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Inflation

BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 1, 2011
A flood in India, Chinese garlic speculators, a growing global economy, ethanol subsidies in Iowa and a dozen other factors are making your Lawry's Seasoned Salt more expensive. And that's not all. Rising prices for food and other commodities have people talking about a resurgence of consumer-price inflation, which has been all but dead for years. On Monday, West Texas crude hit $92 a barrel, its highest price since 2008. The price of milk rose 5 percent last year, according to the Labor Department.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Low inflation is a welcome economic sign for spenders, but for savers, it can be too much of a good thing. The effect of super low inflation could be seen in recent days when the government announced changes to savings bond rates and retirement account limits that are pegged to inflation. Savers can now expect meager returns on the inflation-protected Series I Savings Bonds, if they even still want to buy them. And employees won't be able to sock away more next year in a 401(k)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
A rear seat belt that inflates like an airbag upon impact. A radar-based technology that warns of an impending collision. A car that does the parallel parking for you. All these cutting-edge safety-related technologies developed by Ford Motor Co. were on display Wednesday for high school students in a Johns Hopkins University summer engineering program. The Dearborn, Mich.-based auto manufacturer called the event an opportunity for prospective engineers of the future to explore some of the car safety technologies that are about to emerge for the ultimate test drive in the marketplace.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 13, 2010
"Inflation? What inflation?" wrote Zacks analyst Dirk van Dijk on the financial company's blog earlier this year. "Strippers declare inflation dead" was the Bloomberg headline from a few weeks ago. (Strippers are a kind of Treasury bond. Don't get excited.) The St. Louis Federal Reserve asks Web readers to choose "the top risk for reigniting inflation." The most popular answer: "There is no inflation risk — it's dead and buried." So why are T. Rowe Price and other mutual fund companies increasingly trying to protect long-term investors against the risk that consumer-price increases will revive?
NEWS
February 3, 2010
The next crop of Howard County elected officials would get annual inflation-tied pay raises but no flat salary boosts, according to a series of votes Monday night by the County Council. The final votes were 3-2 on the council pay bill, with Chairwoman Courtney Watson, an Ellicott City Democrat, and Greg Fox, a Fulton Republican, dissenting. Only Fox opposed the executive's pay bill. The votes mean the executive elected in November would maintain the rate of $160,198, and the new council members' pay would remain at $54,300, though all the current officials voluntarily donated recent pay raises, plus five days of additional pay, to charity because of the recession and in solidarity with county employee furloughs.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
I am very glad that Mike Preston is not the teacher in my children's classes! ("Mike Preston's report card," Nov. 30.) I'm not sure what scale he is grading on, but it seems that virtually everyone does badly on it. Even after an exciting win against a very good Pittsburgh Steelers team, no one gets an A. That kind of grading scheme is demoralizing, as any good teacher knows. I propose Mr. Preston go get an education degree and not come back to The Sun until after he's graduated.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
The Social Security Administration announced Thursday that beneficiaries won't be getting an increase in their checks next year - the first time that has happened since automatic adjustments began in 1975. A lack of inflation triggered the decision, which will affect more than 57 million people nationwide, the agency said. But Lois King, 84, doesn't buy it. "Everywhere you go, everything is higher than it was six months ago. Sometimes from one week to the next," said the Towson resident, who receives two-thirds of her income from Social Security.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | October 11, 2009
Investors and economists worry about higher inflation, but the more immediate concern is inflation that's flat or even negative. Retirement contributions, Social Security and pension checks, as well as certain tax breaks, are tied to inflation. And when inflation is flat or negative - which it is for the first time since the 1950s - that could mean no increases in Social Security checks and even smaller pension checks for millions of retirees. And it could restrict the amount you can sock away in your 401(k)
NEWS
By Stuart Rojstaczer | March 25, 2009
SAN FRANCISCO -About six years ago, I was sitting in the student union of a small liberal arts college when I saw a graph on the cover of the student newspaper that showed the history of grades given at that institution in the past 30 years. Grades were up. Way up. I'm a scientist by training, and I love numbers. So when I looked at that graph, I wondered: How many colleges and universities have data like this that I can find? The answer is that a lot of schools have data like this hidden somewhere.
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