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Invasive Species

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NEWS
March 2, 2013
I am compelled to respond to George Fenwick's commentary ("The destructive invasive species purring on your lap," Feb. 26). He cites recent studies suggesting very high bird and mammal deaths due to outdoor cats. He then goes on to propose a Draconian solution that could accurately be described as a cat witch hunt. I do acknowledge the problem, particularly with feral cats (free-roaming, unowned). But Dr. Fenwick's attempt to demonize cats by use of terms like "invasive species," "invaders," "introduced predator," and "slaughter" invests his thesis with a hysteria usually reserved for al-Qaida sightings.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Fishing with my nephew made me wonder - would bait worms be good to add to my garden? No! We think of earthworms as good, but some species can be very destructive. The latest non-native worm to establish itself in several states is the crazy snakeworm. Fortunately, it's not in Maryland - we don't want that nightmare here. The crazy snakeworm voraciously consumes the upper organic soil layer or mulch and turns it into grainy, dry worm-casting piles. Forest understory life is destroyed and other earthworm species disappear.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Fishing with my nephew made me wonder - would bait worms be good to add to my garden? No! We think of earthworms as good, but some species can be very destructive. The latest non-native worm to establish itself in several states is the crazy snakeworm. Fortunately, it's not in Maryland - we don't want that nightmare here. The crazy snakeworm voraciously consumes the upper organic soil layer or mulch and turns it into grainy, dry worm-casting piles. Forest understory life is destroyed and other earthworm species disappear.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
If you were hoping that this winter's freezing temperatures had sent the hated stink bugs packing, you are out of luck. Turns out, they have the good sense to come in from the cold. "I would be nice to think that winter killed them," said Stanton Gill of the University of Maryland Extension, where he specializes in integrated pest management. "But I doubt it. They are good at finding places to hunker down. " While one researcher recently found that nearly 98 percent of brown marmorated stink bugs died in the cold outside his lab, other experts expect to find no more than a 50 percent death rate over the winter.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
The first step in stopping invasive species from hitching a ride into the Chesapeake Bay aboard cargo ships is determining how to make massive ballast tanks an inhospitable environment. Maryland scientists hope they will find the answer aboard a new $2.7 million floating laboratory that is able to test ballast-water treatment systems under real-time conditions. The 155-foot vessel is part of the research fleet operated by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
My mother's landscape is full of pachysandra and periwinkle ground cover, both of which are on invasive species lists. Do I need to pull all of it out this spring? These two are different from most non-native invasive plants. Yes, these popular groundcovers are invasive when they are planted adjacent to a natural or park area, where they'll expand indefinitely and crowd out native plants. However, in a typical yard, expansion can be controlled. And they do not produce berries that birds spread or seeds that blow or wash away.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
The Carroll County Forestry Board will hold an Invasive Species Workshop from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 13 at Bear Branch Nature Center, 300 John Owings Road, Westminster. Invasive plants can alter the ecosystem and wildlife habitats. Participants can learn to identify and control non-native plants with experienced forestry volunteers. The cost is $10. Participants should take a lunch; drinks and snacks will be supplied. Dress for outdoor activities. Registration is required by Friday at 410-848-9290 or dbaker@dnr.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2013
A report from the Eastern Shore puts the northern snakehead - that slithery, toothy Frankenfish introduced to Central Maryland by some ecological saboteur a decade ago - in Marshyhope Creek, suggesting that the invasive species has moved beyond the Potomac River, across the Chesapeake Bay and into the Delmarva Peninsula. Apparently, these bad boys like to swim as much as they like to eat. Or, here's another theory: Some scoundrel caught a few snakeheads on the Western Shore, transported them across the Bay Bridge and stocked them in either the Marshyhope, east of Hurlock, or the Nanticoke River into which it flows.
SPORTS
January 22, 2011
Hardy, adaptable and prolific. We should all be so lucky. Instead, we are left to curse those traits in northern snakeheads, the toothy aliens that appeared by the hundreds in a tiny Crofton pond in 2002, touched off a national media frenzy and now have made themselves comfortable in the Potomac River. "Thousands and thousands of them" call the Nation's River home, from Georgetown to Mount Vernon to where it empties into the Chesapeake Bay, says Steve Minkkinen, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 9, 2012
If we're serious about getting the invasive snakeheads under control before they eat all the other fish in the Chesapeake watershed, then let me suggest that we get serious about the bounty. Those $200 gift certificates from a major outdoors retailer are nice, but there are only three of them, and those who catch a snakehead have to enter a drawing to win them, and the drawing isn't until November. That's not much of an incentive. Let's engage in some bigger thinking about this.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2013
A report from the Eastern Shore puts the northern snakehead - that slithery, toothy Frankenfish introduced to Central Maryland by some ecological saboteur a decade ago - in Marshyhope Creek, suggesting that the invasive species has moved beyond the Potomac River, across the Chesapeake Bay and into the Delmarva Peninsula. Apparently, these bad boys like to swim as much as they like to eat. Or, here's another theory: Some scoundrel caught a few snakeheads on the Western Shore, transported them across the Bay Bridge and stocked them in either the Marshyhope, east of Hurlock, or the Nanticoke River into which it flows.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
I am compelled to respond to George Fenwick's commentary ("The destructive invasive species purring on your lap," Feb. 26). He cites recent studies suggesting very high bird and mammal deaths due to outdoor cats. He then goes on to propose a Draconian solution that could accurately be described as a cat witch hunt. I do acknowledge the problem, particularly with feral cats (free-roaming, unowned). But Dr. Fenwick's attempt to demonize cats by use of terms like "invasive species," "invaders," "introduced predator," and "slaughter" invests his thesis with a hysteria usually reserved for al-Qaida sightings.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
George Fenwick's article on cats as an invasive species ("House cats: The destructive invasive species purring on your lap" Feb. 26) was filled with misinformation. It is easy to blame cats for environmental degradation; it is far more difficult to place the blame where it belongs. While cats kill birds, the threat they pose is in no way equal to the threat posed by human-caused habitat loss, climate change, or pollution. These are the threats to wildlife that we should be worrying about today.
NEWS
By George Fenwick | February 25, 2013
There is an invasive species in the United States responsible for the deaths of an estimated 14.7 billion birds and mammals each year. If that's not shocking enough, consider this: There's a good chance that one of these invaders is living in your house. Another in a long line of scientific studies documenting the impact of outdoor cats on our natural environment has just been released, bringing national attention again to the issue. This study was published in Nature Communications and authored by scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
Zebra mussels have finally made their way down the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay, though it's unclear what if any harm the invasive aquatic species might do there. This month, state biologists found 20 of the non-native shellfish attached to three channel marker buoys off Havre de Grace as they were removing the buoys from the water for the winter, the Department of Natural Resources reported. Native to the Caspian and other seas in eastern Europe, zebra mussels were first discovered in the United States in the Great Lakes region in the 1980s, likely transported there in the ballast water of ships.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Chad Wells is leaving Alewife. His last day at the downtown tavern is Saturday. Wells is headed to Annapolis, where he will be "re-concepting" an existing restaurant - he wouldn't say which one. But the chef, probably best known for his culinary experiments with snakehead and other invasive species, was excited about shaking up the conservative Annapolis dining scene. "I want to a be a front runner in establishing local and invasive food in Annapolis," Wells said. "I want to put my heart out there with food.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
When Judy Harlan's husband, Bill, walked up the hill to their Harford County farmhouse in late May and told her she had to come see something by the Little Gunpowder Falls, she knew it would be unusual -- but an alienlike plant, growing fast, with leaves the size of tabletops? "I was just amazed at the size of the leaves," Judy Harlan said. "It looked like a giant Queen Anne's lace." What they had found next door to their farmland was giant hogweed, a cousin to the carrot and an invasive species worthy of a most-wanted list for noxious plants.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | July 13, 2008
The hunters were stalking their prey on a wooded path in Patapsco Valley State Park south of Baltimore, peering closely into the underbrush. But they weren't looking for animals. The group of amateur naturalists was on a search-and-destroy mission for exotic plants that have invaded Maryland and are killing off native life. The problem of invasive species is drawing increased attention as globalization has brought more international trade, which has led to more seed-hopping from continent to continent.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 9, 2012
If we're serious about getting the invasive snakeheads under control before they eat all the other fish in the Chesapeake watershed, then let me suggest that we get serious about the bounty. Those $200 gift certificates from a major outdoors retailer are nice, but there are only three of them, and those who catch a snakehead have to enter a drawing to win them, and the drawing isn't until November. That's not much of an incentive. Let's engage in some bigger thinking about this.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
My mother's landscape is full of pachysandra and periwinkle ground cover, both of which are on invasive species lists. Do I need to pull all of it out this spring? These two are different from most non-native invasive plants. Yes, these popular groundcovers are invasive when they are planted adjacent to a natural or park area, where they'll expand indefinitely and crowd out native plants. However, in a typical yard, expansion can be controlled. And they do not produce berries that birds spread or seeds that blow or wash away.
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