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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 18, 2009
The Blast has partnered with B2 Networks to broadcast the team's remaining 10 home games live via the Internet at www.B2TV.com, the team announced. To access broadcasts, fans can go to www.baltimoreblast.com or www.B2TV.com free of charge. To watch the games, a high-speed Internet connection and a current version of Microsoft Windows Media Player is needed. The Blast's next home game is at 7:35 p.m.. Saturday against the Philadelphia KiXX.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Baltimore was among dozens of disappointed cities when Google announced it had picked Kansas City, Mo., for a high-speed fiber-optic data network in 2011, but officials vowed to continue fighting for fiber nonetheless. Nearly four years later, some are disappointed by the lack of progress— and want to show that some of the fervor that wooed Google remains, waiting for new, affordable options for fast Internet service. A community group based in North Baltimore has attracted more than 900 people and nearly $17,000 in donations to a crowdsourced campaign, the Baltimore Broadband Coalition.
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SPORTS
December 12, 2000
Sports columnist John Eisenberg will participate in a live Internet chat today from noon to 1 p.m. Go to http://www.sunspot.net/sports to join in or follow along.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
Janay Rice's public message today about the Ravens' decision to cut her husband, running back Ray Rice, and the NFL's decision to ban him for life after a video was published showing him knocking her unconscious is likely to have precisely the opposite of the effect she desired, drawing more attention to what is for her, a painful family matter. In a post on her Instagram account, Ms. Rice condemned the media and the public for causing her family anguish and forcing them to relive "a moment we regret every day. " She added: "If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you've succeeded on so many levels.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 30, 2000
NEW YORK -- AT&T Corp. Chairman C. Michael Armstrong raised his bet on Internet-access provider Excite@Home Corp., buying another year to convince his two biggest cable partners that the company will meet growth goals. Comcast Corp. and Cox Communications Inc. agreed to let Excite@Home deliver Internet content through their cable television lines beyond June 2002. In return, AT&T, which owns a 56 percent voting stake in Excite@Home, gave Comcast and Cox the option to sell their Excite@Home stakes to AT&T for as much as $3 billion next year.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 15, 2011
If you live in Maryland and order a box of $5 stogies over the Internet this summer, you might get busted for accepting an illegal tobacco shipment. Or you might not. Comptroller Peter Franchot says he doesn't want to enforce a prohibition on Internet sales of premium cigars that took effect May 1. The ban was "an unintended consequence" of 2010 reform of wholesale tobacco commerce, he said in a letter to legislative leaders dated Monday. He asked their permission to suspend enforcement of the law until the fall, when the General Assembly meets again.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
I've been trying to figure out what to say about bullied bus monitor Karen Klein for four days now -- just watching the viral video of her being bullied to tears by middle-school students in New York last week left me so discombobulated I could barely speak. The boys' vile, relentless verbal attack of her, I finally realize, feels like the personification of every Internet troll I've ever run into online. I've seen horrible personal attacks from anonymous (and sometimes not) posters that had the exact same tenor, and seen commenters gang up in the exact same way, while gaining strength and bravado hiding behind their keyboards.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
A deeper look into this case and the law enforcement issues related to it appeared in Thursday's newspaper. Click here for that article.  There can, in fact, be a corrective mechanism when it comes to the mob mentality of the Internet.  This week, a video was posted online of a seemingly lost and disoriented man being swarmed by a group of young people, then sucker punched, robbed, and stripped naked of his clothing on...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Key senators on the committee that handles casino-related matters rejected the notion of taking up the issue of Internet gambling during next week's special session, saying there isn't enough time to weigh the implications of a step that could, in effect, put slot machines in Maryland homes. Four Democratic members of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, each a supporter of other forms of gambling expansion, said Friday that they are not prepared to sort through the complex issues surrounding online gambling in a session that is expected to last less than a week.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
I see in the Sunpapers that Maryland wants to tax us on the things we buy on the Internet ("Bill to require sales tax for online purchases advances in Senate," April 22). Don't we pay enough taxes now? The state seems to tax everything that is not nailed down. We need to vote these people out of office. Who are these people telling us that the gas tax will be lower? You know that will never happen. Our motto for Maryland should be, "The state that taxes us to death. " Gerald Yamin, Pikesville
NEWS
Jeff Johnson | September 3, 2014
From ice bucket challenges to the upcoming midterm elections, we are reminded again and again how the Internet has changed the way we live and connect and organize. Digital equality has become fundamental to economic, cultural and political equality. Until this year's Oscar "selfie" by Ellen DeGeneres, the most tweeted picture in our history was the re-election photo of President and Mrs. Obama embracing. But the more important the Internet becomes, the more critical it is that this digital public square be open to all - if we've learned anything in recent years, it's that authorities are far too quick to shut down protests, silence journalists or even lock down communities when it serves them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2014
Media coverage of the death of Robin Williams is still being debated for good reason: It was filled with ignorance and wretched excess. And the more time you have to reflect on it, the worse it seems. From Shepard Smith characterizing Williams as a "coward" on Fox News, to widespread misinformation about the comedian's finances, the coverage was pathetic -- especially on cable news channels where most viewers turned for information initially. If cable news would follow the simple dictate of publishing only what is known to be true, we would be a much smarter and less addled nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The girl in the tire swing is swaying above North Avenue, sneakers pointing to a traffic light. A block away, the Natty Boh guy and the Utz girl speed away on their wedding day, cans trailing behind their car. And then there's Cupid, aiming an arrow at the street. Above him float the words, "I loved more. " The works of artist Reed Bmore look like line drawings come to life. The 22-year-old shapes sculptures from metal wire, then hangs them on light poles and traffic light cables.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Comcast is making more poor families eligible for a program offering $10-a-month broadband Internet access, and it's offering them a period of free service as part of a back-to-school promotion. Households with past due balances were previously barred from the program, known as Internet Essentials, but they will no longer be if their unpaid bills are more than a year old, according to a blog post on Comcast's website. The Philadelphia-based cable television and Internet service provider also said it would allow families with a "reasonable" amount of debt to pay it off in installments.
NEWS
By Philip Spevak, Stan Wilson and Anthony Gill | July 1, 2014
There is a monopoly for fast Internet services in Baltimore City. As a consequence, a new Comcast customer can pay as much as $1,000 more over two years for standard "triple-play" service (telephone, Internet and cable television) than would a new customer in Annapolis, where competition exists. And the fastest Internet speed offered by Comcast in Baltimore is only one-third of what is currently available in Annapolis and most of the state. We pay more for less in Baltimore because fast fiber optic technology - often called fiber to the premises (FTTP)
TRAVEL
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
As Ocean City braces for Senior Week, the annual migration of graduating high school students to the beaches, thousands more young partyers are expected to join them. A loosely organized College Takeover Beach Week also starts this weekend, an event that surprised Virginia Beach last year when an influx of up to 40,000 visitors was accompanied by a rise in cases of violence and disorderly behavior. Ocean City officials say they won't be caught off-guard and have prepared for both Senior Week and the "takeover" with increased patrols and new boardwalk surveillance cameras that will be monitored in real time.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 15, 2010
My nephew posted a video on Facebook of his brand-new daughter hiccupping, and it was so cute I about died. I immediately grabbed the video and posted it on my Facebook profile for all 600 of my friends to see, and I e-mailed copies to other friends who don't hang out on Facebook. Then I opened a new folder on my PC and named it "Quinn" after my new great-niece and filed a copy of the video there. I copied some of the pictures my nephew had posted of his daughter to the folder, and shipped the whole business to other friends.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | February 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Americans pride themselves on leading the world in the digital quest to conquer cyberspace. But Britain, which introduced the first mass postal service some 160 years ago, has leaped ahead by letting anyone with a computer and a phone line access the Internet at no cost.Dozens of Internet service providers now offer Britons free unlimited access to the Internet, along with e-mail and large blocks of data storage space. Earlier this month, giant British Telecom waived all access fees for its online customers.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A company that helps nonprofits raise money has landed a $10 million investment and is acquiring Baltimore-based competitor GiveCorps for an undisclosed sum. Network For Good, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., has created a for-profit subsidiary NetworkForGood.com to receive the round of investment, led by Baltimore venture capital firm Camden Partners. Other investors included former AOL executive Steve Case and GiveCorps CEO Vince Talbert, who will become NetworkForGood.com's board chairman.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
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