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NEWS
April 28, 2002
A memorial Mass was offered Friday at St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church in Cockeysville for John L. Critcher, a retired engineer and inventor who died Monday of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 73. Mr. Critcher retired in 1990 from manufacturer AAI Corp. in Cockeysville, where he had worked for more than 30 years in its munitions unit. Born in Lynchburg, Va., and raised in East Baltimore, he was a graduate of parochial schools. He also attended the Maryland Institute, College of Art. He served in naval aviation from 1948 until 1956 as a ground crew instructor and an inspector.
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NEWS
By Jill Zarend-Kubatko, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Remember those kids from elementary school who were perpetually building thingamajigs with Legos or erector sets? They grew up to be tinkerers and inventors. Unfortunately, some of them discovered it's not exactly practical to keep a small car in the living room, a robot in the kitchen or a bandsaw in the bedroom. So many of them have turned to hackerspaces — like mega basement workshops but with camaraderie and tons of high-tech equipment. Baltimore Hackerspace, a nonprofit in the industrial part of East Baltimore, allows its members an unconventional way of learning, sharing and inventing.
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NEWS
March 11, 2005
Elliott J. Muti, a designer and inventor, died of lung disease March 4 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Highlandtown resident was 65. Mr. Muti was born and raised in Cosenza, Italy, and graduated from a surveying school. In 1962, he immigrated to Baltimore, and later earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Baltimore. Since 1989, he worked as a designer at Whiteman, Requardt & Associates, a Baltimore engineering company. "He held three patents on topographic instruments," said a son, Thomas G. Muti of Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Robert E. Fischell | May 14, 2013
Government leaders are asking us to out-innovate, out-export and out-work our competitors in order for the United States to turn this economy around. But what if our own government was instituting policies that proved to be some of the biggest obstacles in achieving those goals? For more than four decades, I have dedicated my life to developing novel medical technologies, such as implantable insulin pumps, rechargeable implantable pacemakers, heart stents and more. These therapies have improved the health and saved the lives of millions of patients in America and throughout the world, and spurred the creation of tens of thousands of jobs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Floyd Barnes Jr., a Baltimore inventor who also owned a graphic arts business, died of cancer Saturday at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 76. Mr. Barnes was born and raised in Portsmouth, Va. After serving for two years in the Army, he studied physics at what is now Morgan State University. He then held a variety of jobs that included working as an electronics mechanic for the Coast Guard and clerk for the U.S. Treasury Department, Social Security Administration and Baltimore post office, leaving in 1971 to become as a full-time inventor.
NEWS
May 14, 1994
Henry F. Fones, who stormed ashore with the 4th Marine Division at Iwo Jima and Saipan during World War II and went on to make his mark as an inventor, died April 28 of complications from a broken hip at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Baltimore. He was 76.He enlisted in the Marine Corps when he was 16 and received a deferment to attend Georgetown University, where he met Lena Wyatt, a secretary at the university. They were married in 1937. She died in 1984.He received orders to report for duty in the days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and was sent to the South Pacific.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | November 14, 1990
Dr. Yoshiro NakaMats set his invention on the table, but it was not grand -- just a little silver motor that neither sputtered nor purred.Yet this little motor, claimed its inventor, runs on water, can power a compact car and will, if anybody gives it a chance, eliminate the world's dependence on oil and reduce air pollution and global warming and, in the end, save consumers millions of dollars and preserve the planet for our children.NakaMats, who also claims to hold more patents than anyone in history, showed off his latest invention, the engine that runs on water, in Baltimore yesterday during a press conference on the 20th floor of the World Trade Center next to the harbor downtown.
NEWS
By NICHOLAS SHIELDS and NICHOLAS SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Irwin R. Barr, an inventor of military weapons and the co-founder of Hunt Valley-based AAI Corp., died at Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville on Monday of a heart ailment. He was 85. Mr. Barr was born in Newburgh, N.Y., and from 1938 to 1940 attended what is now the Academy of Aeronautics in Newark, N.J. He worked as an engineer for the Glenn L. Martin Co. from 1940 to 1944 and returned to the company in 1946 after serving in the U.S. Army Air Forces. In 1950, he left Glenn L. Martin and helped co-found Aircraft Armaments Inc., now AAI, a Hunt Valley-based company that has more than 2,000 employees and annual sales of more than $350 million.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Walter Dandy was not a typical kid. On the high school football team, he once scored for the opponent. In college, he was excused from Spanish class, so hapless were his language skills. And then there were the flashes -- an explosion of an idea, fully crystallized.These are the epiphanies of inventor Walter Edward Dandy III of Baltimore, whose grandfather designed the protective baseball helmet and whose forebears created Ellicott City out of 18th-century wilderness.Mr. Dandy's latest innovation is called "Constant-Force Articulated Dynamic Struts," or CADS.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
William C. Hough, a retired vice president of American Bank Stationery Co. and an inventor, died Thursday at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury of pneumonia. The Salisbury resident was 92. At age 17, he began working for American Bank Stationery Co. He started in the office in Baltimore in 1927, became a salesman in New York, and worked his way up until he retired as a vice president in 1975. "He said at one time he'd sold checks to all the banks on Long Island," said a son, Coles Terry Hough of Ocean City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Stephen R. Krause, a software designer and inventor, died Friday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital from respiratory failure on his 76th birthday. Mr. Krause was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. He was a 1955 graduate of Park School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park. Since he was a child, Mr. Krause demonstrated a profound interest in electricity and electric devices. He designed an automatic inventory control system that he called Epic for his father's uniform business.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
Aspects of recent debates about the value of a liberal arts education, its usefulness and its appropriateness strike a familiar and disturbing historical chord. Our nation's brightest students, contemplating the dedication of four years to the highest level of cognitive challenge, are discouraged by a contingent of their elders and asked to consider something more practical. "A liberal education won't prepare you for a job," the student is told. "What can you do with a degree in philosophy?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Clare Fischer | November 16, 2012
The team who created FastStitch, a surgical tool designed to quickly and cost-effectively close abdominal incisions after surgeries , has won the 2012 Collegiate Inventors Competition. Their first-place award will give the team $12,500, and their faculty adviser, Robert Allen, will receive an additional $4,000. FastStitch has already won more than $90,000 in grants and prizes and is shopping their product to venture capitalists via their start-up company, Archon Medical Technologies . Team member Daniel Peng said this was the most distinguished panel of judges the team had ever faced, including the inventors of angioplasty, a technique to widen arteries, and the first defibrillator, which shocks irregular hearts back into a normal rhythm.  "It was very humbling because all the teams there were very talented," Peng said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
Leonard A. Skovira, who established three area dry-cleaning establishments and was also an inventor, died May 13 of cancer at his Parkville home. He was 94. Mr. Skovira was born and raised in Jessup, Pa., where he graduated in 1936 from Jessup High School. After high school, he served in the Pennsylvania National Guard and the merchant marine and then took a job in New York City working at Child's Restaurants, first as a busboy and then as a waiter and bartender. With the outbreak of World War II, Mr. Skovira moved to Baltimore and went to work on the assembly line of the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River, building Martin B-26 Marauder bombers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
William Magruder Waters, a retired Johns Hopkins and Navy electrical engineer and inventor who built his own car and held patents related to radar imaging, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 17 at Renaissance Gardens at Oak Crest Village. He was 86. The son of Methodist missionaries, he was born in Kobe, Japan. He came to the U.S. when his father accepted a ministerial assignment in Roanoke, Va. He later lived in Gambrills, Harmans and Goldsboro, and was a 1943 graduate of Beall High School in Frostburg.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
While the name John Gilbert Collison Sr. has been largely forgotten today, his invention of the artificial steel hip ball more than 60 years ago has given him orthopedic immortality. His invention, manufactured in Baltimore in his Falls Road facility, has saved lives and given relief and hope to patients worldwide who suffered from fractured hips or severe arthritis. At a time when a fractured hip was almost a certain death sentence, his revolutionary invention gave people hope and the ability that they would regain and live normal, pain-free lives.
NEWS
By Luther Young | November 14, 1990
In the end, state officials were asked to take it on faith that the little machine in front of them -- looking for all the world like a chrome-plated tennis ball can -- was really an engine that runs on water.That's the controversial claim of its inventor, Yoshiro Nakamatsu, known as "Dr. NakaMats" and "The Thomas Edison of Japan" for his more than 2,300 patents, an Old World gentleman and media-savvy entrepreneur in town yesterday to line up development funding for the engine.And it was the duty of J. Randall Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, to be there on "Dr. NakaMats Day" -- as declared by Gov. William Donald Schaefer -- and listen politely as the eccentric inventor disclosed virtually nothing about his "solution for mankind."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Alexander Severinsky thought he had escaped long waits for basic goods when his family fled the Soviet Union in 1978. But barely a year later he found himself in his Oldsmobile Cutlass, in the Texas heat, at the end of a line of cars waiting to gas up. "I just came from Russia a year ago, where I stand in lines for food, and now what changed? I'm back in line, only for fuel," he said, laughing, in his accented English. Better fuel efficiency, he reasoned, could boost gas supplies and end the lines.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Thomas Townsend "Townie" Hoen, who was the last president of the noted Baltimore lithographic firm of A. Hoen & Co. and inventor of the Plimpton Ball, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Owings Mills home. He was 76. The son of a neurosurgeon and a homemaker, Mr. Hoen was born in Montreal, Quebec, and raised in Cedarhurst, N.Y. After graduating in 1952 from Kent School in Kent, Conn., he attended Le Rosey in Rolle, Switzerland, for a year. He was a 1957 graduate of Middlebury College and served in Army intelligence at Fort Holabird and in Rochester, N.Y. He settled in Baltimore in 1960 and went to work for A. Hoen & Co., which had been founded in Baltimore in 1835, becoming its president six years later.
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