Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInternational Health
IN THE NEWS

International Health

NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 8, 2007
Dr. Leslie Mancuso, 50, is a world traveler, but most of her destinations are not exactly haute couture hotspots. "I just got back from Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. I leave in a month for Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa," says Mancuso, the head of JHPIEGO (pronounced ja-pie-go), a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health group that focuses on improving access to medical care for women and families in developing countries. "We're the jewel of Baltimore, and we've been here for nearly 35 years," says Mancuso, who joined JHPIEGO five years ago and lives in Fells Point with her husband.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Leslie Mancuso | March 1, 2009
Last week, the low-budget film Slumdog Millionaire received eight Academy Awards, including Best Film. Slumdog tells a story of success and love of a child from the slums of Mumbai, India. It warmed the hearts of the world. But in reality, most slum-dwellers continue to face desperate living and health conditions. The international health community knows that most slum stories do not have a happy ending. Experts agree that the world is rapidly urbanizing: Three of five people are expected to live in urban areas within the next 25 years, and 95 percent of urban growth will be in the developing world - with most of that growth occurring in slums.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994
BALTIMOREFor more information, call the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association at (410) 659-7300 within Maryland or (800) 343-3468 outside Maryland.* June 27-July 3 American Automatic Control Council, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Professor Hassan Khalil. Expected attendance: 500.* July 12-16 Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians, annual convention, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Angela Megoules. Expected attendance: 250.* July 14-16 American Association of Nurserymen, Mid-Atlantic trade show and convention, Convention Center.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
It appears that Luis A. Luna's letter ("Perdue: Chicken waste handled in environmentally responsible manner," April 7) is a continuation of the poultry industry's tendency to speak out of both sides of its mouth regarding environmental impacts from its poultry operations. To clarify, we fully recognize the value of manure and nutrient management in agriculture. What Mr. Luna fails to acknowledge is that the enormous quantity of manure generated by the industrial production of chicken contains a range of other contaminants of environmental health concern which make it more properly referred to as waste.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Recent news coverage of the six-month anniversary of Haiti's devastating earthquake overlooked a terrible tragedy: the destruction of a nursing school filled with more than 100 students and teachers. The horrific event is significant not only because of the appalling loss of life but because it diminished Haiti's current and future nursing workforce — already severely understaffed — at a time when nursing skills are needed most. Haiti's loss underscored a larger problem plaguing countries worldwide.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1991
The largest food-borne cholera outbreak to appear in the United States since the beginning of a massive epidemic in South America was confirmed by New Jersey state health officials yesterday.Eight people, from Jersey City and West New York, became ill earlier this month after consuming illegally imported crab meat from Ecuador. Four were later diagnosed as suffering from cholera, a potentiallyfatal disease whose symptoms include severe diarrhea and vomiting leading to dehydration.All the victims recovered.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Those looking to lose weight, quit smoking or keep tabs on a malady have a lot of choices in the smartphone app stores. Choosing one that's beneficial is more of a problem. Science is still trying to catch up to the market for mobile health applications, software that runs on mobile devices such as iPhones, Androids and tablets, which has produced tens of thousands of possible ways to achieve better health for free or a fee. One of the broadest efforts to assess "mHealth" strategies is being made by dozens of faculty, staff and students in multiple departments at the Johns Hopkins University, which has 49 official studies under way in Baltimore and around the world as part of its Global mHealth Initiative.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2003
In what would be one of the largest health-care fraud settlements in U.S. history, Abbott Laboratories will pay more than $600 million to resolve allegations that it worked with medical-care providers to bilk government health insurance programs for the poor and elderly. The medical products giant disclosed late yesterday that it would take a one-time second-quarter charge of $622 million, or 34 cents a share, as a result of an anticipated settlement of civil and criminal allegations against its Ross Products nutrition business.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.