to learn facts and keep an open mind, because useless faith is currently ruining Republican states. Democrats don't want to lie like Republicans to help military supply corporations make huge profits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.