Advertisement
HomeCollectionsIran
IN THE NEWS

Iran

NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | June 28, 1995
Atlanta -- Common sense has always been in short supply in the Clinton administration's formulation of foreign policy, and nowhere is this more evident than in its new policy toward Iran. Oblivious of the realities of nuclear proliferation and of change inside Iran, the administration has embarked on a futile attempt to isolate an Iran whose capacity and will to threaten vital Western interests it has grossly inflated.In April, after declaring Iran an outlaw state steeped in terrorism and lust for nuclear weapons, the administration imposed a full trade embargo on it and urged U.S. allies to follow suit.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 28, 1998
TEHRAN, Iran -- On a shelf in Shirin Ebadi's office stands a black and white photograph of Arian Golshani.A black mourning sash is tacked to a corner of the photo.She didn't look so angelic when she died last year at age 9, a child beaten to death.Her hair had been hacked off, her face was swollen into a hideous mask, her body scarred from cigarette burns.She died in a Tehran hospital two days after the last beating.Her father, stepmother and 18-year-old stepbrother were convicted of the murder.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
A unilateral American military attack on Iran would cause incalculable harm to the United States. It would leave the U.S. isolated among the world's nations, it would expose American troops to far greater violence, and it would lay the groundwork for a severe constitutional crisis between the executive branch and an aroused Congress. Any sensible person can see that, yet the Bush administration seems intent on provoking Iran, with hostile rhetoric, the assignment of an aircraft carrier group to the waters near Iran, and - as reported Friday by The Washington Post - a new policy of killing Iranian agents found to be aiding militias in Iraq.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
When the Bush administration offered this week to talk directly with Iran over Tehran's refusal to abandon its nuclear program, it renewed a chance to settle this matter peacefully. The U.S. involvement also helped forge a strong new package of incentives that has the support of the major international players, including China and Russia. That should get Iran's attention. The invitation to talk comes with a condition - the Iranians must halt all nuclear activity - that the Iranians can't cavalierly dismiss.
NEWS
By Ray Takeyh | June 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - After much consideration, the Bush administration has finally opted for a strategy to deal with Iran's nuclear aspirations. As with its predecessor, the Bush team seems to hope that prodding Russia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) into pressuring Iran can obstruct Tehran's proliferation tendencies. While this approach had merit in the 1990s, it's unlikely to work today. On the surface, Washington's recent diplomatic maneuvers may seem promising. An IAEA report notes that Iran has failed to abide by its treaty obligations in not accounting for the uranium that it obtained from China in 1991.
NEWS
May 4, 2006
As the United States and its European allies rallied yesterday behind a U.N. resolution that could lead to sanctions against Iran, Tehran was busy enriching uranium, heralding its efforts and upping its threats. The Iranians don't seem the least bit fazed by the tough talk of U.S. officials and others who demand that Tehran shut down its nuclear program or face mandatory economic and diplomatic sanctions. And why should they be? For sanctions to be effective, the U.S. needs the support of U.N. Security Council members Russia and China, and neither has been willing to go that far. But the council can't simply ignore Tehran's defiance of its call to stop nuclear activities.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
The fast and loose talk being thrown around by the Israelis, the administration and the Romney camp about drawing lines in the sand for Iran to cross should be very worrisome to all Americans. All parties mentioned above share the imperative that Iran should not have a nuclear weapon, but getting there is the problem. The Israelis and Mitt Romney embrace the line in the sand approach; if the line is crossed, a military attack will be imminent. The consequences of this approach can be very troubling.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
The Democratic congressional candidates in Maryland's 6th District largely agree on major issues facing the country: They all favor immigration reform, more infrastructure spending to help boost the economy and a woman's right to have an abortion. But despite broadly similar positions, a few subtle differences emerged at a forum in Gaithersburg on Sunday, where several hundred voters turned out to hear the five candidates speak. They offered different answers on how to handle Iran, for instance, and what should be done to address ethical lapses in Washington.
NEWS
May 2, 1995
Economic warfare rarely works as intended. President Clinton may not expect his boycott of trade and investment with Iran to modify that country's international conduct. As an executive order, it has the virtue of heading off legislation to the same effect sponsored by Sen. Alfonse D'Amato, R-N.Y., which would be more rigid.The behavior of Iran that the president wants modified is crystal clear. Administration spokesmen have spelled it out, sometimes varying the order, but never the content: (1)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.