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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Dan Deacon's live shows have always incorporated the crowd, whether it's a dance battle among fans or a call-and-response chanting session. But now he's taken the crowd interaction a step further with his first app. Available for iPhone and Android systems, the free app turns a user's phone into a color-changing glowstick. The app - developed by Deacon and other Wham City members including app-programmer Keith Lea, Patrick McMinn, Alan Resnick and Robert O'Brien - is available now, and it doesn't require Wi-Fi or data usage.
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NEWS
September 24, 2014
Legislation introduced Monday in the City Council would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year. Though the proposal leaves many questions unanswered regarding how evidence from the devices could be used, who would have access to it and, not insignificantly, how the new equipment would be paid for, we think on balance that the benefits of the technology far outweigh the costs both in terms of improving police-community relations...
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NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2001
THE SUMMER session of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's program A Family Place will begin this week at the Brooklyn branch, 300 E. Patapsco Ave. A Family Place is a five-week program that promotes parent-child interaction and child development. It is sponsored by Libraries for the Future, a nationwide nonprofit library advocacy group. The program, which begins Saturday, was introduced to the Pratt system in 1998 at the Brooklyn and Cherry Hill branches and became so successful that the Pratt now offers the program at its Central Library and at eight community libraries.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 31, 2002
Q. I have been self-medicating with Saint-John's-wort for several months to deal with mild seasonal depression and job-hunting stress. The Saint-John's-wort seems to be helping. I take it morning and evening. I also take Zocor at bedtime. Is there any interaction between Saint-John's-wort and my cholesterol-lowering drug? If so, should I not be taking the herb at all, or should I take it at a different time to have less of an effect on Zocor? My pharmacist and I await your wisdom. A. Saint-John's-wort lowers the blood levels of Zocor, and this might reduce its effectiveness.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | March 22, 2007
Talk shows began to fascinate me when I was a teenager, many years ago. The first was the old radio program, The University of Chicago Roundtable. Over the years I also began to listen to Meet the Press and to watch David Susskind's television roundtable program, Open End, and many others. In more recent years, I can't bear to watch most of the talk shows on television, and on radio I listen only to Rush Limbaugh and a couple of others. What has happened? Is it just my becoming ornery in my old age, or have the programs changed?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Curtis Rist and Curtis Rist,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2001
Just now, Victor Zue's computer sits on his desk at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Computer Science - but he doesn't expect it to stay there much longer. Computers are already beginning to shrink drastically. Zue believes that tiny but powerful computers will soon be embedded in the walls of offices and homes, in handheld devices that look like cell phones, and in even the most mundane appliances. Even an alarm clock, he believes, will soon develop a computer-assisted attitude: Connected to the Internet, it will be able to check your schedule, cross-reference it with traffic reports and decide what time to awaken you. Zue says that "even more remarkable than the things we'll be doing with all these computers will be the way we interact with them.
NEWS
By Anthony Flint and Anthony Flint,BOSTON GLOBE | January 7, 1996
When Robert D. Putnam quit as dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government three years ago, he gave the usual line about wanting to return to life as a scholar. But it was no mere face-saving rhetoric.During the last year Mr. Putnam has become one of the leading academic observers of American political life, quoted by Anthony Lewis and George Will alike, even praised in the pages of People magazine.He's done it by grabbing hold of what promises to be a fundamental underlying issue in the next presidential campaign, and that is the cynicism and disaffection that keep so many Americans from engaging in any kind of civic or political activity today, much less actually casting a vote.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | October 10, 1999
Q. Several years ago, my father had surgery on his carotid artery. He has been on the blood thinner Cou-madin since then.Recently he suffered from nighttime leg cramps and had a fainting spell while attending an outing on a hot, humid day. When he told his physician, the doctor prescribed quinine for the leg cramps and increased his Coumadin from three tablets to four a day.The pharmacy warned of a possible quinine-Coumadin interaction. Although I informed my father's physician of this, he took no immediate corrective action.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | March 8, 1993
It's hardly earth-shattering to claim that where you hang out and whom you hang out with determine much of your destiny. ("Where you stand depends on where you sit," goes the old adage.) That said, it is surprising that most managers fail to give physical factors their strategic due. What a blunder!Put the following space management issues atop your agenda, and you can initiate dramatic changes in corporate culture, even in big institutions, almost overnight:* Encourage interaction. A new facility in Austin, Texas, is home to 3M's electronics sector.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Throwing a party is no reason to panic ­ - or spend a fortune. One of Chef Nikki McGowan's go-to party dishes is a huge pot of mussels, which she loves because they are simple to prepare and inexpensive - but also delicious and fun to eat.  McGowan, who teaches cooking classes for kids and adults at CKCS Foods (ckcsweb.com), serves the mussels in big bowls with lots of bread for dipping. Kids love getting a little messy, and even the less-adventurous eaters can be coaxed into dipping a piece of crusty bread into the sauce.  For adults, the dish's exotic flavors are a hit. And for the host, mussels mean only a few minutes in the kitchen - and a small price tag, even when feeding a crowd.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 9, 2014
Shirley Johannesen Levine sways back and forth at the Ellicott City Senior Center, her arms moving to the left and then the right as she recites the classic nursery rhyme, "Old Mother Hubbard. " "Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard to give her poor dog a bone," she said with a voice deeper than her normal tone. "That's me. " Then, she pants. Child-like giggles spread erupt from the audience - members of the Senior Center Plus social day program and the Athelas Institute, a community center that provides vocational, educational, residential and recreational programs for adults with disabilities.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 27, 2013
The emotional component of the crises that occur in the city all too often winds up in a North Avenue grief counseling room. This destination for some needed healing is little known in the world of Baltimore philanthropic circles. But that will be changing. I spent time this week at Roberta's House, a comfort zone located in the heart of the neighborhoods where these sadnesses often begin. I spoke with Annette March-Grier, who named her project after her late mother, Roberta March, who was known as a loving matriarch among Baltimore's African-American morticians.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Over the years there have any number of citizen complaints about police use of excessive force and other misconduct, including some high-profile cases where suspects died while in custody. But too often investigations into such complaints end in a situation where it's the witnesses' word against the officers', leaving neither side feeling that justice has been done. That's why we were intrigued by Baltimore City Del. Frank Conaway Jr.'s proposal last week to require police in Maryland to wear tiny cameras that record all their interactions with the public.
NEWS
August 18, 2013
A group of do-gooders has picked Maryland as its test case for trying to make state and local government more transparent and participatory using technology, and they've already made some inroads in improving the way state and local laws are published on the web. But the source of this effort may surprise some in this deep blue state: Rep. Darrell Issa, the California Republican who serves as one of President Barack Obama's chief antagonists in Congress....
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
HAVANA -- So much for subtle political overtones.The Orioles had hoped to cast yesterday's historic exhibition game against members of the Cuban national team as a nonpolitical, people-to-people event, but the high-profile presence of Cuban President Fidel Castro at Latin American Stadium nearly overshadowed the baseball dimension of the goodwill trip.The Orioles worked overtime to score an 11-inning, 3-2 victory before a crowd of more than 50,000, but some of the most interesting action -- or interaction -- took place about 50 feet behind home plate, where Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, baseball Commissioner Bud Selig and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke sat with Castro throughout the four-hour game.
NEWS
May 22, 1997
Six Carroll County representatives from Heifer Project International attended a White House reception May 5 as part of a three-day InterAction Forum in Alexandria, Va.InterAction is a nonprofit association of 155 nongovernment and relief and development organizations.Heifer Project, based at Brethren Service Center in New Windsor, helps families become self-sufficient for food and income.Attending from the service center were: Mark Lancaster, chairman of the board for Heifer Project International; and John Dieterly, regional director.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Morgan Lane Arnold, an emotionally frail 14-year-old freshman, navigated the hallways of her Howard County high school each day filled with anxiety, unable because of a learning disorder to decipher the social cues, jokes and emotions of her peers. Her preferred environment, often accented by a Japanese anime soundtrack streaming through snug earplugs, featured a mix of fairies, mermaids and vampires, according to her mother. They were the protagonists of a digital realm where she said she was "practicing making friends" through role-playing games and social media.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Before Lauren Preston opened the cover of the book "Spring" to read to her pre-kindergarten class at Mary Ann Winterling Elementary School, her students excitedly told her why, and showed her how, the season was underway. Daffodils - not just "yellow flowers" - were appearing from beneath the soil, they said. Hyacinths were blooming, they demonstrated with the slow unfolding of their tiny fists. And butterflies were emerging, the students showed by flapping their curled arms. In pre-K classrooms around Baltimore's school system, subtle changes like interactive reading are having a substantial effect in helping prepare 4-year-olds for elementary school - addressing an achievement gap that city schools have faced for years.
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