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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Two Towson University students edged out 170 other teams to win a national debate championship held in Indiana this week, the second time in recent years a Towson team has netted national debate honors. Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson, both from Baltimore, bested a team from the University of Oklahoma in the final round. Their argument likened police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues to a warlike violence against African-Americans in the U.S. and identified solutions.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Two Towson University students edged out 170 other teams to win a national debate championship held in Indiana this week, the second time in recent years a Towson team has netted national debate honors. Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson, both from Baltimore, bested a team from the University of Oklahoma in the final round. Their argument likened police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues to a warlike violence against African-Americans in the U.S. and identified solutions.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
An Indiana university said Monday that it gave Maryland a "D" for its manufacturing-industry health, adding that tax levels are likely a turnoff for companies in the sector. Ball State University's Center for Business and Economic Research gave the state "D" grades for tax climate - particularly its individual income tax, unemployment insurance and property taxes - as well as for the state's global reach through exports and the health of its logistics industry. The best grade the university gave Maryland was a "B" for productivity and innovation, a measure that includes research-and-development activity and patents per capita.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The University of Baltimore will offer free tuition to college students in their final semester if they can finish their degrees in four years, the school announced Tuesday. The unusual break could boost the college's flagging graduation rates and reduce student debt loads. Dubbed "Finish4Free," the deal is to be offered to this fall's freshmen when they reach their senior year, school officials said. They were unsure how much it would cost the university. In-state students now pay about $3,300 in tuition each semester; out-of-state students pay $9,000.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
Robert Irsay, the blustery, Chicago construction magnate who became Baltimore's most reviled sports figure when he moved his National Football League Colts to Indianapolis, died yesterday. He was 73.Mr. Irsay died at 10: 15 a.m. at Indiana University Hospital in Indianapolis of apparent heart and kidney failure, said Pamela Perry, director of public affairs at the Indiana University School of Medicine.Mr. Irsay had been in and out of hospitals since suffering a stroke on Nov. 29, 1995, which left him partially paralyzed, forced to use a wheelchair and unable to speak above a whisper.
NEWS
May 21, 2000
THERE WERE no rules for Bobby Knight. The Hall of Fame basketball coach could get away with anything at Indiana University and remain untouchable. He could toss chairs, punch a sports information director or overreact to stupid questions from sportswriters with barrages of profanity. He could do all of this with impunity. These transgressions were minor matters to Indiana University officials. What mattered most to them were National Collegiate Athletic Association trophies and dollars.
SPORTS
By INDIANAPOLIS STAR | November 20, 2000
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Indiana coach Cam Cameron denied rumors Saturday that he would leave to become an assistant coach with the Detroit Lions. "Both of my feet are planted at Indiana University," Cameron said. "We've got a job to get done, and we're not as close as we need to be to getting it done. "I don't know where that stuff comes from." Cameron coached at Michigan with new Lions coach Gary Moeller. In Cameron's four years at Indiana, the Hoosiers have yet to finish with a winning record and have a combined mark of 13-31.
NEWS
July 3, 1996
Steve Tesich, 53, the playwright and Academy Award-winning screenwriter of "Breaking Away," died Monday of a heart attack in Nova Scotia, where he was vacationing with his family.He won the Oscar in 1979 for "Breaking Away," a story about a group of teen-age "townies" in Bloomington, Ind., and their rivalry with the more privileged college students at nearby Indiana University.A native of Yugoslavia, Mr. Tesich came to this country when he was 14 and attended Indiana University on a wrestling scholarship.
SPORTS
By Bill Free B | November 23, 1991
Introducing Rod "The Rocket" Castro, the Baltimore Blast forward with an ever-present smile and a soccer portfolio that is hard to match.Castro has played soccer in Santiago, Chile; London; Los Angeles; Bloomington, Ind.; Memphis, Tenn.; San Diego and now Baltimore.He helped Indiana University win the NCAA soccer championship in 1983, played a major role in helping the Memphis Storm capture the American Indoor Soccer Association title (now NPSL) in 1988 and won two Major Soccer League championship rings with the San Diego Sockers the past two seasons.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg | July 3, 2005
Sandra A. O'Connor Occupation: State's attorney for Baltimore County In the news: O'Connor said she would step down when her term ends next year, ending a tenure of more than three decades as Baltimore County's top prosecutor. As state's attorney, she received support and criticism for her policy of seeking the death penalty in all eligible murder cases, except for those that fit narrowly defined criteria. She has not faced an Election Day challenge since the early 1980s, and her decision not to seek a ninth term sets up the possibility of a contested election next year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
In the two weeks between recent revelations that hackers stole data on students, alumni and faculty from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University, nearly 360,000 records were swiped in similar attacks at schools in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota. Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | January 2, 2014
Over 200 years ago, political theorist and philosopher Edmund Burke memorably remarked: "The only thing necessary for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing. " This truism comes to mind when assessing the reaction of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the recent vote by the American Studies Association (ASA) in favor of an academic boycott of Israel. The ASA, of which UMBC is an institutional member, is the nation's oldest and largest association dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of American history and culture.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
An Indiana university said Monday that it gave Maryland a "D" for its manufacturing-industry health, adding that tax levels are likely a turnoff for companies in the sector. Ball State University's Center for Business and Economic Research gave the state "D" grades for tax climate - particularly its individual income tax, unemployment insurance and property taxes - as well as for the state's global reach through exports and the health of its logistics industry. The best grade the university gave Maryland was a "B" for productivity and innovation, a measure that includes research-and-development activity and patents per capita.
NEWS
August 19, 2006
Lynton Keith Caldwell, 92, who helped shape the nation's policy requiring environmental impact studies for major projects, died Tuesday at his home in Bloomington, Ind. Dr. Caldwell, a professor emeritus at Indiana University, helped write the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. His draft resolution, much of which was incorporated into the act, required environmental impact studies for all major federal projects that would significantly affect the environment. He helped create Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg | July 3, 2005
Sandra A. O'Connor Occupation: State's attorney for Baltimore County In the news: O'Connor said she would step down when her term ends next year, ending a tenure of more than three decades as Baltimore County's top prosecutor. As state's attorney, she received support and criticism for her policy of seeking the death penalty in all eligible murder cases, except for those that fit narrowly defined criteria. She has not faced an Election Day challenge since the early 1980s, and her decision not to seek a ninth term sets up the possibility of a contested election next year.
NEWS
December 5, 2003
Robert Lee Lanphear, a retired FBI agent who led the agency's Annapolis office for a decade, died of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 28 at his Sherwood Forest home. He was 80. Mr. Lanphear was born and raised in South Bend, Ind. His studies at Indiana University were interrupted by World War II, when he was drafted into the Army Air Forces in 1943. Trained as a pilot, he flew B-17s in the Pacific and attained the rank of lieutenant. Returning to Indiana University, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1947.
NEWS
June 11, 1991
Bertice Reading, 54, an American jazz singer and actress who became a star on London stage and cabaret, died Saturday in London after suffering a stroke. She collapsed during rehearsals for "Notre Dame," a new musical based on "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" that is due to open later this month in Oxford, England. Born in Chester, Pa., she began her career dancing at age 3 with Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. She later won a hometown talent contest to appear for a week with Lionel Hampton's band.
NEWS
December 5, 2003
Robert Lee Lanphear, a retired FBI agent who led the agency's Annapolis office for a decade, died of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 28 at his Sherwood Forest home. He was 80. Mr. Lanphear was born and raised in South Bend, Ind. His studies at Indiana University were interrupted by World War II, when he was drafted into the Army Air Forces in 1943. Trained as a pilot, he flew B-17s in the Pacific and attained the rank of lieutenant. Returning to Indiana University, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1947.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2002
Richard Strauss, a front-rank composer who also was a dominant presence on the podium, once joked that a prime directive for conductors is to avoid looking at the trombone section for fear of encouraging them to play louder. The great Felix Mendelssohn agreed, tongue in cheek, saying that "trombones are too sacred for frequent use." But where would the symphonic repertoire be without them? From the noble chorale in the final movement of Johannes Brahms' 1st Symphony, to the slinky solo in Ravel's Bolero, to the crackling final bars of Rossini's Overture to the opera William Tell, the trombone is an expressive voice no music lover could do without.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2001
Many musical organizations understandably are focusing on the approaching holidays, but that doesn't mean you have to confine yourself to Handel and assorted carols - not that there's anything wrong with that. Among noteworthy examples of non-seasonal fare this week is a chamber concert featuring Janos Starker, one of the world's leading cellists for more than 40 years. He will be joined by William Preucil, concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra and former first violinist of the Cleveland Quartet; and pianist Shigeo Neriki, a frequent collaborator with orchestras and chamber ensembles around the globe.
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