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By Michael Gisriel | January 26, 1997
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I'm interested in what information you can tell me about the possible reuse of "Brownfields" or contaminated industrial sites in Maryland.Sam HearnLuthervilleDear Mr. Hearn:Brownfields is a relatively recent term of art which applies to vacant or under-utilized industrial or commercial facilities with existing or perceived environmental contamination.In Baltimore, for example, which lost more than 50 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1970 and 1990, there is estimated to be in excess of 1,000 acres of vacant industrial land, with thousands more acres of existing uses with potentially difficult reuse potential.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration plans to propose bigger property tax breaks for industrial properties in Southeast Baltimore — including the site of a new Amazon warehouse — to bring more jobs to the area. A new "focus area," which must be approved by the state, would give property owners a 10-year 80 percent property tax credit on value added by physical improvements. It also boosts the credits granted for wages paid to new employees and offers breaks for investments in "personal property," such as machinery.
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NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 1997
WASHINGTON - Abandoned industrial sites in Baltimore and other parts of Maryland could become more attractive to investors if legislation pending in Congress is approved.The measure says an investor who decided to buy such a site would not be liable for environmental contaminants found there later, as long as he or she was careful to check for any environmental problems before buying the property.The bill, introduced by Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, a New Jersey Democrat, and 10 other senators, ""would make it very clear who is protected from liability," Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Carol M. Browner said."
NEWS
By Evans Paull | February 27, 2014
Cities around the world are working to revitalize brownfield sites - areas where redevelopment or reuse may be complicated by some kind of contaminant - particularly in former waterfront industrial zones, where there is often the greatest opportunity to remake the city's image. Just as Baltimore has succeeded in redeveloping industrial sites from Canton to the Inner Harbor to Locust Point, decades of experience across America have created a base of knowledge that is allowing many such projects to move ahead safely, attracting residents and business back to our urban core.
NEWS
February 7, 1997
IT SHOULD HAVE happened last year, but at the last minute environmentalists and business representatives failed to bridge their differences on a bill clearing the way for redevelopment of "brownfields" -- old industrial sites contaminated by past owners. But now, the two sides have found common ground, putting this year's bill on a fast track.The idea is to take these former plants and factories and make them environmentally and economically viable as job sites. There are 1,200 brownfields in Maryland -- 3,200 acres alone surrounding the Port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
A Baltimore real estate developer who successfully lured importers to a special trade zone near the port of Baltimore is planning to market industrial properties in Taneytown.Taneytown City Council is expected to endorse a proposal that consultant Stanley K. Ward calls "The Taneytown Initiative" at tonight's meeting.The council will meet at 7: 30 p.m. at the city office, 17 E. Baltimore St."We want to market a menu of industrial sites within the city of Taneytown that will allow Taneytown to re-establish its industrial base and will offer [manufacturers]
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1997
This spring, more than 100 townhouses are expected to sprout on a weedy, debris-strewn field in Southwest Baltimore where an old metal fabricating plant once stood.Barre Station, the housing project, has been a long time coming. Announced three years ago, the groundbreaking has been delayed as Baltimore spent nearly $1 million -- far more than expected -- to remove old concrete building slabs and to clean oil and toxic chemicals tainting the soil.Legislation introduced recently in Annapolis could make it easier to reuse such brownfields.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 1998
MEBANE, N.C. -- Economic developers in North Carolina have reassembled two 1,000-acre tracts in hopes of luring one of the big industrial prospects scouting the South.Site-selection specialists said they're working with companies on several projects which, if built, would range in investment from $300 million to $400 million and would create hundreds of jobs.Eager to land one of those projects, the North Carolina Commerce Department requested that Duke Power Co. seek to secure or renew options to buy property in Alamance County, between Raleigh and Greensboro.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1997
Hoping to draw new industry and jobs to Baltimore's vacant or underused industrial sites, the Empower Baltimore Management Corp. is offering $3 million in loans and grants to developers and land owners to clean up contaminated properties.Matching grants totaling $500,000 will cover costs of environmental testing, while a $2.5 million revolving loan pool will help finance cleanup of land in the city's federally designated empowerment zones, the corporation said yesterday.Working with other city agencies, the nonprofit Empower Baltimore is targeting the Fairfield industrial area in South Baltimore and the Carroll-Camden Industrial Park, adjacent to the stadiums, where about 230 acres likely have contaminated soil, the corporation said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
Declaring that Maryland is "open for business," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed bills yesterday to encourage redevelopment of historic buildings and contaminated former industrial sites and to expand opportunities for small and minority companies. The "brownfields" legislation, the extension of the historic preservation tax credit and an expansion of state contracts with small businesses were among the 170 bills signed by Ehrlich yesterday. It was the second signing ceremony since the General Assembly ended its 2004 session this month.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A sprawling paint factory in industrial South Baltimore might be the last place you'd expect to attract hummingbirds. But Sherwin-Williams might now start drawing nectar-loving birds and more with native wildflowers, American beautyberry and pine trees it's planting at its manufacturing complex on Hollins Ferry Road. The effort is aimed at creating a more pleasant workplace, enhancing the neighborhood and helping clean up the harbor. Sherwin-Williams is one of a handful of companies - some with checkered environmental records - that have signed on to spruce up their properties, part of a new initiative to enlist businesses, nonprofits and government agencies there in helping to boost the city's anemic tree canopy, attract more wildlife and restore its degraded urban waters.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Steel from Sparrows Point built the Golden Gate Bridge, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, hundreds of ships for World War II and livelihoods for tens of thousands of Baltimore-area families. The story of the massive steel mill follows the arc of American manufacturing — rapid ascent, years of dominance, a generation of shrinking employment and decline. In the last dozen years, the mill has had five owners, two bankruptcies and many furloughs. Last week came a stark warning that the final chapter in its 125-year history could be at hand.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
A former industrial parcel on Key Highway in South Baltimore will be the site of a seven-story residential and retail project called Riverside Lofts, if developer Mark Shapiro can get the design and financing approvals he needs to move ahead with construction. Shapiro is scheduled today to present preliminary plans for the project to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. They call for a building with a Walgreens store on the first level and 100 to 120 apartments above.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
Ventilation systems are being installed by the state in three homes in Baltimore's Westport neighborhood, according to state officials, after tests found toxic vapors seeping into the dwellings from long-abandoned industrial sites nearby that had been the focus of an emergency hazardous-waste cleanup decades ago. In addition, said James Carroll of the Maryland Department of the Environment, efforts are under way to treat potentially cancer-causing solvents...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | January 7, 2005
Researchers are a step closer to understanding a one-celled organism used to clean up industrial waste. An international team of scientists announced today the sequencing of the genome for Dehalococcoides ethenogenes, a type of bacteria that gobbles up toxic waste. Aimed at identifying what triggers the cleanup process, the project shows that the bacterium is a particularly efficient creature, feeding off hydrogen and chlorine for energy as it destroys toxics. "It's been evolving itself so that it can take up these compounds and degrade them," said Rekha Seshadri, lead author and a researcher at The Institute for Genomic Research in Rockville.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
Declaring that Maryland is "open for business," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed bills yesterday to encourage redevelopment of historic buildings and contaminated former industrial sites and to expand opportunities for small and minority companies. The "brownfields" legislation, the extension of the historic preservation tax credit and an expansion of state contracts with small businesses were among the 170 bills signed by Ehrlich yesterday. It was the second signing ceremony since the General Assembly ended its 2004 session this month.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1998
As a place for business, Carroll County attracts Hollywood filmmakers, retirement-community developers and world-recognized manufacturers.But the once-rural county remains a more popular place to live than to work, county economic development officials told Carroll political and business leaders yesterday.Carroll reportedly has the lowest wages in the Baltimore region, does not have enough industrial space and lacks jobs for spouses of new county residents."You can see why half the county leaves every day," said John T. Lyburn Jr., the county's economic development director, noting that 50 percent of the labor force works outside the county.
BUSINESS
By Michael English and Michael English,Special to SunSpot | January 26, 2004
There's no more land in Charm City. City fathers say it's all gone: Every significant tract zoned for industrial and commercial use within city limits is either home to an active business, or was once used and now stands abandoned, unwanted or unusable. That leaves developers keen on building in the city with few choices -- wait for a property vacancy in-town, look for real estate elsewhere, or opt for what's becoming a popular choice: building on a cleaned-up brownfield site. Brownfield revitalization now is an essential element in the city's efforts to market Baltimore to companies that want to relocate here, but can't find vacant property on which to build.
NEWS
By Ben Pillow and Ben Pillow,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 27, 2004
Touting a commitment "to level the playing field" for state businesses, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. today signed into law 170 pieces of legislation, including "brownfields" and minority business enterprise reform, as well as historic preservation tax credits. "Today, we take significant steps in the right direction to level the playing field for Maryland businesses and continue to strengthen Maryland's economic future through revitalization of unused facilities and older communities," Ehrlich said in a statement.
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