Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInclusion
IN THE NEWS

Inclusion

NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | July 16, 2006
The self-proclaimed oldest regatta on the Chesapeake Bay will, for the first time this year, include a new competitive class for Maryland Special Olympic athletes. Any Governor's Cup Yacht Race skipper who brings on board one intellectually disabled athlete (along with his or her nondisabled partner) will qualify to compete in the new class, or division, during the overnight race from Annapolis to St. Mary's College. The regatta begins Aug. 4. "We're always looking for opportunities to develop the Governor's Cup and make it something that is an interesting event beyond just the race itself," said Torre Meringolo, vice president for development at the college.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 7, 2006
Despite new rules aimed at making the Emmy Awards more inclusive and less predictable, this year's nominations, for the most part, represent business as usual in Hollywood. Though the nominations, which were announced yesterday, include a few surprises, they are unlikely to improve the credibility or enhance the prestige of the awards. Unexpected contenders for the 58th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, scheduled to be broadcast Aug. 27, include Christopher Meloni of NBC's Law & Order: Special Victims Unit for best lead actor in a drama series - though James Gandolfini of HBO's The Sopranos and Hugh Laurie of Fox's House did not make the cut. Kevin James of CBS' The King of Queens was nominated as best lead actor in a comedy series, while Jason Bateman of Fox's Arrested Development was overlooked.
FEATURES
June 24, 2006
Send us your dance notices. Your concert listings. Your schedules of art exhibits. We're planning The Sun's annual Arts Guide, which will run this fall, and we'd like to know what arts events you've got coming up between September and May. If you'd like your arts events -- whether pop or classical music (and everything in between), visual arts, dance, film or theater -- to be considered for inclusion, please send us your listings by July 18. Be sure to include the event title, date, time, venue, address and contact number.
NEWS
By CHARLES MATTHEWS and CHARLES MATTHEWS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2006
A Strong West Wind: a Memoir Gail Caldwell Random House / 228 pages / $24.95 This may not be the best time to publish a memoir, what with all the fuss over the, um, exaggerations uncovered in James Frey's A Million Little Pieces. But Gail Caldwell's affecting A Strong West Wind is not that kind of memoir. It's more of a meditation on the past, a story of growing up and breaking free - and then of going back to reflect on what was gained and what was lost. Memoirs have been hot ever since Angela's Ashes made retired schoolteacher Frank McCourt a wealthy man with his frequently harrowing tales of growing up poor in Brooklyn and Ireland.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
Before entering Hammond High School in August, Jamani Nelson was a "C" student who hated math. Now math is the 14-year-old freshman's favorite subject, and he looks forward to the challenge of high school assessment tests. He attributes the transformation to an initiative called co-teaching, which has drawn attention from educators around the state and nationally. "At first, it was a rocky start," Nelson said. "Now I'm getting B's and A's." The class pairs a general-education and a special-education teacher to instruct a mixture of general- and special-education students.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer began her second term by pledging "the most inclusive, participatory and insightful planning process ever" in the development of a new 10-year master plan for the city. Following a bruising re-election campaign in which her opponents criticized her style as heavy-handed, Moyer used her swearing-in Monday to reach out to the city council, which has five new members. "Let's build bridges in the face of differences, not with complaints and criticism but through discovering our common ground and collective wisdom," said Moyer, 69. She said her top priority would be leading a "communitywide great conversation" on "Annapolis Vision 2018," a comprehensive plan that will take effect in 2008 and serve as a guide for the city government.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2005
Along with the distinctly Italian-themed Christopher Columbus impersonator, full-sized gondola and pizza-dough tosser, Baltimore's annual Columbus Day parade yesterday afternoon made room for the Na Fianna Irish Pipe Band, the Egyptian Sun belly dancers and the Catonsville Amateur Samba Drum line. "It's inclusive," said Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, mayor of Baltimore from 1967 to 1971 and the parade's grand marshal. "Rather than all about the man Columbus, we're drifting closer to celebrating the deed, the discovery of America."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 17, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - There are many valid reasons why President Bush should not meet again with Cindy Sheehan, the mother of Casey Sheehan, who was killed in Iraq. There is one reason he should, and that reason trumps the others. Yes, such a meeting would set a bad precedent because it would say that all one has to do to get time with the president is to stage a protest in August during the slow news cycle and one can enjoy a privilege available to few Americans. Yes, Cindy Sheehan has become a tool - and a willing one - of the far left which is unrelenting in its criticism of the president and his policies.
NEWS
By William G. Bowen, Martin A. Kurzweil and Eugene M. Tobin | July 17, 2005
EXPRESSIONS OF concern about America's ability to maintain its comparative advantage in fields such as information technology have made news, and the role of educational quality in this slippage has been noted. But one key connection has been left out of this discourse: In order to improve the quality of education, we have to make education more accessible to qualified students from a wider range of backgrounds. In his new book The World is Flat, Thomas L. Friedman continues his exploration of the implications of globalization and cautions Americans about the dangers of being complacent in our ability to compete in knowledge-driven markets.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.