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Innocence

NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 8, 2000
SAN JOSE, Calif. - For 16 years, Glen "Buddy" Nickerson has been in prison, serving a life sentence for one of Santa Clara County's most notorious murders. Like many convicts, Nickerson has insisted that he is innocent, while local law enforcement officials have always been confident that a jury got it right when it convicted him. But in the latest twist in the county's most enduring, expensive and troubled murder case, Nickerson and his legal team have assembled new evidence to cast doubt on his conviction for his role in a wild 1984 gunfight that left two men dead and set off years of still-unresolved courtroom drama.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber Mike Littwin of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | December 16, 1990
It's called The Box, a sweltering, dimly lit gymnasium with a hard-court floor smudged dark brown, two half-moon-shaped backboards and four brick walls.This is where David Wingate began a basketball journey, reaching each step on a path that stretched from the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center in East Baltimore, to Dunbar High School, to Georgetown University, to the National Basketball Association.In September, Wingate was on the verge of securing his financial future, coming within 48 hours of signing a three-year,$2.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 26, 1994
I'm disappointed to learn that I blindly missed a defining moment in American history.This has come to my attention in the many gushing reviews of a new movie called "Quiz Show."The movie is loosely based on the true story of how a popular TV quiz show from the 1950s called "Twenty-One" was rigged to heighten suspense and boost ratings and profits.Most of the critics say the movie is of great significance because the quiz-show scandal marked the loss of our national innocence.Americans were supposedly stunned to discover that they couldn't believe everything they saw on their rabbit-eared TV sets.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Trying make sure that innocent individuals are not executed, the Supreme Court opened the federal courthouse door slightly wider yesterday for inmates who claim they did not commit the crimes.In a 5-4 decision that the majority said will apply only to "truly extraordinary" cases, the court gave a Missouri death-row inmate a new chance to convince a federal judge that he did not murder another inmate in the cellblock.The inmate insists that he was standing in the prison cafeteria at the time and that he has a videotape to prove it.The ruling involves state prison inmates whose challenges to their convictions ordinarily would be barred entirely from federal courts because the inmates could not satisfy the Supreme Court's increasingly tight limits on access to those courts.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Sometimes, doing what is right can be done for the wrong reasons.Sometimes, doing what is right can be done at the wrong time,Sometimes, doing what is right can be made to look self-serving and hypocritical.Sometimes, doing what is right is not nearly as simple as it seems.Which brings us to the case of Temple University and a freshman student named William Cunningham.What separates Cunningham from most students at Temple is his size. He is 6 feet 11 and, depending upon his previous meal, around 270 pounds.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
A former Baltimore County police chemist, whose work is being questioned by a nationally renowned legal clinic, left the department four months after acknowledging she did not understand the science of her forensic tests and that her blood work in a death-penalty case was "worthless," court papers show. Some local defense attorneys and officials with the Innocence Project, the New York-based clinic, say that this 1987 testimony, during a pretrial hearing in Robert Bedford's murder case, raises more warning flags about Concepcion Bacasnot's forensic work, and about how the former chemist may have affected Baltimore County defendants throughout the 1980s.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
With his shackles finally off, a smiling but dazed-looking Bernard Webster walked out of court yesterday and into a world for which, after 20 years of wrongful imprisonment, he was stunningly ill-equipped. When he stepped from the Baltimore County Courts Building in Towson and waved to the television cameras, the defense attorneys who had proved his innocence were trying to figure out where Webster, who has no surviving family, no job, no money and no home, would sleep during his first night of freedom.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2003
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has pardoned Bernard Webster, the man released from prison in November after spending 20 years incarcerated for a rape that DNA evidence proved he did not commit. The pardon is a necessary first step for the 40-year-old Baltimore man to receive financial compensation from the state. According to Maryland law, Webster can now go before the Board of Public Works and ask to be reimbursed for the damage that he suffered by spending his adult life in a medium-security prison, the Maryland Correctional Institution at Hagerstown.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
A Texan on death row asked the Supreme Court to grant him a new hearing on the basis of new evidence his lawyers obtained 10 years after his trial. He says it shows he is innocent of the murder for which he was convicted and sentenced to death. The court turned him down.Given the high court's previous interpretations of the Constitution on the death penalty and timetables for appeals, this was no doubt the right decision to make: The new evidence cited in this case by the death row inmate was not compelling, and the inmate had long ago lost several post-conviction appeals.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 23, 2000
A Glen Burnie man who murdered his wife and the next day took his lover and 11-year-old son to see the violent film "Pulp Fiction" was sentenced Friday to life in prison. David A. Dicus, 41, gazed at his son Lucas, 15, as he was led in handcuffs from a packed Anne Arundel County circuit courtroom after Judge Ronald A. Silkworth pronounced the sentence. Dicus was convicted in November of strangling his wife, Terry L. Keefer, on July 28, 1995, and dumping her body near Scaggsville. At the trial, his lover testified that Dicus killed his wife because a lawyer had told him he would not win sole custody of their son in the divorce he was contemplating.
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