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NEWS
By Heather R. Mizeur and Thomas E. Wilcox | October 25, 2011
No heat in the winter. No air conditioning in the summer. Windows painted shut since the 1950s trap stagnant air that triggers infections and asthma attacks. Broken water fountains sit rusted outside crammed, crumbling classrooms. The U.S. Constitution protects prisoners from ever facing such conditions. Yet a letter to the Baltimore Sun on Oct. 16 revealed that Baltimore's schoolchildren suffer these indignities every day. The writers were neither parents nor teachers but a group of middle school students themselves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Dante Liberatore works a room in a way that few restaurateurs care to, or dare to, these days. We saw him compel a sour patron to concede that her wait for a table had been exactly as long as he said it would be. She wasn't thrilled, but her husband was. Later we heard him tell a diner at a nearby table that if she still didn't like a pasta dish the kitchen remade for her, he would eat it himself. She didn't like it, and he ate it. That's part of the fun at Liberatore's of Eldersburg.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
At a time when increasing numbers of Baltimore City high school graduates are choosing to attend community colleges instead of traditional four-year institutions, Gov. Martin O'Malley was right to try to shake up the leadership of the faltering Baltimore City Community College. BCCC desperately needs an infusion of new ideas and leadership if it is to fulfill its mission of preparing students for the academic rigors of a traditional college or university, or of giving them the skills they need to succeed in the work world.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
Remedi SeniorCare, a Baltimore-based company that distributes pharmaceuticals to assisted-living homes and other health care institutions, said Wednesday it received a $300 million investment from a New York-based group. Remedi will use the money to expand its website services and automated robotic technology for dispensing medications, and to fund future acquisitions in the industry, the company said. The company received an immediate infusion of $60 million from the New York investment firm, Centerbridge Partners LP. Gus.sentementes@baltsun.com Twitter.com/gussent Text BUSINESS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun Business text alerts
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Viewers see first the beast's ravenous mouth, with six fangs increasing in size and as pointed as daggers. The fiend is wearing a "Vote" button with an image of the American flag, and its tail snakes into a dollar sign. Even before gallery-goers scan the caption — "Monstrous costs: Total House and Senate campaign expenditures" — they have a good idea which dismal fact of modern life is being illustrated. Moreover, they know exactly how artist Nigel Holmes feels about the increase.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
Investors reacted positively Wednesday to First Mariner Bancorp's efforts to save itself with the help of a New York firm, pushing the Baltimore company's stock price up more than 7 percent. Shares closed at 74 cents, up from 69 cents on Tuesday. The stock — which peaked at $20 a share in 2006 before tanking amid the housing bust and recession — traded as high as nearly 12 percent above the Tuesday closing price for part of Wednesday morning. The 1st Mariner Bank parent announced after markets closed Tuesday that Priam Capital, a New York private investment partnership headed by Baltimore native Howard Feinglass, would take a nearly 25 percent ownership stake in exchange for $36.4 million in much-needed cash . The deal is contingent on the bank raising an additional $123.6 million from other investors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Monday was a night of many firsts at Angels Rock Bar. It was the first time the bar, and possibly the United States Bartenders' Guild, presented a cocktail-and-tattoo bartending competition. It was the first time some of the competitors submitted original recipes for a mixing contest. And it was the first time I had judged one. Bartending competitions usually serve two purposes: to plug the brand that sponsors it and the bar that employs the winning bartender. But my goal was an altogether different one: to get to know some of the local bartenders I hadn't yet met. Altogether, 12 Maryland bartenders submitted recipes — and tattoos — for consideration in Monday's contest, and they were narrowed to six, said Sean Wachsman, a spokesman for Tuaca liqueur, which sponsored the contest.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Baltimore City and Howard County said Tuesday that they will fine merchants who refuse to stop selling caffeine-infused alcohol drinks — a move designed to add teeth to state and federal warnings about the popular beverages. The city's ban on Four Loko and similar drinks, which goes into effect after 5 p.m. Thursday, calls for fines of up to $1,000. The county's ban, which goes into effect a day earlier, has staggered fines of up to $500. Peter Beilenson, Howard County's health officer, said county officials believed the ban was necessary because the safety warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and state health officials sent mixed messages.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler asked the state's health department Friday to remove all caffeine-infused alcoholic drinks from the state's liquor stores and taverns. "I ask you to exercise your authority … to take all steps available to you to prevent any further distribution or sale of these unsafe, unadulterated, and mislabeled products wherever found in Maryland," Gansler wrote in a letter to John M. Colmers, the state's secretary of health and mental hygiene.
SPORTS
By The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
While the Ravens failed to add a cornerback in the NFL draft, the team did address a timely need on defense. The Ravens infused youth into their front seven. The second-round additions of outside linebacker Sergio Kindle and nose tackle Terrence Cody should help the Ravens' aging groups on the defensive line and at linebacker. Over the previous three drafts, the Ravens had 11 picks in the first three rounds and used just two of them on the front seven. Those selections (defensive end Paul Kruger and inside linebacker Tavares Gooden)
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