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BUSINESS
June 27, 1994
BALTIMOREFor more information, call the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association at (410) 659-7300 within Maryland or (800) 343-3468 outside Maryland.* June 27-July 3 American Automatic Control Council, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Professor Hassan Khalil. Expected attendance: 500.* July 12-16 Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians, annual convention, Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Contact: Angela Megoules. Expected attendance: 250.* July 14-16 American Association of Nurserymen, Mid-Atlantic trade show and convention, Convention Center.
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NEWS
April 8, 2010
It appears that Luis A. Luna's letter ("Perdue: Chicken waste handled in environmentally responsible manner," April 7) is a continuation of the poultry industry's tendency to speak out of both sides of its mouth regarding environmental impacts from its poultry operations. To clarify, we fully recognize the value of manure and nutrient management in agriculture. What Mr. Luna fails to acknowledge is that the enormous quantity of manure generated by the industrial production of chicken contains a range of other contaminants of environmental health concern which make it more properly referred to as waste.
FEATURES
July 29, 1991
Who: Nancy and Larry FittonAges: 38 and 44 respectivelyFrom: Long GreenAssignment: Honduras, 1976-79Larry taught photography at Pan American Agricultural School, known as Zamorano. Nancy taught nutrition to village women, produced audio-visual materials and conducted workshops for auxiliary nurses in the capital, Tegucigalpa.Update: She earned master's in international health at Johns Hopkins and later worked for Pan American Health Organization and World Vision in Costa Rica before becoming full-time mother to their three children.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1991
The largest food-borne cholera outbreak to appear in the United States since the beginning of a massive epidemic in South America was confirmed by New Jersey state health officials yesterday.Eight people, from Jersey City and West New York, became ill earlier this month after consuming illegally imported crab meat from Ecuador. Four were later diagnosed as suffering from cholera, a potentiallyfatal disease whose symptoms include severe diarrhea and vomiting leading to dehydration.All the victims recovered.
HEALTH
By Melissa Healy | August 28, 2014
The National Institutes of Health has announced the first clinical trial of a vaccine to protect healthy people from infection by the Ebola virus, which is responsible for an estimated 1,550 deaths throughout West Africa. NIH Director Francis Collins on Thursday called the human safety trials, which are to start next week in Bethesda, the latest in a series of the "extraordinary measures to accelerate the pace of vaccine clinical trials" for the public health emergency in Africa.
FEATURES
By Amber Dance | August 16, 2007
That laser printer sitting on your desk could be emitting high levels of potentially hazardous particles, according to a study published this month. Some printers released almost as many ultra-fine particles as a smoldering cigarette, the study authors said. There have been few studies on the health hazards of printing, and the current research, appearing in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, provides the most extensive look yet at particle emissions of office printers, including Canon, Hewlett-Packard, Ricoh and Toshiba models.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
NEWS
November 3, 2007
Johns Hopkins University faculty will offer 32 presentations covering issues in prevention, treatment and diagnosis of diseases affecting women from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. today at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Topics of the 13th annual health conference, titled "A Woman's Journey," include aging, heart disease, breast cancer, global warming, stress, weight loss and depression. The keynote speaker is Leslie Mancuso, president and chief executive officer of JHPIEGO, a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health organization that works to improve health care conditions in 50 countries.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Promotions Thomas A. LaVeist has been installed as the inaugural William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Poli cy at the Johns Hop kins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The med ical sociologist was also the inaugural recipient of the Knowledge Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health. LaVeist, an expert on health disparities and the prob lems in minority communi ties, has been on the Hop kins faculty since 1990. His latest book, Minority Popu lations and Health: An In troduction to Health Dis parities in the United States, was published in April 2005.
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