Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInnocence
IN THE NEWS

Innocence

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber Mike Littwin of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | December 16, 1990
It's called The Box, a sweltering, dimly lit gymnasium with a hard-court floor smudged dark brown, two half-moon-shaped backboards and four brick walls.This is where David Wingate began a basketball journey, reaching each step on a path that stretched from the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center in East Baltimore, to Dunbar High School, to Georgetown University, to the National Basketball Association.In September, Wingate was on the verge of securing his financial future, coming within 48 hours of signing a three-year,$2.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2014
After months of hesitation, President Barack Obama has authorized the use of U.S. military force, including limited airstrikes, against Islamic militants in Iraq who in recent months have overrun large parts of the country and now threaten the northern city of Erbil as well as tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians trapped atop a barren mountain where they sought refuge after fleeing their homes. Up to now Mr. Obama has gone out of his way to avoid American involvement in the multiple conflicts roiling the region, including the bitter civil war in Syria that has claimed more than 140,000 lives and given rise to a radical extremist group, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, that now controls large swaths of territory on both sides of the Syrian-Iraqi border.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 12, 2014
Your editorial on a recent report by the National Registry of Exonerations was interesting and informative ( "Guilty until proven innocent," Feb. 5). I write, however, to correct one error. You describe the record number of exonerations reported by the registry in 2013 and add that "the term [exoneration] is used loosely. Overturned convictions may have little to do with the establishment of actual innocence and more to do with the discovery of mistakes or misdeeds in the legal proceedings.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 13, 2014
Perhaps you missed ... a regional National Labor Relations Board decision that ruled Northwestern University's football players are "employees" subject to union representation. And before you dismiss this decision as the ravings of some bureaucrat laborite, remember that the appeal goes to the full Barack Obama-controlled board, now simply a satellite operation for the AFL-CIO. My readers can figure out the myriad problems with this concept on their own, but allow me one simple illustration of the awkwardness involved.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
A nation weeps. At 9:30 a.m., a man in his 20s walks into an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., where his mother taught and proceeds to shoot and kill the equivalent of a filled classroom of people, most of them young children. It is the most senseless, most heinous, most hellish act imaginable. In our offices, our homes or wherever there is a TV set turned to a news outlet, we watch this crime scene and hear the speculation, the shock and horror and finally the gruesome details.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
U.S. Attorney Rosenstein's comments ("Feds don't confiscate property from the innocent" Feb. 27) highlight the problem with civil forfeiture: it turns the presumption of innocence upside down. If police seize your property under civil forfeiture, you must prove yourself innocent to get it returned, often waiting years before your day in court. Contrary to a criminal case, which requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt, to take your property under civil forfeiture prosecutors need only prove that it is more likely than not that your property is linked to a crime.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
If the woman described in your asset forfeiture article did not know about the illegal drug business in her basement, prosecutors could not forfeit her house ("Seizing assets to take profits from crime," Feb. 17). The law is clear: "An innocent owner's interest in property shall not be forfeited under any civil forfeiture statute. " Federal courts supervise asset forfeiture cases. If someone makes an innocent owner claim, the court will evaluate the evidence to determine whether she knew about the criminal activity on her property and whether she tried to stop it. A property owner can tell her side of the story in a written affidavit or an oral deposition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011
What follows is a personal statement from David Simon, Creator and Executive Producer of "The Wire" (and currently in production on "Treme"). First of all, Felicia's entitled to the presumption of innocence. And I would note that a previous, but recent drug arrest that targeted her was later found to be unwarranted and the charges were dropped. Nonetheless, I'm certainly sad at the news today. This young lady has, from her earliest moments, had one of the hardest lives imaginable.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Death row inmate Troy Anthony Davis won a temporary reprieve from the Georgia parole board this month as a succession of witnesses who fingered him as a cop killer admitted that they had the wrong man. Their recantations weren't new; they'd been telling courts and others that they were mistaken in their identification of Mr. Davis for some time now and yet it didn't seem to make a difference until Mr. Davis was within 24 hours of execution. How is that possible in American jurisprudence?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Last year when CNN was talking about hiring Eliot Spitzer and Piers Morgan, I expressed my dismay at the way in which both could harm the credibility that the channel had steadfastly built through its journalism. Spitzer did prove to be an embarrassment when CNN tried to cover political sex scandals tbis year, and he is now gone for a variety of reasons, thank goodness. And now, just as I was becoming reconciled to accepting Morgan as the price I had to pay for all the sound journalism and analysis otherwise on CNN, comes Rupert Murdoch's News of the World scandal with its revelations of despicable phone hacking -- a scandal that threatens to shine a very bright light on Morgan's career as a UK tabloid editor.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
Your editorial on a recent report by the National Registry of Exonerations was interesting and informative ( "Guilty until proven innocent," Feb. 5). I write, however, to correct one error. You describe the record number of exonerations reported by the registry in 2013 and add that "the term [exoneration] is used loosely. Overturned convictions may have little to do with the establishment of actual innocence and more to do with the discovery of mistakes or misdeeds in the legal proceedings.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
A report released this week from the National Registry of Exonerations, a joint venture between two Midwestern law schools, hails 2013 as a "record-breaking" year for exonerations - though the term is used loosely. Overturned convictions may have little to do with the establishment of actual innocence and more to do with the discovery of mistakes or misdeeds in the legal proceedings. Around the country, at least 87 convictions were overturned last year, including two in Maryland - one because information about the unreliability of a key witness was withheld from the defense and the other because DNA analysis revealed another man committed the crime.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
In the days after a gunman killed two people and himself at The Mall in Columbia, the Nail Trix salon heard from many nervous customers canceling appointments. Manicurist Van Le took several of those calls, struck 15 appointments off his calendar and listened as people explained their reluctance to return, at least for the moment. "They said they do not feel comfortable," said Le, who has worked there for eight years. "They don't say when they'll come back, but they say they'll come.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
Thanks for your coverage of the ACLU's report on immigration detainers in Maryland ( "ACLU criticizes Md. police on immigration enforcement," Nov. 19). Unfortunately, the claim made by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that immigration detainers are issued only against people ICE has a legal basis to take into custody is false. Nationally, between 2008 and 2012 at least 834 immigration detainer requests were lodged against U.S. citizens - people who are never properly the subjects of an immigration detainer.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | November 22, 2013
The walk home from school is what I remember most. It should have been a lighthearted schoolboy stroll for a sixth grader on a cloudy and mild Friday in late November, filled with visions of the weekend ahead and the long Thanksgiving holiday just a few days away. Instead, it was a mournful plodding along a route I had walked daily, yet, on that afternoon, my surroundings seemed somehow alien. The remnants of crisp fallen leaves crackling under foot served as constant reminders that, with each step, my childhood was palpably draining out of me and being left behind to evaporate into memory.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
In response to a growing body of scientific evidence suggesting that witnesses to crimes often misidentify suspects shown to them in police photo lineups, the Baltimore City Police Department announced recently that is changing the way it conducts the procedure to make it less prone to error. That's a long overdue change that not only brings the department more in line with modern best practices but also makes it less likely that innocent people will be sent to prison for crimes they didn't commit based on faulty witness identifications.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
Convicted murderer Roger K. Coleman went to his execution in 1992 protesting his innocence in a Virginia case that became a cause for death penalty opponents. But DNA technology unavailable at the time has proved otherwise: Mr. Coleman's guilt in the murder-rape of his sister-in-law was confirmed last week by a DNA test, the first ever held post-execution. Virginia Gov. Mark Warner was right to order the test: The technology offers a certainty as to guilt or innocence in crimes of murder and rape that other kinds of evidence can't match.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A man accused of being part of a group that beat a man to death in West Baltimore "acted as any other father would" and maintains his innocence, his lawyer said Monday,. "What he did not do is murder the man," attorney Thomas J. Maronick, Jr., said. His client, Willie Mayes, 59, is accused of first-degree murder in the Sept. 2 death of Donald Robinson, 52, in Reservoir Hill. Baltimore police said Mayes, his 19-year-old daughter, Latiqwa Mayes, and two teenage strangers ganged up on Robinson after Latiqwa screamed out that Robinson had raped her. Latiqwa Mayes was also charged with murder as was Kwan Blackburn and Malik Antonio Hampton-Cummings, both 17. "What my client was doing what any father would do, trying to protect his daughter," Maronick said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.