Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInternational Health
IN THE NEWS

International Health

NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
BEIJING -- Alarmed by a surge in bird flu infections and deaths in Turkey, 33 countries and multilateral institutions pledged $1.9 billion yesterday to fight the disease. The pledges, at the conclusion of a two-day conference here, are considerably greater than the $1.2 billion to $1.4 billion that the World Bank had said was needed over the next three years. The money will pay for such tasks as strengthening veterinary and medical surveillance for outbreaks, stockpiling surgical masks and other protective equipment, and expanding research.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994
BALTIMOREFor more information, call the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association at (410) 659-7300 within Maryland or (800) 343-3468 outside Maryland.* June 27-July 3 American Automatic Control Council, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Professor Hassan Khalil. Expected attendance: 500.* July 12-16 Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians, annual convention, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Angela Megoules. Expected attendance: 250.* July 14-16 American Association of Nurserymen, Mid-Atlantic trade show and convention, Convention Center.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 8, 2007
Dr. Leslie Mancuso, 50, is a world traveler, but most of her destinations are not exactly haute couture hotspots. "I just got back from Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. I leave in a month for Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa," says Mancuso, the head of JHPIEGO (pronounced ja-pie-go), a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health group that focuses on improving access to medical care for women and families in developing countries. "We're the jewel of Baltimore, and we've been here for nearly 35 years," says Mancuso, who joined JHPIEGO five years ago and lives in Fells Point with her husband.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
Dr. Melvyn C. Thorne, a semiretired professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health who was interested in maternal child care and family planning in developing countries, died Aug. 16 of a heart attack at his Roland Park home. He was 77. The son of a mechanic and a homemaker, Dr. Thorne was born and raised in San Francisco. After graduation in 1950 from Lowell High School, he worked his way to Europe aboard a freighter. "He had decided not to go to college and spent time bicycling and traveling throughout Europe," said his wife of 52 years, the former Dorothy Richardson, an educator he met when both were students at the University of California at Berkeley.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Recent news coverage of the six-month anniversary of Haiti's devastating earthquake overlooked a terrible tragedy: the destruction of a nursing school filled with more than 100 students and teachers. The horrific event is significant not only because of the appalling loss of life but because it diminished Haiti's current and future nursing workforce — already severely understaffed — at a time when nursing skills are needed most. Haiti's loss underscored a larger problem plaguing countries worldwide.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today described war-ravaged Kuwait as a country darkened by clouds of smoke, littered with live ammunition and reeling from destruction at the hands of the Iraqi military."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | May 20, 1991
The Maryland International Health Task Force headed for war-ravaged Kuwait yesterday on a weeklong mission to perform chores ranging from mending broken limbs and performing delicate surgery to advising officials on ways to rebuild hospitals.The task force -- including 40 high-level health care professionals, with specialists in emergency medicine, anesthesiologists, pediatricians, and plastic and orthopedic surgeons -- left Franklin Square Hospital about 1 p.m. amid festive bon voyage wishes from relatives, co-workers and Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
FEATURES
July 29, 1991
Who: Nancy and Larry FittonAges: 38 and 44 respectivelyFrom: Long GreenAssignment: Honduras, 1976-79Larry taught photography at Pan American Agricultural School, known as Zamorano. Nancy taught nutrition to village women, produced audio-visual materials and conducted workshops for auxiliary nurses in the capital, Tegucigalpa.Update: She earned master's in international health at Johns Hopkins and later worked for Pan American Health Organization and World Vision in Costa Rica before becoming full-time mother to their three children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.