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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
Nobody would ever mistake Gregor Markowitz for a music mogul, but the balding former Baltimore shipwright has pull in the industry just the same. Each week, hundreds of listeners from around the world tune into his Internet radio station, Hober.com, run from a home-built studio in the Washington suburb of Takoma Park. Hober broadcasts all folk, all the time - enough back-porch banjo and fiddle, he says, to turn listeners "green with bluegrass." It's not the kind of music found much on the airwaves these days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
The new year brings some new jobs on radio and Internet for one-time Baltimore media figures Anita Marks, Marc Clarke and Troy Johnson. Marks, a former show host at 105.7 The Fan, will start Jan. 5 as a weekend host on NBC Sports Radio. Her shift will run from noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays. At this point, no Baltimore stations carry the NBC Sports Network. Several stations in Washington do, but none carries the full lineup of NBC programming. You can, however, listen to NBC Sports Radio online here . The new job for Marks was announced and reported on Dec. 18. You can read one of those reports at sportsmediajournal.com . I wonder if the Baltimore guys who seemed to so love hating on Marks when she was at 105.7 The Fan will be checking out her new network gig. Meanwhile, Clarke and Johnson, of The Big Phat Morning Crew that left the airwaves at Baltimore's WERQ (92.3 FM)
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The arrest of a Baltimore blogger this weekend showed how a normally mundane bit of police work - the serving of a warrant - can be complicated in an age of Twitter and Internet radio. It briefly put a national spotlight on what normally wouldn't even make the local news. Frank James MacArthur, 47, a steady presence as an observer at city crime scenes and a cab driver by trade, took to Twitter and an online radio service to stream his dealings with police at his home Saturday to execute an arrest warrant connected to 2009 weapons charges for which he had received probation before judgment.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The arrest of a Baltimore blogger this weekend showed how a normally mundane bit of police work - the serving of a warrant - can be complicated in an age of Twitter and Internet radio. It briefly put a national spotlight on what normally wouldn't even make the local news. Frank James MacArthur, 47, a steady presence as an observer at city crime scenes and a cab driver by trade, took to Twitter and an online radio service to stream his dealings with police at his home Saturday to execute an arrest warrant connected to 2009 weapons charges for which he had received probation before judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Colker and David Colker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2001
Jeff Burgess walks into his Bakersfield, Calif., broadcast studio (his bedroom), checks the transmission equipment (his PC), sits in the studio chair (blue vinyl, purchased used for $2) and searches his CD library (cardboard boxes on the floor). He adjusts the microphone on the announcer's deck (built by a local carpenter for a 12-pack of beer) and speaks the words that can be heard, potentially, by millions around the world. "This is Destroy Radio!" At best, maybe 300 people actually hear Burgess.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The songs remained the same on Internet radio yesterday, as many stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty increase that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to Web casters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates. That amounted to a reprieve for Internet radio stations, some of which had warned they would have to shut down Sunday when a major increase in music royalties and fees kicked in. "Each company has had to decide how they want to act on their own, but I think it's pretty clear that SoundExchange is not going to go after people providing they are trying to work it out," said Tim Westergren, founder of Pandora Media Inc., which operates one of the largest Internet radio sites from Oakland, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
The new year brings some new jobs on radio and Internet for one-time Baltimore media figures Anita Marks, Marc Clarke and Troy Johnson. Marks, a former show host at 105.7 The Fan, will start Jan. 5 as a weekend host on NBC Sports Radio. Her shift will run from noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays. At this point, no Baltimore stations carry the NBC Sports Network. Several stations in Washington do, but none carries the full lineup of NBC programming. You can, however, listen to NBC Sports Radio online here . The new job for Marks was announced and reported on Dec. 18. You can read one of those reports at sportsmediajournal.com . I wonder if the Baltimore guys who seemed to so love hating on Marks when she was at 105.7 The Fan will be checking out her new network gig. Meanwhile, Clarke and Johnson, of The Big Phat Morning Crew that left the airwaves at Baltimore's WERQ (92.3 FM)
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Some mom-and-pop and public Internet radio stations are worried that new royalty fees could put them out of business or hinder the amount of music content they can afford to broadcast. A decision this month by the Copyright Royalty Board, a three-member panel of judges under the Library of Congress, would significantly increase what radio companies pay to air music over the Internet. The added fees, which are paid to both performers and their labels, could fundamentally change the burgeoning Internet radio industry.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | April 11, 2011
I really want to like devices like the Sony Dash. Sony calls the Dash a "Personal Internet Viewer" even though I think it's more of a "Smart Alarm Clock" or "WiFi Digital Pictureframe". The Dash has a seven inch touchscreen and can pipe in content from different apps. It does internet radio, Netflix, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, weather, traffic, etc. It is not a portable device however so the Dash is meant for the bedside or kitchen counter. If you're a Dash fan, you'll know that $79.99 is a great price.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2004
First came pirate radio, then Internet radio. But in the past month, a new way of circumventing the big, bad broadcast corporations has emerged: podcasts. Tune in to these blog-based homemade radio shows, and you'll hear any number of things: a weekly hourlong program about board games; a daily amateur photography show with an Australian computer programmer as host; regular people, unschooled in the ways of radio, talking about anything and everything the way real people talk - clumsily, with curses, dead air and all. If you've never heard of a podcast, don't worry.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | April 11, 2011
I really want to like devices like the Sony Dash. Sony calls the Dash a "Personal Internet Viewer" even though I think it's more of a "Smart Alarm Clock" or "WiFi Digital Pictureframe". The Dash has a seven inch touchscreen and can pipe in content from different apps. It does internet radio, Netflix, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, weather, traffic, etc. It is not a portable device however so the Dash is meant for the bedside or kitchen counter. If you're a Dash fan, you'll know that $79.99 is a great price.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 14, 2008
Some people never find their life's calling. By the time she turned 13, Amanda Beale had three. Beale started taping radio shows on a karaoke machine at the age of 6, shooting video at 8 and recording music with her older brother's mixer a few years later. "I was never a one-job person," Beale said. Today, Beale, 27, channels her three passions into the local music scene. A consummate multitasker, she has embraced technology and become a pioneer in the local hip-hop community. Her childhood loves have blossomed into a full-time career as a recording studio owner, radio programmer and videographer.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The songs remained the same on Internet radio yesterday, as many stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty increase that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to Web casters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates. That amounted to a reprieve for Internet radio stations, some of which had warned they would have to shut down Sunday when a major increase in music royalties and fees kicked in. "Each company has had to decide how they want to act on their own, but I think it's pretty clear that SoundExchange is not going to go after people providing they are trying to work it out," said Tim Westergren, founder of Pandora Media Inc., which operates one of the largest Internet radio sites from Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By SONiA | July 4, 2007
I've spent my entire career making music that transcends fear. In fact, the Baltimore-based band I started with my sister in 1994 is called disappear fear. It might come as a surprise, then, that I'm writing now about something a lot of independent artists are scared about these days: the impending death of Internet radio. Indie artists don't often have the luxury of being the "next big thing," endorsed and promoted by the record industry. For a lot of us, broadcast radio is mostly uncharted territory.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Some mom-and-pop and public Internet radio stations are worried that new royalty fees could put them out of business or hinder the amount of music content they can afford to broadcast. A decision this month by the Copyright Royalty Board, a three-member panel of judges under the Library of Congress, would significantly increase what radio companies pay to air music over the Internet. The added fees, which are paid to both performers and their labels, could fundamentally change the burgeoning Internet radio industry.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 2005
"Remember, be kind to your mailman," said Jane Harris, a disc jockey. She softened her voice until it was a little insinuating: "He only wants to deliver the mail." Harris is a DJ on DogCat Radio.com, a new Internet radio station for pets. Now dogs, cats, hamsters and parrots can keep the anxiety, the loneliness, the restlessness at bay while their owners are out. It is radio just for them, live 17 hours a day, 4 a.m. to 9 p.m. Pacific time, and podcast for the rest of the 24 hours a day. Those who listen to DogCatRadio will find that there is generally an animal motif to the playlist, such as "Hound Dog": "You ain't nothin' but a hound dog/ Cryin' all the time."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 2005
"Remember, be kind to your mailman," said Jane Harris, a disc jockey. She softened her voice until it was a little insinuating: "He only wants to deliver the mail." Harris is a DJ on DogCat Radio.com, a new Internet radio station for pets. Now dogs, cats, hamsters and parrots can keep the anxiety, the loneliness, the restlessness at bay while their owners are out. It is radio just for them, live 17 hours a day, 4 a.m. to 9 p.m. Pacific time, and podcast for the rest of the 24 hours a day. Those who listen to DogCatRadio will find that there is generally an animal motif to the playlist, such as "Hound Dog": "You ain't nothin' but a hound dog/ Cryin' all the time."
NEWS
By SONiA | July 4, 2007
I've spent my entire career making music that transcends fear. In fact, the Baltimore-based band I started with my sister in 1994 is called disappear fear. It might come as a surprise, then, that I'm writing now about something a lot of independent artists are scared about these days: the impending death of Internet radio. Indie artists don't often have the luxury of being the "next big thing," endorsed and promoted by the record industry. For a lot of us, broadcast radio is mostly uncharted territory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2004
First came pirate radio, then Internet radio. But in the past month, a new way of circumventing the big, bad broadcast corporations has emerged: podcasts. Tune in to these blog-based homemade radio shows, and you'll hear any number of things: a weekly hourlong program about board games; a daily amateur photography show with an Australian computer programmer as host; regular people, unschooled in the ways of radio, talking about anything and everything the way real people talk - clumsily, with curses, dead air and all. If you've never heard of a podcast, don't worry.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
Nobody would ever mistake Gregor Markowitz for a music mogul, but the balding former Baltimore shipwright has pull in the industry just the same. Each week, hundreds of listeners from around the world tune into his Internet radio station, Hober.com, run from a home-built studio in the Washington suburb of Takoma Park. Hober broadcasts all folk, all the time - enough back-porch banjo and fiddle, he says, to turn listeners "green with bluegrass." It's not the kind of music found much on the airwaves these days.
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