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NEWS
September 13, 2010
Recent news coverage of the six-month anniversary of Haiti's devastating earthquake overlooked a terrible tragedy: the destruction of a nursing school filled with more than 100 students and teachers. The horrific event is significant not only because of the appalling loss of life but because it diminished Haiti's current and future nursing workforce — already severely understaffed — at a time when nursing skills are needed most. Haiti's loss underscored a larger problem plaguing countries worldwide.
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NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 1, 2003
The NAACP will be able to fly its civil rights banner on a worldwide stage if a United Nations committee approves its application to become a "non-governmental organization." The NGO application for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is in the final stages of approval and should be completed no later than July, a U.N. spokesman said yesterday. The NAACP is seeking consultative status with the U.N. Economic and Social Council; 2,234 NGOs work with the council in areas such as human rights and international health, economic and social problems.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1991
The largest food-borne cholera outbreak to appear in the United States since the beginning of a massive epidemic in South America was confirmed by New Jersey state health officials yesterday.Eight people, from Jersey City and West New York, became ill earlier this month after consuming illegally imported crab meat from Ecuador. Four were later diagnosed as suffering from cholera, a potentiallyfatal disease whose symptoms include severe diarrhea and vomiting leading to dehydration.All the victims recovered.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
Go ahead and bang a drum, hang from the curtains and spin that hula hoop. Area gym instructors say it's good for you, even if you don't realize it. The unconventional workouts are part of a movement to keep the masses focused on their fitness by disguising exercise as playtime, like spinach in brownies. And while more conventional spin, yoga and Latin dance-inspired Zumba aerobics classes remain gym staples, the quirky and even slightly juvenile additions have been attracting regulars.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2003
In what would be one of the largest health-care fraud settlements in U.S. history, Abbott Laboratories will pay more than $600 million to resolve allegations that it worked with medical-care providers to bilk government health insurance programs for the poor and elderly. The medical products giant disclosed late yesterday that it would take a one-time second-quarter charge of $622 million, or 34 cents a share, as a result of an anticipated settlement of civil and criminal allegations against its Ross Products nutrition business.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
NEWS
November 3, 2007
Johns Hopkins University faculty will offer 32 presentations covering issues in prevention, treatment and diagnosis of diseases affecting women from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. today at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Topics of the 13th annual health conference, titled "A Woman's Journey," include aging, heart disease, breast cancer, global warming, stress, weight loss and depression. The keynote speaker is Leslie Mancuso, president and chief executive officer of JHPIEGO, a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health organization that works to improve health care conditions in 50 countries.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Promotions Thomas A. LaVeist has been installed as the inaugural William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Poli cy at the Johns Hop kins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The med ical sociologist was also the inaugural recipient of the Knowledge Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health. LaVeist, an expert on health disparities and the prob lems in minority communi ties, has been on the Hop kins faculty since 1990. His latest book, Minority Popu lations and Health: An In troduction to Health Dis parities in the United States, was published in April 2005.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris and Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
A task force of 40 Maryland nurses and doctors is waiting to travel to Kuwait to treat war-injured Kuwaiti citizens."They have been told to go with their black bags -- they could go from putting a band aid on to doing open-heart surgery," said Tricia Slawinski, project manager for the Maryland International Health Task Force.Dr. James D'Orta, chairman of the task force and assistant director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Franklin Square Hospital, said the group was formed at the request of Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
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