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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
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NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
NEWS
November 3, 2007
Johns Hopkins University faculty will offer 32 presentations covering issues in prevention, treatment and diagnosis of diseases affecting women from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. today at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Topics of the 13th annual health conference, titled "A Woman's Journey," include aging, heart disease, breast cancer, global warming, stress, weight loss and depression. The keynote speaker is Leslie Mancuso, president and chief executive officer of JHPIEGO, a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health organization that works to improve health care conditions in 50 countries.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Promotions Thomas A. LaVeist has been installed as the inaugural William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Poli cy at the Johns Hop kins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The med ical sociologist was also the inaugural recipient of the Knowledge Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health. LaVeist, an expert on health disparities and the prob lems in minority communi ties, has been on the Hop kins faculty since 1990. His latest book, Minority Popu lations and Health: An In troduction to Health Dis parities in the United States, was published in April 2005.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris and Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
A task force of 40 Maryland nurses and doctors is waiting to travel to Kuwait to treat war-injured Kuwaiti citizens."They have been told to go with their black bags -- they could go from putting a band aid on to doing open-heart surgery," said Tricia Slawinski, project manager for the Maryland International Health Task Force.Dr. James D'Orta, chairman of the task force and assistant director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Franklin Square Hospital, said the group was formed at the request of Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Despite the death toll exacted by civil war, poverty and drought, developing nations have generally improved the health of their children through increased immunization, improved primary care and simple techniques like adding iodine to salt.The annual "State of the World's Children" report, released yesterday by UNICEF, said that by next year, 2.5 million fewer children would be dying annually from malnutrition and preventable diseases than died in 1990. Also, 750,000 fewer youngsters will be disabled, blinded, crippled or mentally retarded.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
Date of birth: Nov. 17, 1969 Party affiliation: Republican Professional background: President of an international health care nonprofit (www.depression.org). Chairman and CEO of local small business (www.compassmarketinginc.com); named a Future 50 award winner by Baltimore Smart CEO magazine. Educational background: MBA, University of Baltimore; bachelor's degree, accounting, Towson University. Personal: Married to Kathryn Goetzke White; enjoys reading newspapers; Annapolis resident.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today described war-ravaged Kuwait as a country darkened by clouds of smoke, littered with live ammunition and reeling from destruction at the hands of the Iraqi military."
BUSINESS
April 30, 2008
Banking and finance * Bay National Bank announced the appointments of Charles J. Fleury IV; Curt H.G. Heinfelden, cash management; Gilbert F. Kennedy III, commercial banking; and Daniel T. Murtaugh, residential mortgage lending, as senior vice presidents of the Lutherville-based bank. * Signal Hill appointed Daniel O'Neil director of the investment banking team and named Michael Schemel managing director, institutional sales, and Todd Greenwald as senior research analyst in the capital markets team of the Baltimore-headquartered specialty investment banking firm.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Alfred Sommer, a former Johns Hopkins University dean who discovered the importance of vitamin A in preventing child blindness, will accept an award Sunday in Israel honoring his contributions to preventive medicine. Sommer was chosen as a laureate of the Dan David Prize, bestowed in various fields by Tel Aviv University. He shares the $1 million prize with Esther Duflo, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist being honored for her work on poverty. The Dan David Foundation awards three prizes each year - one for achievements focused on the past, one for the present, and one, as in Sommer's case, for the future.
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