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NEWS
October 21, 1996
LIKE WATERGATE, this may turn out to be a campaign scandal with more legs than a spider. President Clinton and his entourage, including the Democratic National Committee, have received contributions of up to $5 million through persons associated with a multi-billion-dollar Indonesian banking conglomerate, the Lippo Group.Taken even in its best light, this may just be another result -- though one involving foreign interests -- of a campaign-financing system loaded with big bucks and soft money and ample avenues for corruption.
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NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE MEETING of the People's Consultative Assembly of Indonesia, starting today, is the last chance President Suharto has to commit his nation to reforms to end its economic crisis, meet International Monetary Fund requirements, diminish his family's stranglehold on the national wealth and promise the people a better future. There is scant hope that he will.When the assembly winds up March 11, "electing" the military dictator to a sixth term as president and presumably his anti-reform crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, as vice president, it may be too late.
NEWS
July 24, 1996
IT WAS 30 years ago that General Suharto seized power in Indonesia from the leftist independence leader, Sukarno, during a period of strife and a failed Communist power grab. He has ruled ever since, as president since 1968, and he wins elections in which the phony opposition supports him. This has produced an authoritarian state in which prosperity and capitalism are booming, yet another Asian miracle. Regional rebellions flare, FTC along cultural and racial fault lines, on just two of the archipelago's islands.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | June 15, 1999
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- After Indonesia's first democratic elections in 44 years, the ruling Golkar party of ousted President Suharto has conceded defeat, ending decades of one-party rule.But thanks to a complex and indirect voting system, the race for the presidency is just beginning and the final winners and losers in Indonesia's transition to democracy are not clear.A year after anti-Suharto riots killed 1,200 and forced the autocrat to step down, voters' expectations for democratic change are soaring.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 2007
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- In the latest of a series of transportation disasters in Indonesia, a passenger airliner slammed into the ground yesterday on landing at the city of Yogyakarta and burst into flames, killing at least 21 people and leaving many badly injured. Survivors said the plane shuddered before landing, hit the ground with a hard jolt and slid off the end of the runway into a rice field, filling with smoke and darkness before erupting in flames and explosions. The cause of the accident was unclear.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | October 11, 1998
SINGAPORE -- There has always been an element of fear -- some would say paranoia -- in Singapore's 30-year effort to become one of the world's most prosperous nations.Few expected the predominantly Chinese island state to survive after it was cut loose from Malaysia in 1965. With few resources and occasionally hostile neighbors, the fear of failure became a major motivator for Singapore's hard-working population.That fear also helps explain why the tiny country of 3.2 million people maintains a 300,000-strong military, including 250,000 reservists, and a paternalistic government that discourages political opposition and public criticism.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
THE AGED, deposed national leader may or may not remember enough to help his defense, if the charges against him actually get to court. But former President of Indohesia Suharto is facing trial for skimming $570 million from the state in 32 years of misrule. Whether, at age 79, after two strokes, he is actually going through the indignity, or will escape on health grounds, doesn't matter much. He is not getting back in power. The establishment will move against the assets of his children and cronies, to the extent that it can find them.
NEWS
November 9, 1997
UNLIKE CURRENCY crises in other countries, those in Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia do not concern grandiose government expenditure or budget deficits. These are private-sector implosions, rather like the Maryland savings and loan scandal of the 1980s. But underneath lie political realities and uncertainties.Suharto of Indonesia is a military strong man and president since 1968 who has given the world's fourth-most populous country the stability it needed for capitalism to grow. But he is 76, with no successor in sight or opposition tolerated.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
One month and 24 days after he suffered a stroke in Indonesia, Dennis Storm, 57, a decorated Marine veteran and Bel Air resident, returned to the United States on Thursday. Storm was working as a contractor for a Singapore-based company and living in Jakarta when he was admitted to the Siloam Gleneagles Lippo Cikarang hospital for a stroke on Sept. 2. While receiving care, he contracted a fungal infection, pneumonia and bed sores. His family had been working with the U.S. Embassy and other government, military and private organizations to bring him home since September.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Indonesia's new president, B. J. Habibie, consolidated his hold over the country's politics yesterday when one of his close advisers won a hotly contested vote to lead the country's dominant political party.It was the first electoral test for the man who was almost nobody's choice to succeed President Suharto six weeks ago, and who many people believed would hold office only fleetingly.Habibie's control over the party greatly improves his ability to set the political agenda and remain in office at least until the end of next year, when he has scheduled a parliamentary vote for a new president.
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