Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInflation
IN THE NEWS

Inflation

NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Up to 300 Baltimore homeowners are seeing a jump in property tax bills because the city says they have received excessive credits for historic renovations, according to a city councilman briefed on the issue. The city has promised not to seek back taxes from homeowners who benefited from miscalculations made by the state. But city officials have made upward adjustments on tax bills starting with the fiscal year that began July 1 - prompting complaints of unfairness from homeowners in the 10-year program.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 3, 2013
This is typically the busiest month for moving in the year. If you're one of those people who will be on the move soon, make sure you check out the company that will be transporting your belongings. According to Consumer Reports, regulators in Massachusetts and New Jersey sued movers for giving customers low estimates and then hiking the price once goods were on the truck. One mover, according to the magazine, threatened to sell the belongings unless customers paid up. Federal law restricts how much movers can revise initial estimates, but that's only in cases where people are moving across state lines.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
In his South Carolina speech, Gov. Martin O'Malley said we have "cut state spending big time" ("O'Malley takes a tryout in S.C.," March 24). Since July 2007, Maryland's population has increased less than 1 percent a year and inflation has averaged slightly over 2 percent annually. Yet the governor's first budget in fiscal 2008 was less than $30 billion, while his most recent submission, for fiscal 2014, is over $37 billion - about a 4 percent annual increase over his tenure. Thus state government spending adjusted for inflation has actually increased on a per capita basis.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
The gas tax plan unveiled this week by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly's top leaders is a complicated proposal that wouldn't represent our first choice in how best to pay for Maryland's transportation needs. But, on balance, it's a better-than-expected solution to a problem that has been nagging the State House for two decades. Better than expected because efforts to increase the gas tax have been practically dead on arrival in Annapolis for years, thanks to high prices at the pump and public hostility toward anything that might raise them further - even as alternatives like vehicle registration and licensing fees hit Marylanders harder than a few pennies on the gallon would.
NEWS
By Robert Yentzer | January 28, 2013
When it comes to fixing America's ballooning debt problem, there is one policy option that both Democrats and Republicans should be rushing to embrace. It is the proposal to replace the current Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a more accurate measure of price inflation: the Chained-CPI. If this index were used to calculate cost of living increases in Social Security benefits, income tax brackets and the like, the government could realize significant savings. The current CPI's exaggerated estimates of inflation are a wasteful leak in the fiscal pipeline.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Congress and President Obama have set the inheritance tax trigger at $5 million and indexed it to inflation. They also indexed the alternate minimum tax to inflation. This legislation limits some of the penalty on those who have achieved wealth that they subsequently pass on to their heirs as well on those who are still in the in process of accumulating their wealth. Now that those inequities have been addressed. It's time to eliminate the inequity our government has fostered upon the majority of retired Social Security recipients.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | December 13, 2012
Bar the door, Nelly - the Fed has abandoned all restraint and will now print money to finance the federal deficit. To support the weak recovery, the Federal Reserve continues to keep short-term interest rates near zero, purchase mortgage-backed securities and push down long-term interest rates. To accomplish the latter, since September 2011, the Fed has sold Treasury bills with terms of less than three years to purchase bonds with longer maturities. Now, with its supply of short-term securities running out, the Fed will simply print new money to buy U.S. government debt - at a pace of $45 billion a month.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
A pair of reports critical of military spending — on items as diverse as health care and dried meat — are part of the latest round of scrutiny of the Defense Department's budget as the fiscal cliff approaches. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a report this month that military compensation over the past decade increased faster than the rate of inflation and, in some years, the growth rate of private-sector wages and salaries. Another report, by Sen. Tom Coburn, outlined what the Oklahoma Republican sees as wasteful or redundant military expenditures, including the military's creation of its own beef jerky.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 2, 2012
The new rates for U.S. Savings Bonds are out. And at least the Series I bonds offer a better rate than you get at the bank. Series I bonds purchased this month through the end of April will earn an annualized 1.76 percent for the first six months. Series I bonds are inflation protected. The bond has two rates: a fixed rate for the life of the 30-year-bond and an adjustable rate that goes up and down with inflation every six months. New I bonds carry a zero percent fixed rate, and a 1.76 percent annual rate tied to inflation.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 16, 2012
The Social Security Administration announced Tuesday that 56 million retirement beneficiaries are set to get a cost-of-living raise of 1.7 percent next year. The same goes for the 8 million people receiving disability payments from the agency. The raise is tied to inflation. Checks this year went up 3.6 percent, after two years when inflation was so low that beneficiaries didn't get a raise at all. In addition, the agency announced that the level of earnings subject to the Social Security tax is going up $3,600 to $113,700 next year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.