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Innocence

NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 26, 1994
I'm disappointed to learn that I blindly missed a defining moment in American history.This has come to my attention in the many gushing reviews of a new movie called "Quiz Show."The movie is loosely based on the true story of how a popular TV quiz show from the 1950s called "Twenty-One" was rigged to heighten suspense and boost ratings and profits.Most of the critics say the movie is of great significance because the quiz-show scandal marked the loss of our national innocence.Americans were supposedly stunned to discover that they couldn't believe everything they saw on their rabbit-eared TV sets.
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SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Sometimes, doing what is right can be done for the wrong reasons.Sometimes, doing what is right can be done at the wrong time,Sometimes, doing what is right can be made to look self-serving and hypocritical.Sometimes, doing what is right is not nearly as simple as it seems.Which brings us to the case of Temple University and a freshman student named William Cunningham.What separates Cunningham from most students at Temple is his size. He is 6 feet 11 and, depending upon his previous meal, around 270 pounds.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2000
ATLANTA -- Today's court hearing is billed as a routine bail review for Ray Lewis, its sole purpose to determine whether the Baltimore Ravens linebacker should remain jailed until his trial on murder charges. But nothing has been routine in this free-wheeling odyssey of a flamboyant young football star who was consorting with two convicted felons when he got caught up in a fracas that led to a double killing after a Super Bowl party. High-priced defense lawyers plan to use the hearing as a referendum on Lewis' proclaimed innocence -- a maneuver that could turn a typically dry court appearance into a show worthy of tabloid television.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
A Texan on death row asked the Supreme Court to grant him a new hearing on the basis of new evidence his lawyers obtained 10 years after his trial. He says it shows he is innocent of the murder for which he was convicted and sentenced to death. The court turned him down.Given the high court's previous interpretations of the Constitution on the death penalty and timetables for appeals, this was no doubt the right decision to make: The new evidence cited in this case by the death row inmate was not compelling, and the inmate had long ago lost several post-conviction appeals.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
A post-conviction hearing for death-row inmate Kevin Wiggins took an unusual turn yesterday when his new attorneys called a Baltimore County prosecutor as a witness.At issue was a failed lie-detector test by Wiggins' former girlfriend, Geraldine M. Armstrong of Randallstown. She was arrested and charged with him in the 1988 murder and robbery of a 77-year-old Woodlawn woman, but testified against Wiggins and was not prosecuted.Ms. Armstrong appeared briefly Monday, but invoked her constitutional protection against self-incrimination when asked point-blank questions about whether she was involved in the killing.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | August 21, 1992
London--Everybody in England is in his usual place: God is in his heaven; the queen is in her palace; and Sarah Ferguson is back on the front pages.Once again the errant daughter-in-law of the queen of England, reluctant and tempestuous wife of Prince Andrew the hapless, has hit the tabloids, and even the front pages of the quality press.Topless she is and, for want of a more delicate description, in a posture of carnal enthusiasm.And with an American no less -- 37-year-old oil tycoon JohnBryan who proves, if nothing else, that bald men can be appealing to a British blue blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
Kirk Bloodsworth of Cambridge is a wanted man again. The press wants him. Geraldo wants him. Congress wants him. They all want him to talk, just tell his story one more time for the record. He is an expert on his life story, and the public is prepared to believe him now. Kirk Noble Bloodsworth is telling the truth. "I'm having great difficulty putting my life together," Bloodsworth testified last month before a House subcommittee on crime. Congress is considering a bill, called the Innocence Protection Act, that would ensure convicted offenders have a chance to prove their innocence through DNA testing.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2002
Bernard Webster, who was released from prison last week after serving 20 years for a Baltimore County rape he did not commit, was probably not the only innocent person trapped behind the walls of Maryland's prisons, his attorneys say. Michele Nethercott, Webster's lawyer and the head of the Maryland public defender's Innocence Project, which attempts to identify and free those wrongly convicted, said she has seen DNA test results showing other inmates' innocence....
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 23, 2000
A Glen Burnie man who murdered his wife and the next day took his lover and 11-year-old son to see the violent film "Pulp Fiction" was sentenced Friday to life in prison. David A. Dicus, 41, gazed at his son Lucas, 15, as he was led in handcuffs from a packed Anne Arundel County circuit courtroom after Judge Ronald A. Silkworth pronounced the sentence. Dicus was convicted in November of strangling his wife, Terry L. Keefer, on July 28, 1995, and dumping her body near Scaggsville. At the trial, his lover testified that Dicus killed his wife because a lawyer had told him he would not win sole custody of their son in the divorce he was contemplating.
SPORTS
October 10, 1991
This bet stinksNow, for the obligatory story about the obligatory bebetween politicians in cities whose teams are involved in postseason play:Pittsburgh councilmen Bernard "Baldy" Regan and Duane Darkins have wagered a day on a garbage truck that the Pirates will beat the Atlanta Braves in the National League playoffs.If the Braves win, Regan and Darkins will spend a day picking up Atlanta garbage. If the Pirates win, Atlanta Councilman Bill Campbell will do the dirty work in Pittsburgh.Politicians and garbage . . . nah, it's too obvious.
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