Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInterior Design
IN THE NEWS

Interior Design

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The woman behind the interiors of many of Baltimore's significant buildings celebrates this year the 15th anniversary of the founding of her business, Portnoy Levine Design Associates or PLDA. Raised in Connecticut and educated at the Pratt Institute in New York, Portnoy struck out on her own in 1998. Her business now employs nine people at its St. Paul Street offices and counts among its dozens of clients the University of Maryland, for which its work includes the School of Journalism, the new Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore and the forthcoming bioengineering building.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
To Michelle Miller, urban interior design is all about working with light and architecture to create space. The Baltimore resident and award-winning home decor professional spoke with Chesapeake Home + Living about creating easier, more comfortable living in open lofts and narrow row houses. How would you describe your particular style? I call my style "warm modern.” I love using natural materials in a very clean and sophisticated way. Quality over quantity. Always. What do you do in a first client consultation?
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
To Michelle Miller, urban interior design is all about working with light and architecture to create space. The Baltimore resident and award-winning home decor professional spoke with Chesapeake Home + Living about creating easier, more comfortable living in open lofts and narrow row houses. How would you describe your particular style? I call my style "warm modern.” I love using natural materials in a very clean and sophisticated way. Quality over quantity. Always. What do you do in a first client consultation?
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
When Evelyn Gorman bought her then-10-year-old contemporary brick townhouse in Ruxton 25 years ago, change was the first order of business. To this seasoned interior designer from New York City, there was no reason not to create everything in her style - one she calls "country French in an eclectic, sophisticated approach. " The obvious starting point was getting rid of the 1980s kitchen that was prominently avocado green. "I have always tried to be true to my own design concepts," said the award-winning designer and former interior design columnist for the Baltimore Jewish Times.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | December 3, 2008
Marjorie F. Katzen, a Baltimore interior designer and longtime Pikesville resident, died of a heart attack caused by an infection Nov. 25 at Sinai Hospital. She was 53. Ms. Katzen was born in Baltimore and raised in Northwest Baltimore and Pikesville. She was a 1973 graduate of Pikesville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in interior design from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1977. Ms. Katzen began her career working as an interior designer at Grand Rapids Furniture.
NEWS
By Charlotte Moler and Charlotte Moler,Contributing Writer | September 4, 1994
This fall, as leaves begin to change their hues, another metamorphosis will be happening in Harford County.On the crest of a hill in the heart of Bel Air, the Homestead, a stately three-story house of granite and slate that has been home to some of the county's most prominent families, is being transformed by a volunteer team of professional interior designers.The designers are preparing the Homestead to be the 1994 Decorator Show House in a home tour to benefit the Harford County chapter of the AMC Cancer Research Center.
NEWS
February 28, 2004
Carol Ann Denick, an interior designer and longtime Reisterstown resident, died of cancer Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 47. She was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1975 graduate of St. Timothy's School and earned a bachelor's degree in interior design from Ohio University in 1979. After spending a year in Israel volunteering and studying, she returned to Baltimore in the early 1980s and established Paper Hang Up, a wallpaper and interior design store.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | June 1, 1994
Lately, for Maryl Harshey good things have been coming in bunches.Not only is her interior design studio, Maryl Interiors in Westminster, the first in Carroll County to become licensed under a new state law, but the owner has been inducted as a professional into the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID)."I've been waiting for this for so long," Ms. Harshey said.For several years, ASID pushed Maryland's legislators to license designers and hold them to a professional standard, as is done with hair stylists, Ms. Harshey said.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 31, 1991
Donald Craig Arenth, 57, a highly regarded interior designer who created spaces as diverse as the Center Club when it was at 1 Charles Center, the Kuwaiti Sheraton Hotel and the Foreign Affairs Building of Brunei, in Southeast Asia, died yesterday after a long illness.Mr. Arenth, of Bolton Hill, died at the Kingsville home of a friend, Frederick C. Petrich, a voice teacher with whom he had studied. He had been a patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital from Oct. 22 until Monday.A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Feb. 10 at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Hill.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
J.H.L. Chambers II, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the H. Chambers Co., one of Maryland's largest interior design companies, died Wednesday at his home in the Bahamas after a three-year battle with cancer.Affectionately referred to by friends as the last "great English gentleman," the 66-year-old Baltimore native was a man of impeccable appearance and manners and a member of the national Lacrosse Hall of Fame."He was the consummate gentleman," said H. Mebane Turner, president of the University of Baltimore, who met Mr. Chambers while playing squash about 25 years ago."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Frances W. Riepe, a former interior decorator who had been a trustee of Ladew Topiary Gardens, died May 16 of congestive heart failure at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 91. The daughter of Francis Asbury Warner Jr., founder of the Warner-Graham Co., and Elsie McGee Warner, a homemaker, the former Frances Warner was born in Baltimore and raised on Hollen Road in Cedarcroft. She attended Bryn Mawr School and graduated in 1941 from the Knox School in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1946, she married George Mitchell Stump Riepe, who later became president of the Warner-Graham Co. Mrs. Riepe earned a certificate in 1964 from the New York School of Interior Design and owned and operated an interior decorating firm from her Guilford home.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The woman behind the interiors of many of Baltimore's significant buildings celebrates this year the 15th anniversary of the founding of her business, Portnoy Levine Design Associates or PLDA. Raised in Connecticut and educated at the Pratt Institute in New York, Portnoy struck out on her own in 1998. Her business now employs nine people at its St. Paul Street offices and counts among its dozens of clients the University of Maryland, for which its work includes the School of Journalism, the new Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore and the forthcoming bioengineering building.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Pnina Wilkins, an interior designer and past president of Hadassah, died Feb. 22 of heart failure at Seasons Hospice in Randallstown. She was 90. The daughter of Benjamin Laikin, a wiping cloths manufacturer, and Anna Golomb Laikin, a homemaker, Pnina Laikin was born in Baltimore and later moved with her family to Detroit. After graduating from high school in Detroit, she attended the University of Wisconsin at Madison for a year. She left Wisconsin after she met her future husband, Stanley Wilkins, in Atlantic City, N.J., during a family vacation.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Like many empty-nesters, Karyn and Don Haasen flirted with the idea of a change in lifestyle - the kind that comes with a new home in a different locale. In their case, the move was from suburban Bel Air to a renovated rowhouse in the Upper Fells Point area. "Don and I spent a lot of our free time, when we were still living in Bel Air, exploring various towns, festivals, art shows, restaurants, museums, [and] flea markets, always dreaming …that it would be fun to live in a place where we could walk to everything," Karyn Haasen recalled.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Susan G. Doud, an interior designer and longtime Cockeysville resident, died Saturday of liver cancer at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 70. The former Susan Garson, who was the daughter of Richard J. Garson, a businessman, and Joan Jobst Garson, an educator, was born in Baltimore and raised on Tredegar Avenue in Catonsville. She attended Julie Billiart Country Day School in Ellicott City and St. Mark's School in Catonsville, and graduated in 1961 from Trinity Preparatory School in Ellicott City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Literary legend has it that James Michener saw a great blue heron above the St. Michaels property he was inspecting and immediately decided to buy the 25 acres and the old house that sat on a creek off the Choptank River, near the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. It was an omen, he is said to have concluded. This would be where he researched and wrote his next expansive historical novel, "Chesapeake," which would be published in 1978. He called the retreat "Southwind" for the unceasing breeze that blew up the bay. It was the same kind of epiphany that struck Dr. Paul and Anne Yarbrough Gurbel of Baltimore, who had been searching for a weekend home in St. Michaels for two years.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
There's an interior design firm that has developed a near-infallibleresearch technique for finding out what people really like.Admittedly, the procedure is an ancient one, a low-tech way of doing business generally overlooked by most people in this computer-driven information age of ours, but it can be surprisingly effective.The technique, known as talking to people, is one that the proprietors of the Annapolis-based Bishopsgate R & R, Richard Garis and RicAltemus, an interior design and antique retail firm, say works very well for them.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 4, 2008
Daniele J. Fleischer, owner of a Harford County interior design firm, died Monday of a stroke at her Bel Air home. She was 66. Daniele Jeanne Lemarie was born in St. Maur, France, and raised in Paris. She studied art and design in France. In 1958, she married Pete Thrasher. The marriage ended in divorce. She came to Baltimore in 1963, returned to France for several years, then returned to the city in 1966. She was a designer for Shaivitz Furniture from 1975 to 1985 and then was design director for DGI, a design firm, for a year.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
The 2013 Howard County Decorator Show House at Mount Ida showcases the work of the following interior designers: Antique Center at Historic Savage Mill Savage 410-880-0918, antiquecentersavage.com Daniel F. Liggon Associates, LLC Pikesville 410-484-2992 Dare Designs Baltimore 410-233-0679 The Decorating Therapist Carol Weil Columbia 410-992-9252, thedecoratingtherapist.com Deelite Design,...
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
 With her Maltipoo, Brooks, tucked under her arm, Stephanie Bradshaw was ready to get down to business. Three employees were buzzing about her Clipper Mill office, preparing for a bridal photo shoot. Bradshaw rattled off questions about the session, scheduled for later that day at the Four Seasons Baltimore. Nearby lay the props: oversized dominoes and mounds of candies. Just as quickly, her attention turned to an upcoming fashion event she's styling at Towson Town Center.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.