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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Dr. Richard Harold Morrow Jr., a physician and Johns Hopkins public health official and who had worked in Ghana and Uganda, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 17 at his home in the Bare Hills section of Baltimore County. He was 81. Hopkins colleagues described him as a pioneer in international public health. He was the recipient of a 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Public Health Association's International Health Section. "He was a man of both humility and brilliance," said Dr. Adnan A. Hyder, a Hopkins professor of international health, who lives in Lutherville.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
Dr. Melvyn C. Thorne, a semiretired professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health who was interested in maternal child care and family planning in developing countries, died Aug. 16 of a heart attack at his Roland Park home. He was 77. The son of a mechanic and a homemaker, Dr. Thorne was born and raised in San Francisco. After graduation in 1950 from Lowell High School, he worked his way to Europe aboard a freighter. "He had decided not to go to college and spent time bicycling and traveling throughout Europe," said his wife of 52 years, the former Dorothy Richardson, an educator he met when both were students at the University of California at Berkeley.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1991
Millions of turtle eggs exported from the United States to be hatched and the turtles sold as pets may harbor strains of salmonella bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and could pose a serious international health threat to young children, U.S. and Canadian health officials say.Salmonella carried by healthy reptiles and livestock can infect people and cause severe abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. The condition is rarely fatal in adults, but in young children it can require hospitalization.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
They appear in health club ads, fit, trim and tanned, with impossibly taut abdomens. They show up less often in real life.The typical health club member rarely resembles Madison Avenue's toned-up version, Roger Ralph learned long ago. As owner of a Harford County club with his wife, Elaine, Ralph set out in the early 1980s to create an environment in which fitness is more a lifestyle than a quest to build muscles.Today, the Ralphs' Bel Air Athletic Club is considered a trend-setter in the industry, a model of the health club of the 21st century.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
After years of complex research, a small team of University of Maryland scientists says it has developed a simple solution to a killer Third World disease using salt. It's a bit more complicated than ordinary table salt, though the crystals have the same origins. The salt forms around an ancient microbe that has been genetically manipulated to act as a vaccine for salmonella, responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths a year globally. Discovered decades ago and the subject of intense research by many scientists, the microbe, called Haloarchaea, turns out to be such a good platform for vaccines that it could be employed against a variety of afflictions in poor and rich countries alike, said Shiladitya DasSarma, professor of microbiology and immunology in Maryland's School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2003
In what would be one of the largest health-care fraud settlements in U.S. history, Abbott Laboratories will pay more than $600 million to resolve allegations that it worked with medical-care providers to bilk government health insurance programs for the poor and elderly. The medical products giant disclosed late yesterday that it would take a one-time second-quarter charge of $622 million, or 34 cents a share, as a result of an anticipated settlement of civil and criminal allegations against its Ross Products nutrition business.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today described war-ravaged Kuwait as a country darkened by clouds of smoke, littered with live ammunition and reeling from destruction at the hands of the Iraqi military."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 1996
Smoking will become the single largest cause of death and disability in the world within the next 25 years, according to the first comprehensive, global study of how people die.Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes -- often thought to strike primarily the affluent -- already cause more deaths in the developing world than infectious diseases, the five-year study showed.The study, done by a team headquartered at the Harvard University School of Public Health and released yesterday, found that depression, also associated with affluence, accounts for 10 percent of productive years lost throughout the world.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Georgia man with a highly infectious strain of tuberculosis, whose travels last month caused an international health scare, told Congress yesterday that he had no idea he was contagious. "I don't want this, and I wouldn't have wanted to give it to someone else," said Andrew Speaker, a 31-year-old Atlanta lawyer who is under quarantine at a Denver hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "knew that I had this. ... I was repeatedly told I was not contagious, that I was not a threat to anyone," he said.
FEATURES
July 29, 1991
Who: Nancy and Larry FittonAges: 38 and 44 respectivelyFrom: Long GreenAssignment: Honduras, 1976-79Larry taught photography at Pan American Agricultural School, known as Zamorano. Nancy taught nutrition to village women, produced audio-visual materials and conducted workshops for auxiliary nurses in the capital, Tegucigalpa.Update: She earned master's in international health at Johns Hopkins and later worked for Pan American Health Organization and World Vision in Costa Rica before becoming full-time mother to their three children.
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