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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Aileen remains traumatized by the men who broke into her room July 2 and raped and mutilated her. They singled her out, she is convinced, because she is Chinese.Scores of Chinese women report similar experiences in Indonesia this year, victims of a vicious expression of ethnic hatred in a nation with a history of interracial blood feuds.Government ministers acknowledge that such gang rapes have taken place since mobs burned more than 5,000 Chinese stores and shopping malls in mid-May, led by agitators yelling, "Death to the Chinese."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2002
JAKARTA, Indonesia - One of the foundation stones of American life abroad - good schools for the children - was shattered yesterday when three schools for international students announced they would remain closed for most of the month because of a continuing terrorist threat. The closing of the schools sent an anxious frisson through the foreign community in Jakarta, a city that has seen plenty of violence but rarely against expatriates, much less their children. Many parents, unnerved by a specific terrorist threat to bomb international schools, said they were leaving Indonesia immediately to put their children in schools back home.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Abu Bakar Bashir, the accused leader of the Jemaah Islamiah terror network, went on trial on treason charges yesterday just as police arrested another terror suspect they identified as his replacement. Police announced the arrest of 18 Jemaah Islamiah members, including little-known terror suspect Abu Rusdan, who was allegedly picked by Bashir to run Jemaah Islamiah after the militant 64-year-old cleric was arrested in October. "He was given the authority after the arrest of Abu Bakar Bashir to lead Jemaah Islamiah," said Erwin Mappaseng, national police chief of detectives.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 19, 2009
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Indonesians yesterday that she wants to open a "robust partnership" with their fast-growing country, President Barack Obama's boyhood home. Arriving here on the second stop of her first trip as the top American diplomat, Clinton also announced that the Obama administration intends to sign a treaty moving the U.S. closer to a key regional group, the Association of South East Asian Nations. The Bush administration declined to sign the treaty, a move that critics took as a sign of its lack of interest in the region and preoccupation with the Middle East.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Trying to send a strong message that widespread violence and corruption will no longer be tolerated in Indonesia, President Abdurrahman Wahid said yesterday that he would not to pardon the convicted son of former dictator Suharto and ordered the arrest of the country's most notorious militia leader. But Wahid's actions could lead to further unrest. Violence and public disorder have erupted during past government efforts to bring the Suharto family and the militias to justice, underscoring the difficulty of this impoverished country's struggle to forge a democracy after decades of authoritarian rule.
NEWS
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | January 18, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- After 32 years of unchallenged rule, President Suharto, Asia's longest lasting leader, still is in power but is struggling to retain control in a nation where many regard him as the problem, not the solution.Although he is expected to be re-elected in March to a seventh five-year term, opponents are openly defying him and calling for his resignation. That is the first time that has happened since he seized power.Yesterday, stores had reopened but police remained on the streets of a town in eastern Java, two days after riots erupted over increased food prices brought on by the nation's economic crisis.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
WHY ON earth should anyone in Maryland pay attention to faraway Indonesia? Because that archipelago of 13,000 islands spread between Asia and Australia is the world's fourth most populous - and largest Muslim - country. For years now, this extraordinary, diverse nation - its various ethnic groups speak 300 languages - has experienced turmoil and political stress. This week, its democratically elected president was forced aside. Power was transferred to the vice president, Megawati Sukarnoputri.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 16, 1998
SAMARINDA, Indonesia -- Borneo is burning again.Just months after blazes in Indonesia sent a devastating cloud of smoke across much of Southeast Asia, flames have blanketed )) much of the island's drought-stricken east coast with a haze so thick that planes can land only a few hours a day and visibility so poor that boat captains cannot navigate the rivers.The effect is surreal here along the equator. Children kick soccer balls through piles of fallen leaves as though it were autumn -- a season that doesn't exist on Borneo.
NEWS
By Bob Kemper and Bob Kemper,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 22, 2003
SINGAPORE - President Bush arrived today in Bali, Indonesia, the site of a devastating attack one year ago, to reassure leaders of the world's largest Muslim nation that his global war on terrorism is not a war on Islam. Amid extraordinary security, Bush will spend just 3 1/2 hours in Bali, where a bombing of a nightclub killed 202 people. He is expected to praise Prime Minister Megawati Sukarnoputri's crackdown on terrorists while emphasizing the need for Indonesia to remain on a moderate, democratic path despite internal threats from Islamic militants.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE MEETING of the People's Consultative Assembly of Indonesia, starting today, is the last chance President Suharto has to commit his nation to reforms to end its economic crisis, meet International Monetary Fund requirements, diminish his family's stranglehold on the national wealth and promise the people a better future. There is scant hope that he will.When the assembly winds up March 11, "electing" the military dictator to a sixth term as president and presumably his anti-reform crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, as vice president, it may be too late.
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