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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
BEIJING -- Alarmed by a surge in bird flu infections and deaths in Turkey, 33 countries and multilateral institutions pledged $1.9 billion yesterday to fight the disease. The pledges, at the conclusion of a two-day conference here, are considerably greater than the $1.2 billion to $1.4 billion that the World Bank had said was needed over the next three years. The money will pay for such tasks as strengthening veterinary and medical surveillance for outbreaks, stockpiling surgical masks and other protective equipment, and expanding research.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 1994
BALTIMOREFor more information, call the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association at (410) 659-7300 within Maryland or (800) 343-3468 outside Maryland.* June 27-July 3 American Automatic Control Council, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Professor Hassan Khalil. Expected attendance: 500.* July 12-16 Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians, annual convention, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Angela Megoules. Expected attendance: 250.* July 14-16 American Association of Nurserymen, Mid-Atlantic trade show and convention, Convention Center.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 8, 2007
Dr. Leslie Mancuso, 50, is a world traveler, but most of her destinations are not exactly haute couture hotspots. "I just got back from Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. I leave in a month for Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa," says Mancuso, the head of JHPIEGO (pronounced ja-pie-go), a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health group that focuses on improving access to medical care for women and families in developing countries. "We're the jewel of Baltimore, and we've been here for nearly 35 years," says Mancuso, who joined JHPIEGO five years ago and lives in Fells Point with her husband.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
It appears that Luis A. Luna's letter ("Perdue: Chicken waste handled in environmentally responsible manner," April 7) is a continuation of the poultry industry's tendency to speak out of both sides of its mouth regarding environmental impacts from its poultry operations. To clarify, we fully recognize the value of manure and nutrient management in agriculture. What Mr. Luna fails to acknowledge is that the enormous quantity of manure generated by the industrial production of chicken contains a range of other contaminants of environmental health concern which make it more properly referred to as waste.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 10, 2008
Mimi suffers from tuberculosis in the opera La Boheme, but in reality, there is little that's romantic about the disease. It is the second-leading cause of death from infection in the world (though not in the United States), says Dr. Richard E. Chaisson, professor of medicine, epidemiology and international health at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and founding director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Tuberculosis Research. Worldwide, the highest number of TB cases and deaths in recorded history will occur this year, according to Hopkins' Department of Medicine Web site.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1991
Millions of turtle eggs exported from the United States to be hatched and the turtles sold as pets may harbor strains of salmonella bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and could pose a serious international health threat to young children, U.S. and Canadian health officials say.Salmonella carried by healthy reptiles and livestock can infect people and cause severe abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. The condition is rarely fatal in adults, but in young children it can require hospitalization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 2000
UNITED NATIONS -- More than two-thirds of the world's nations are failing to supply safe blood to their populations, the World Health Organization says, adding significantly to the spread of the virus that causes AIDS, potentially deadly forms of hepatitis and other diseases. The countries where people are most at risk are the poorest and often those where diseases are spreading fastest, the World Health Organization says. These countries contain 80 percent of the world's population, or about 4.8 billion people.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today described war-ravaged Kuwait as a country darkened by clouds of smoke, littered with live ammunition and reeling from destruction at the hands of the Iraqi military."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
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