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Incinerator

NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts , jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | December 4, 2009
Facing opposition from Edgewood residents, Harford County Executive David R. Craig has pulled the bill to have the county purchase Prologis Park, a 113-acre lot in Edgewood. Craig made the announcement hours before a County Council meeting Monday at which the issue would have been decided. The main goal in pursuing the purchase, administrators said, was to make room for an access road to the waste-to-energy facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, an incinerator that burns solid waste and turns it into energy-producing steam.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Harford County residents will have a chance to raise questions Tuesday about a controversial bill that would allow the county to build a waste-to-energy incinerator near Cunion Field, an Edgewood park popular with local children and their families. The Harford County Council is to vote on the measure, Bill No. 09-36, at a public hearing at 6 p.m. Tuesday. The bill would allow the county to purchase Prologis Park, a 113-acre commercial lot in Edgewood, for $4.9 million. The intent of the acquisition, administrators say, is to allow the county to create a new access road to an existing waste-to-energy incinerator at Aberdeen Proving Ground, a facility that has turned Harford County solid waste into energy-producing steam since 1986.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
Neighbors who fear that a plan to expand an energy-producing incinerator in Harford County will cause them traffic headaches won't know until later this year if their concerns will be addressed. The Harford County Council recently chose not to consider a proposal that would have required the Army, Baltimore County and the state to build a new access road from Route 24 to the Harford Waste-to-Energy Facility next to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Joppa as part of a proposed $400 million expansion project.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
A proposed trash incinerator and a planned natural gas plant threaten to encroach on two Civil War battlefield sites in Western Maryland, a preservation group warned yesterday. The Washington-based Civil War Preservation Trust said recent developments have put the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick and South Mountain near Middletown on its list of the nation's most endangered battlefields from that war. "In town after town, the irreplaceable battlefields that define those communities are being marred forever," said O. James Lighthizer, the trust's president.
NEWS
February 17, 2009
At first glance, it seems like a good idea. Instead of building landfills and burying millions of tons of trash, Frederick and Carroll are considering construction of a waste-to-energy plant. Advocates say the plant would reduce by 90 percent the volume of trash the two counties would have to dispose of and generate enough electricity to power 1,000 homes annually. But there are lots of reasons why this project should not be built. For one, the only plant site under consideration is in an industrial park on the edge of the Monocacy National Battlefield south of Frederick.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Accusing the state of failing to control industrial air pollution, environmental groups went to court yesterday to force the Maryland Department of the Environment to set new emission limits for a Baltimore trash incinerator. The groups also threatened to sue Atlanta-based Mirant for allegedly spewing pollutants from one of its power plants in suburban Washington. The plant has been operating for years without a permit. Activists said the actions were prompted by their frustration with the O'Malley administration for foot-dragging in dealing with pollution violations at some of the state's largest factories and power plants.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
A county plan to expand Harford's waste-to-energy plant awaits a decision on funding and bids from manufacturers, who will offer proposals to boost the energy output of the facility in Joppa. The county recently spent $10 million to upgrade air pollution controls at the 19-year-old plant and has asked the County Council for $60 million for an expansion. Officials say the project would extend the life of the county's landfill in Street and help protect the Chesapeake Bay. Contractor bids on the project are due by the end of May. "It is where we should be heading," said Robert B. Cooper, county director of public works.
NEWS
February 8, 2007
Army withdraws Ft. Meade sewage incinerator plan Facing a groundswell of opposition, Army officials announced last night that they are withdrawing plans to build a sewage sludge incinerator at Fort Meade. "It's Fort Meade's intention to terminate the project because it no longer makes good business sense," said Clyde Reynolds, public works director at the Army post. Fort Meade issued a news release stating its intention at a public hearing on the project held by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Fort Meade is proposing to build a sewage sludge incinerator, a prospect that has drawn outrage among western Anne Arundel County civic leaders and criticism from the county's top health official about the potential environmental and health impacts. The Maryland Department of the Environment is holding a public hearing tonight in Odenton to discuss plans by a Tennessee contractor, Ameresco Federal Solutions, to build the incinerator near the Army post's sewage plant adjacent to the intersection of Routes 32 and 198. The incinerator would run 24 hours a day on weekdays, disposing of hundreds of tons of sewage a year more cheaply than by trucking the waste away, county and Fort Meade officials said.
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