Advertisement
HomeCollectionsInclusion
IN THE NEWS

Inclusion

NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | June 18, 2007
CHICAGO -- The fight over what to do about illegal immigration is not entirely a matter of people coming to the United States in violation of the law. It's also about what they allegedly bring with them: social pathologies. Many American think illegal immigrants are prone to all sorts of destructive behavior: committing crime, having children out of wedlock, dropping out of school and refusing to learn English. This is not a full and fair portrayal. Still, there is some truth to the charge that when we import foreigners, we also import social problems.
Advertisement
NEWS
By James Janega and James Janega,Chicago Tribune | May 26, 2007
BAGHDAD -- After an unexplained four-month absence, the radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr re-emerged for prayers yesterday at a mosque in southern Iraq, raising questions about his motivations and how his return will affect efforts to stem violence and broker reconciliation between the country's factions. In a sermon delivered to throngs of emotional supporters, the leader of the Mahdi Army militia repeated his demand for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. But he also struck a nationalistic, inclusive tone by appealing for understanding among Iraq's Shiites, Sunnis and Christians.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 25, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley, in his first commencement speech as governor, told more than 1,400 graduates at Anne Arundel Community College last night that the country and the world are waiting - and counting on them to move society forward. In a keynote speech that began with a light confession - that "Navy and Johns Hopkins [University] didn't invite me" - O'Malley praised community colleges as "where America goes to college ... very much like a community garden of opportunity." At the college's 45th commencement, under an illuminated white tent on an athletic field, O'Malley said he chose to come to the campus because of its reputation for inclusion and diversity.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Meeting set on master plan A public meeting on the proposed 2007-2016 educational facilities master plan will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Cranberry Station Elementary School, 505 N. Center St., Westminster. The superintendent's staff will present the report and take public comment. The facilities master plan will be presented to the Board of Education for approval at 5 p.m. June 13. Information: 410-751-3177. School board to meet Wednesday The Carroll County Board of Education will meet at 1 p.m. Wednesday in the boardroom at 125 N. Court St., Westminster, to approve the fiscal year 2008 operating budget categorical totals.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 5, 2007
City Councilman Robert Curran released a flock of white doves in the opening ceremony - one of the few new things at Baltimore's 90th Flower Mart yesterday. The spring fair is known for old-fashioned touches. Straw hats, maypole dances, horse-drawn carriages and lemon sticks all hark back to 1911, when it was founded by the avant-garde Women's Civic League. Now, close to a century later, it has evolved into a kaleidoscope of ages and races, a potent mix for drawing children out of schools and adults out of workplaces.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
The announcement that Bruce S. Gordon, who has headed the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for the past 19 months, will soon step down again raises questions about the role of a civil rights organization in the 21st century. Is it still relevant and can it find a strong leader? The answers should be yes. The NAACP, which will celebrate its centennial in 2009, prides itself on being the nation's oldest civil rights organization. But many question whether it has changed sufficiently with the times.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,Special to The Sun | October 15, 2006
Three months ago, Narubeth Kaewphakdee brought his 10-year-old son to Mount Airy to find a better education than what the child would get in their native Thailand. "The style of teaching is not the same," said Kaewphakdee, whose son, Boat, now attends fifth grade at Mount Airy Elementary School. "In Thailand, the student only has to memorize what the teacher has to teach. In America, they teach the student to have an opinion and to think." Last Wednesday, the same parental concern that brought Kaewphakdee to America took him to White Rock United Methodist Church in Sykesville for a school forum aimed at helping children like Boat achieve.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | September 10, 2006
When former Prince George's County educators Anne Chambers and Rebecca Randolph opened Indian Creek School in 1973, it had 33 pupils in kindergarten through second grade sharing about 5,000 square feet of space. How times have changed. Today, the school will celebrate the opening of the $17 million Upper School at the end of Anne Chambers Way in Crownsville. Its 96,000-square-feet space, including an auditorium, science labs and gym - will accommodate up to 380 students in grades eight through 12. "I didn't think we'd ever have an upper school," said Chambers, who is now head of school.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | July 16, 2006
The self-proclaimed oldest regatta on the Chesapeake Bay will, for the first time this year, include a new competitive class for Maryland Special Olympic athletes. Any Governor's Cup Yacht Race skipper who brings on board one intellectually disabled athlete (along with his or her nondisabled partner) will qualify to compete in the new class, or division, during the overnight race from Annapolis to St. Mary's College. The regatta begins Aug. 4. "We're always looking for opportunities to develop the Governor's Cup and make it something that is an interesting event beyond just the race itself," said Torre Meringolo, vice president for development at the college.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 7, 2006
Despite new rules aimed at making the Emmy Awards more inclusive and less predictable, this year's nominations, for the most part, represent business as usual in Hollywood. Though the nominations, which were announced yesterday, include a few surprises, they are unlikely to improve the credibility or enhance the prestige of the awards. Unexpected contenders for the 58th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, scheduled to be broadcast Aug. 27, include Christopher Meloni of NBC's Law & Order: Special Victims Unit for best lead actor in a drama series - though James Gandolfini of HBO's The Sopranos and Hugh Laurie of Fox's House did not make the cut. Kevin James of CBS' The King of Queens was nominated as best lead actor in a comedy series, while Jason Bateman of Fox's Arrested Development was overlooked.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.