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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 8, 2005
PUT YOURSELF in Mike Bolesta's place. On the morning of Feb. 20, he buys a new radio-CD player for his 17-year-old son Christopher's car. He pays the $114 installation charge with 57 crisp new $2 bills, which, when last observed, were still considered legitimate currency in the United States proper. The $2 bills are Bolesta's idea of payment, and his little comic protest, too. For this, Bolesta, Baltimore County resident, innocent citizen, owner of Capital City Student Tours, finds himself under arrest.
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NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A project to install emergency generators at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage is scheduled to begin Monday. Three 2,500-kilowatt emergency power generators and 15-kilovolt switchgear will be installed to provide a third power source for the plant, in the event the two independent Baltimore Gas and Electric power feeds are disrupted, according to a news release from the county. The generators are part of the county's $8.1 million electrical protection system upgrade in an effort to safeguard the Water Reclamation Plant from outages that could lead to sewage overflows, such as that which occurred during Superstorm Sandy.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 24, 2012
A state program will begin offering instruction on properly installing child safety seats via video chat, potentially reaching parents who can't get to an inspection event. The program will begin April 30 as a pilot. Parents can sign up for a free Skype account and make an appointment for a chat by calling 1-800-370-SEAT. The parents will also have to complete a participant confirmation form. The parents, sitting in view of their car seat with their smart phone or laptop, will get a call.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
Starting in May, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. will begin installing "smart meters" in a huge undertaking intended to modernize Central Maryland's electricity grid and save customers money by helping them control energy use. The three-year, $482 million rollout is scheduled to begin in Pasadena and continue in stages until 1.3 million analog electric meters are replaced with digital ones and 700,000 gas meters are upgraded by the end of 2014....
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
Dear Mr. Azrael: I have had several issues regarding encroachment on both sides of my Baltimore County home. The latest issue concerns the developer, who has encroached on my property by six to seven feet to install my neighbor's driveway. I called the county inspector, explaining the developer was attempting to encroach on property the developer sold to me. I asked that the property be resurveyed at his cost to identify the encroachment. I also have asked that no driveway be installed on my property.
NEWS
May 9, 1995
The Carroll County Bureau of Utilities has reduced the installation cost for a sludge press at the Freedom District Water Treatment Plant by having the staff do most of the work.Instead of putting the entire project out to bid, one staff member suggested having the staff install the sludge press and bid only the rigging and electrical work.The idea reduced the cost of the project to $31,000 for installation and $40,000 for masonry repairs, piping and other materials. The $71,000 cost is $50,000 below the original proposal for the project.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
ATLANTA - Lowe's and Home Depot want to bring their battle for home improvement supremacy into your house or condo. Call it "Install Wars," with big bucks at stake. The rivals are seeking to expand the amount of business they get from customers willing to pay someone to install wall-to-wall carpet, floors, roofing, kitchen cabinets and other home improvement products. Atlanta-based Home Depot, which began pushing its at-home services nearly two years ago, has a comfortable cushion in installation sales.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | January 29, 1991
The elusive -- indeed, perhaps the illusory -- boundary separating architecture and art is central to the aesthetic of Baltimore artist Tim Thompson, who has built a new installation on display at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery through March 3.Commissioned by the college in honor of the new Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Arts Center, Mr. Thompson's installation is a series of four walls covered with a corrugated fiberglass. These are positioned to create the illusion that they bisect the asymmetrical walls of the gallery, inviting myriad contemplations of the relationships between the installation and the space it inhabits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Crews are installing state-of-the-art parking meters in downtown Washington, replacing old and damaged meters in an effort to recover lost revenue - and to bolster the battered image of the nation's capital.Only 7,000 of the city's almost 16,000 parking meters work. Many have been vandalized, causing a decline in parking revenues from $1 million a month in 1995 to $260,000 a month in October 1997.The city's Financial Control Board, which oversees many municipal operations, contracted Lockheed Martin IMS, primarily known as one of the nation's major aerospace companies, to install vandal-resistant meters.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Baltimore neighborhoods Mount Vernon and Pimlico and Baltimore County's Bowley's Quarters will be the first to receive new water meters as part of system-wide overhaul, city officials said Tuesday. Beginning in September, crews will install about 5,000 new meters in the city and 5,000 in the county, officials said. The new meters will use wireless technology. Residents will be able to continuously check their water use online, the city said. The installations are part of an $83.5 million contract with Itron Inc. to upgrade Baltimore's water-meter system.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Harried commuters will be gratified by the Maryland Public Service Commission's decision last week to require taxicabs operating in Baltimore City to install credit card-reading devices in the back seat where passengers sit. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of the year, will allow customers to just swipe a Mastercard or Visa to pay the fare rather than having to carry cash. It's a convenience riders in other cities have long enjoyed, and it has probably taken a lot of the anxiety out of hailing a cab. It's about time Baltimore caught up with the trend.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Alice Johnson noticed the checker boards that recently popped up behind her house, a neat brick rowhouse in the Barclay neighborhood of Baltimore. "People will definitely use them," she said. "I play. I wish I could play chess, too. " She should have time to learn. The boards have been etched permanently into 1,000-pound slabs of marble in a new community courtyard. The stones are salvaged steps from several area houses, and the artist who placed them in the courtyard hopes they become a new kind of Baltimore front steps - where urban dwellers have long gathered, told stories and played games.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Despite a slow start to the season away from Ripken Stadium, short-season Single-A Aberdeen will receive a lot of attention when the club returns home this weekend. After going 1-5 on a six-game road trip to begin the year, the IronBirds will host Brooklyn in a 7:35 p.m. game Friday. On Saturday night, top prospect Dylan Bundy will pitch for Aberdeen. And there will be a new "Ripken orange" glow in the outfield. The IronBirds, who changed their colors this season to match the Orioles' orange-and-black scheme , completed the installation of orange padding -- called "Ripken orange" in a news release -- on the outfield fence at the ballpark Thursday.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
Brigadier General Bruce T. Crawford officially assumed command of the Army Communications-Electronics Command and of Aberdeen Proving Ground on Tuesday during a 10 a.m. ceremony at the post's C4ISR Center of Excellence Campus. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the Army Materiel Command, presided over the ceremony and welcomed Crawford to the AMC family. Both generals greeted the more than 400 soldiers, dignitaries, employees and assembled guests. "Brig. Gen. Crawford knows communications, he knows the warfighter and he is well respected within the Army's Signal community and the Joint C4 [command, control, communications, computers]
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1998
When Diane Turner heard that four out of five child safety seats statewide are improperly used, the 40-year-old mother worried that hers was one.So she brought her Mazda, the seat and her 2-year-old daughter, Paris McKinney, to a drive-through safety program yesterday and watched experts install her seat correctly."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
The Westminster Common Council agreed yesterday to spend $11,408 for the purchase and installation of a refurbished bronze bell at the city's new firehouse.After listening to a presentation by Robert Schultz, a member of Westminster Fire Engine and Hose Company No. 1, the council voted 4-0 to buy a 900-pound Meneeley bell for $10,500 and pay $908 for delivery and installation.The money approved yesterday was about $2,400 more than the council had allocated for the purchase in June. The council had set aside $9,000 for the bell in this year's fiscal budget.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Energy supplier Constellation said Thursday that it added 38 megawatts of solar generation last year for business and government customers, including 3.6 megawatts in Maryland. Constellation, the Baltimore-based subsidiary of Exelon Corp., said its solar projects in operation or underway now top 164 megawatts. The company built projects last year in Arizona, California, New York and D.C. in addition to a local solar installation for the University of Maryland Medical System. Constellation owns and operates the projects, and its customers purchase the power.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
For those looking for a fairly simple and pain-free resolution for the new year, here's one: Get a carbon monoxide detector for your home or business or both. If you already have one, perhaps it's time to change the batteries or at least test them. On one single day this month - Thursday, Dec. 19 to be exact - a total of 10 people were taken to local hospitals after carbon monoxide leaks in their Baltimore County homes. The two incidents, both in Dundalk but otherwise unrelated, involved faulty furnaces.
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