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NEWS
By James Campbell | December 3, 2013
When David Andrews was asked to testify in Annapolis earlier this year, the dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education told assembled legislators that providing quality early learning opportunities to low-income children is critically important and playing catch up is a losing game. For poor children, catching up is indeed a losing proposition. Stubbornly high poverty rates and increasing income inequality have turned upside-down the long-held belief of education being a pathway to the middle class.
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NEWS
November 22, 2013
There is clearly an immediate need for housing among homeless families in Baltimore County. However, while the construction of low-income housing developments may temporarily alleviate the problem, over the long run it will only produce larger areas of concentrated poverty that ensure the majority of these families remain trapped in poverty for generations to come ( "Just saying no isn't good enough," Nov. 20). One has only to look at what happened in Baltimore City over the last 50 years, when large tracts of high-rise buildings designed exclusively for low-income housing were developed.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Baltimore County Council members rejected state funding Monday for a planned low-income housing development in Rosedale, passing a resolution expressing disapproval of the project. In a 6-0 vote, with Councilman Kenneth Oliver abstaining, council members turned down more than $1 million in funding from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development for a project planned by the nonprofit Homes for America. "Baltimore County is becoming poorer and poorer, and a lot of people can't afford high-end housing," said Oliver, a Randallstown Democrat, after the council meeting.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
With a prospective developer abandoning plans to revitalize a key vacant building on the City Dock waterfront, owners of the Annapolis property said they're uncertain about the future. "We don't have a clue where we are," said Greg Kaufman, co-owner of the Fawcett Boat Supplies building with Terry Terhorst through their company, Chandler LLC. Businessman Mark Ordan, who had hoped to demolish the vacant Fawcett building, said he terminated the deal to buy the property about three weeks ago, citing persistent opposition from city leaders and residents.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
City Councilwoman Helen Holton's proposed alternative to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to put many future municipal employees into a 401(k)-style plan instead of a traditional pension sounds, on the surface, like the compassionate thing to do. Ms. Holton wants to keep city civilian employees who make less than $40,000 a year in a traditional pension and to place those who make more in a hybrid plan, the idea being that those who earn less can least bear the risks associated with the kind of defined contribution plan the mayor proposes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown marked Veterans Day on Monday by releasing a five-part plan for former members of the armed forces, including a tax break and help with employment and housing. Brown, the lieutenant governor and a colonel in the Army Reserve, issued what he called his "Compact with Maryland Veterans" Monday with little fanfare on a day when he avoided scheduling campaign appearances and instead attended ceremonial functions in his official capacity.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
My wife and I are delighted at the opportunity to retire in Maryland for a host of reasons ( "Why pay for the privilege of retiring in Maryland?" Nov. 4). First, I doubt the accuracy of those who claim to be retiring in Pennsylvania for tax savings since Maryland does not tax Social Security or in many cases pension income. More importantly, Maryland offers many advantages including great schools, world class medical and higher education institutions and a progressive administration that has adopted strong gun controls, eliminated capital punishment, granted full rights to the gay, lesbian and transgender community, embraced Affordable Care Act provisions and adopted strong environmental and green-friendly measures.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur is proposing an income tax cut for about 99 percent of Maryland taxpayers -- to be offset by a higher levy on those making $500,000 or more. At a news conference in Annapolis Wednesday, Mizeur rolled out an economic plan that also calls for a minimum "living wage" that would reach $16.70 by 2022 and increased spending on jobs training for state workers. Mizeur, a two-term delegate from Montgomery County, proposed stepping up collections of taxes from large multi-state companies while providing tax relief for small businesses.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to use $10,000 in private foundation grants to fund a program designed to help low-income families stretch their food stamp benefits undoubtedly will help many of those struggling to make ends meet in the wake of this month's cuts to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. Under the mayor's proposal, food stamp recipients will be able to get up to $10 extra a week if they use their EBT (electronic benefits transfer)
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