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NEWS
November 25, 2013
The big foreign policy story over the weekend was the Obama administration's agreement, along with five other nations, of a sweeping arms deal with Iran that involved Iran agreeing to a freeze of its nuclear program in exchange for relief from U.S. sanctions and the ability to sell some of its oil on the international market. There's one small problem with the administration's deal: it just made war in the Middle East more, not less, likely. The deal, as it stands now, is merely a temporary freeze.
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NEWS
November 10, 2013
Once again, intense negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program have failed to produce a deal, but there remains some reason for optimism after the weekend's high-level negotiations in Geneva. The last time such talks fell apart, the issue had been the unwillingness of Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to approve an agreement forged by then-President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. This time, the disagreement was among the United States and its allies about what kind of terms were acceptable, and that suggests the possibility for progress under Iran's new and relatively moderate President Hasan Rowhani is real, if still difficult.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
Contrary to your editorial, the present leaders of Iran, with their more moderate talk, are not sending "mixed signals" but merely confirming their long-term agenda while simultaneously lobbying for the lifting of sanctions ("Iran's mixed signals," Oct. 21). Iran has not deviated one iota from its nuclear and missile program during the current negotiations, now temporarily postponed. Iran's objective has been clear from the start of the purported warm-up - namely, to reduce pressure on its economy and continue its nuclear program without interference now that Israel is unable to respond while negotiations continue.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Two LGBT-focused films screening at the Creative Alliance over the next two weeks provide deeper looks at often-marginalized parts of the queer community -- with one exploring Maryland in particular. On Thursday night, director Tina Gharavi's " I Am Nasrine " is located at the intersection of immigration and sexuality, providing a look at what it means to struggle with both one's national identity and sexual orientation. The movie, part of which was filmed clandestinely in Iran, follows the stories of siblings Nasrine and Ali as they leave Iran to start new lives in the U.K. As the pair get their bearings in a foreign nation whose attitude toward immigrants is often, uh, less-than-enlightened, Ali also grapples with his emerging sexuality.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
To all those who sincerely believe they are being virtuous and standing up for the principles of smaller government, I ask you to examine two recent events that indicates that you are being used. The first example is the National Rifle Association claiming to represent the law-abiding gun owner. Balderdash! Any credence given to the NRA's claim was "shot in the head" by their response to a treaty recently agreed to by the U.S. government. Their response demonstrates that they only represent the gun manufacturers' desire to sell more guns.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
President Barack Obama's critics lost no time in calling him naive for welcoming talks offered by Iran's president aimed at reducing tensions between their two countries over Tehran's disputed nuclear program. Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu was outspoken in his disdain for the diplomatic initiative launched at the United Nations last month by Iranian President Hasan Rowhani, calling him a wolf in sheep's clothing who only wants to bargain in order to buy more time for Iran to build a bomb.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
Evidently the writer of the recent letter heralding a conversation between top diplomats ( "Talks with Iran a promising development," Sept. 25) has been taken in by the softened diplomatic rhetoric of President Hasan Rowhani of Iran, which has contrasted sharply with that of his predecessor. However, despite the more moderate tone of President Rowhani's speech at the United Nations, a careful examination of its contents shows that the Iranian agenda remains the same, namely attaining nuclear bomb and long-range missile capability as soon as possible and characterizing the U.S. and our allies as the perpetrators of terror while Iran is the innocent party.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 26, 2013
Washington is preoccupied with two all-consuming debates right now. First, of course, is Syria. President Barack Obama placed his faith in two wholly untrustworthy figures. Syrian President Bashar Assad has shown himself to be a consummate liar, and Russian President Vladimir Putin's overarching goals on Syria are to protect Mr. Assad and show up the United States. Meantime, Democrats and Republicans are locked in ever more hostile arguments over the price that right-wing zealots are trying to exact to pass the annual budget and extend the debt ceiling.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
Secretary of State John Kerry's meeting with Iran's foreign minister ("Kerry to meet Iran's foreign minister at UN in first face-to-face talks since 1979," Sept. 23) represents a good first step for direct negotiations between the U.S. and Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests. Hopefully, President Barack Obama will also meet with the new Iranian president, Hasan Rowhani, who has been reaching out to the West since entering office. It is past time for the U.S. to stop allowing Israel and its powerful lobby to dictate our foreign policy, which has caused us so much harm and expense.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
At long last, some diplomatic common sense! It's good news for America and the world that a meeting will take place between Secretary of State John Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif ("Obama pledges diplomacy with Iran, puts onus on Rouhani," Sept. 24). There may be an Islamic fundamentalist jihad against the West, and we've been told many times Iran is the leader of this religious war. But even if it is true, cutting off all communication is not the way to go. Even during the coldest days of the Cold War, this country never closed all doors to negotiations.
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