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By Louis Galambos | January 18, 2010
I srael will not be complicit in a second Holocaust. If Iran or any other nation that has called for the destruction of Israel is about to acquire nuclear weapons, the Israelis will attempt to destroy that nation's uranium-enrichment facilities. In June 1981, Israel launched a successful air attack on an Iraqi nuclear reactor, and in 2007 it bombed a Syrian factory suspected of producing plutonium warheads. But Americans should be aware that when Iran becomes the next target, it will be a blow to the U.S. economic recovery.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A Parkville man was convicted Monday of conspiring to ship industrial components to Iran in violation of the U.S. trade embargo on that country, the U.S. attorney's office announced. After a two-week trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, a jury found Ali Saboonchi, 34, guilty of one count of conspiracy and seven counts of illegally transporting U.S.-manufactured goods and services to Iran, the federal prosecutor's office said. The United States has outlawed commerce with Iran since 1995.
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NEWS
October 25, 2013
Contrary to your editorial, the present leaders of Iran, with their more moderate talk, are not sending "mixed signals" but merely confirming their long-term agenda while simultaneously lobbying for the lifting of sanctions ("Iran's mixed signals," Oct. 21). Iran has not deviated one iota from its nuclear and missile program during the current negotiations, now temporarily postponed. Iran's objective has been clear from the start of the purported warm-up - namely, to reduce pressure on its economy and continue its nuclear program without interference now that Israel is unable to respond while negotiations continue.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
President Barack Obama and officials in Iran have suggested that they will extend current talks about the Islamic State's nuclear program beyond Sunday's deadline if no agreement is reached. It is essential that they do so and that hard-line voices on both sides continue to give negotiators the space they need to find a mutually acceptable deal that offers long-term assurances that Iran will not and cannot develop nuclear weapons. When the Obama administration agreed to the framework for talks, critics in Congress and in the administration of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called it a terrible mistake.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 4, 2012
One of several casualties of the vitriolic name-calling between Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich is what to do about Iran. In interviews, Mr. Romney has spoken about tougher sanctions, but it's been difficult to consider the candidates' positions on Iran -- or much else -- with the childish talk about who is the bigger liar. James Clapper, director of national intelligence, testified Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Mr. Clapper said that while American sanctions are likely to have a greater impact on Iran's nuclear program, they are not expected to lead to the demise of Iran's leadership.
NEWS
November 30, 2013
We provided North Korea with the technology and materials to build nuclear plants for energy only, they promised not to build a bomb. They have tested seven bombs and have more. Now they are building ICBMs. Now, Iran says if we lift some sanctions, they will talk to the U.N. about not trying to make bombs. After top secret talks between the U.S. and Iran, the Obama administration went public with planned talks with the U.N. and Iran. The reason our talks were secret is we haven't had normal relations since they stormed our embassy and held our citizens hostage for 444 days.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
The big foreign policy story over the weekend was the Obama administration's agreement, along with five other nations, of a sweeping arms deal with Iran that involved Iran agreeing to a freeze of its nuclear program in exchange for relief from U.S. sanctions and the ability to sell some of its oil on the international market. There's one small problem with the administration's deal: it just made war in the Middle East more, not less, likely. The deal, as it stands now, is merely a temporary freeze.
NEWS
August 26, 2012
Can anyone explain to me why it is OK for Israel to have a nuclear capability and not Iran ("Iran nuclear advances seen," Aug. 24)? Iran has never attacked its neighbors (other than the US-fostered war with Iraq); Israel has attacked all its neighbors and still illegally holds territory in Syria and Lebanon, not to mention Palestine. Israel has actually threatened to use its nuclear power, in its 1973 war with Egypt. Israel admits that Iran, even if it had a nuclear bomb, would not be foolish enough to use it against Israel.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
Evidently the writer of the recent letter heralding a conversation between top diplomats ( "Talks with Iran a promising development," Sept. 25) has been taken in by the softened diplomatic rhetoric of President Hasan Rowhani of Iran, which has contrasted sharply with that of his predecessor. However, despite the more moderate tone of President Rowhani's speech at the United Nations, a careful examination of its contents shows that the Iranian agenda remains the same, namely attaining nuclear bomb and long-range missile capability as soon as possible and characterizing the U.S. and our allies as the perpetrators of terror while Iran is the innocent party.
NEWS
September 3, 2012
An attack on Iran would be foolhardy and unnecessary ("As rhetoric heats up over Iran, so do preparations," Aug. 30). Iran is a "non-nuclear weapon" party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, and Iran's nuclear materials and facilities such as reactors are under full-time surveillance by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). There are two paths to a first-generation nuclear weapon. An "implosion" weapon can use either plutonium or highly-enriched uranium, but is fiendishly complicated to engineer and would require a test explosion for a semblance of reliability.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The recent commentary, "An enemy revisited" (July 13), correctly states that in witnessing the harsh realities "the United States would do well to reassess its view on Iran. " In fact, we should have a dialogue and trade with Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and The Business Roundtable have both called for an end to sanctions on Iran, stating that these sanctions have cost U.S. businesses $25 billion and a loss of 210,000 American jobs.
NEWS
By Kevin Schwartz | July 13, 2014
With the meteoric rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the United States and Iran find themselves in the peculiar position of seeing their strategic goals fall into step. It is in the interest of neither country to witness the emergence of an unstable Iraq, least of all one that serves as a safe haven for Sunni extremists to harass Iranian and American interests in the region. The alignment of American and Iranian strategic interests, which last significantly occurred with the unseating of the Taliban in 2001, should not merely be viewed as a fleeting moment in which coordination - or even cooperation - between the two countries is possible.
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | March 14, 2014
Six months ago, President Barack Obama, speaking at the United Nations, stated that the three primary priorities for his administration were the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, Iran and Syria. With visits this month from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, continuing negotiations on a final nuclear agreement with Iran, and the apparent collapse of the U.S. attempt to work out a political settlement to the war in Syria last month, the time has come for a preliminary evaluation of U.S. policy in the three areas.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. trots out New York Sen. Chuck Schumer's opposition to the president's Iran policy as the latest on why the Obama administration is wrong on everything else ( "Schumer's Iran-deal criticism is rare break with Obama," Jan. 19). Mr. Ehrlich forgot to mention that Senator Schumer's co-sponsor on tougher Iran sanctions was none other than fellow Democrat Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. It's not unusual for Democrats to embrace a broad spectrum of opinion - unlike Republicans, who expect everyone in their party to act in lock step, as was the case in their repeated efforts to block the Affordable Care Act. The Menendez-Schumer effort will likely fail, as it should.
NEWS
By Sanford Gottlieb and Daryl G. Kimball | January 23, 2014
Iran began taking verifiable steps this week to stop work on its most worrisome nuclear activities under the terms of an agreement with the United States and five other world powers. The breakthrough nuclear deal marks the first negotiated limitations on Iran's nuclear program in nearly a decade and opens the door for talks on a comprehensive agreement to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran. As long as Iran complies with the limits on its program, the P5+1 group (China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States)
NEWS
January 22, 2014
The column "Schumer's Iran-deal criticism is rare break with Obama" (Jan.19) by former Maryland Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. ignores the real reason why U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer opposes the nuclear peace deal between the West and Iran. Mr. Schumer has always had dual loyalty between the U.S. and Israel and was referred to by former Sen. Ernest Hollings as "the senator from Israel. " Mr. Schumer also stated that his name in Hebrew meant gatekeeper, and he prides himself on being Israel's gatekeeper in the Senate.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi's five steps for dealing with Iran are steps to confrontation disguised as an alternative to war ("Five steps to isolate Iran," Dec. 6). Sanctions are self-evidently counter-productive as a means to stop or alter Iran's nuclear research and development when the motive behind sanctions is punishment or regime change. The premise of the sanctions - that the problem is with Iran exclusively - ignores the nuclear neighborhood that Iran lives in and our own desire to dominate the region.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
In his recent commentary, Jay Bernstein wants the Maryland authorities to maintain a restrictive policy warning shippers that "if you trade with Iran, you can't trade here" ("Keep up the pressure on Iran," June 21). But the principles of free trade and the rules of the World Trade Organization are very clear: Shippers who conduct perfectly legitimate trade with Iran, some of whom supply humanitarian supplies of food and medicine, cannot be penalized and told they can't do business in Maryland or any other U.S state.
NEWS
January 4, 2014
While reading the summary of key 2013 events, when I got to the description that "Syria blinked," I had to blink myself. I assume the writer meant "Syria winked. " At least that's about as much attention as Bashar al-Assad paid to President Barack Obama's red lines - or maybe they were dotted lines free to cross if you doubted any serious consequences. When mounting evidence no longer permitted President Obama to avoid some response, he deftly pirouetted to Congress, asking unnecessary permission to take action ("Atypical images of war," Jan. 2)
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
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