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NEWS
By Gwen DuBois | December 19, 2013
The students at Benjamin Franklin High School have it right. They have organized against Energy Answers' waste-to-energy incinerator planned for a location within one mile of three schools in Curtis Bay. Not only should it not be built so close to their school, it should not be built at all. Calling it a trash-burning "power plant" doesn't make it safe or change the fact that it incinerates industrial waste including old tires, plastics and construction...
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NEWS
By Gwen DuBois | December 19, 2013
The students at Benjamin Franklin High School have it right. They have organized against Energy Answers' waste-to-energy incinerator planned for a location within one mile of three schools in Curtis Bay. Not only should it not be built so close to their school, it should not be built at all. Calling it a trash-burning "power plant" doesn't make it safe or change the fact that it incinerates industrial waste including old tires, plastics and construction...
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
A citizen panel studying Anne Arundel County's future trash disposal alternatives has recommended construction of a waste-to-energy incinerator, either in the county, or jointly with a neighboring jurisdiction.The incinerator was the centerpiece of a set of recommendations the committee presented yesterday to County Executive Robert R. Neall. The other recommendations included encouraging more recycling of trash and construction debris, composting and regular disposal of household hazardous waste.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Thank you for the article "As permits expired, work began on waste to energy plant in city" (Aug. 9). I do not understand why regulators allow Energy Answers to keep going forward on their waste to energy incinerator despite missing deadlines. Waste to energy may make sense in Denmark where these plants are put in the communities that produce the waste, including wealthy communities and where there is a high rate of recycling (61 percent compared to our 29 percent) that has already reduced the waste stream before incineration.
NEWS
May 14, 1994
When the Baltimore City Council imposed a five-year moratorium on further incinerator construction, few could have anticipated that the emotionally charged issue would be revived so soon. But here is the City Council -- just two years later -- again pondering the explosive question.The reason is a proposal by the aging Pulaski incinerator's owner, Willard Hackerman. He wants to replace the East Baltimore facility's five polluting furnaces with a new $300 million waste-to-energy plant at no cost to the city.
NEWS
February 19, 1992
Environmental groups have argued that emissions and ash from a proposed municipal trash incinerator in Montgomery County would pose a health and environmental hazard.A hearing began in Rockville yesterday on whether the waste-to-energy facility should be built in rural Dickerson.Attorneys for the Audubon Naturalist Society and for two citizens' groups, including the Sugarloaf Citizens Association, are challenging the state's decision to allow the 1,800-ton-a-day facility be built.Lawyers for the county, for the Maryland Department of the Environment and for the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority countered that local and state officials had decided properly that risks to the public from the incinerator were not significant.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
Local environmentalists and Anne Arundel County officials are in sharp disagreement over the possible impact of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that requires municipal incinerator operators to test the resulting ash for hazardous materials.The environmentalists say county officials could be forced to abandon consideration of a municipal incinerator. County officials and representatives of the incinerator industry say the ruling won't change a thing.Under the ruling, ash containing high levels of toxic materials, such as lead, cadmium or mercury must be sent to a hazardous waste dump at a cost higher than $400 a ton, about eight times the cost at a regular landfill.
NEWS
March 30, 1992
Incinerators and recycling have been part of the American waste-management system since the late 1800s. The nation's first garbage incinerator was built on Governor's Island in New York in 1885. The nation's first rubbish-sorting plant for recycling was organized in New York City in 1898. Not until 1930 did New York City and Fresno, Calif., experiment with sanitary landfill technology.This time line provides some perspective on Baltimore City's current debate over incinerators. Not only is burning garbage an essential element of any comprehensive waste management system, it is one of its cornerstones.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
In a surprise maneuver that drew cheers from environmental activists, the City Council effectively halted last night any chance of a speedy decision on a proposal to replace the polluting Pulaski Highway incinerator with a state-of-the-art plant.A narrow majority of the council voted to indefinitely delay a public hearing on lifting a citywide moratorium on incinerator construction after Councilman Wilbur E. "Bill" Cunningham rose to announce the meeting would be held tonight."Councilman Cunningham, I would say that one day's notice is hardly good to citizens," Council President Mary Pat Clarke said.
NEWS
March 28, 1992
Just as Baltimore City residents are trying to grow accustomed to a system that has reduced two weekly general garbage collections to one plus a pickup of recyclables, the city's incinerator dilemma is coming to a head.Newly elected Councilman Perry Sfikas has introduced a bill that would impose a five-year moratorium on incinerators within Baltimore City. Meanwhile, businessman Willard Hackerman wants to sell the aging Pulaski incinerator to a Texas firm, which would construct an even bigger, $200 million facility there to burn trash.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | October 4, 2012
Successfully dealing with waste has been a hallmark of successful governments since human settlements evolved into cities. Rome may be remembered for its debauched emperors, but it's also remembered for its aqueducts and related sewage and garbage disposal public works structure. It's a defining characteristic of humanity that we have special places where we dispose of waste. Archaeologists call the ancient waste disposal mound sites middens, and they're regarded as valuable sources of information about how ancient people lived.
EXPLORE
December 20, 2011
Landfills, waste incinerators, sewage treatment plants, airports and any number of other industrial strength operations that feature loud noises, strong smells and other unseemly characteristics have two key things in common: everyone agrees they're needed, and everyone agrees they should be somewhere else. For a proposed trash transfer station in the works for Harford County, somewhere else for everyone except people living near the intersection of Routes 7 and 152 in Joppa is the site once known as Coleman Plecker's World of Golf.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
The owner of the trash incinerator in South Baltimore has paid a $77,500 penalty to the state for failure to control emissionsĀ of toxic mercury into the air. Wheelabrator Baltimore L.P. agreed to pay to settle allegations by the Maryland Department of the Environment and the attorney general's office that its Baltimore Refuse Energy Systems Co. waste-to-energy plantĀ on Russell Street near the stadiums had violated air pollution...
NEWS
October 27, 2011
I am responding to the recent letter by William F. Brandes ("O'Malley right on waste incinerators," Oct. 24) concerning The Sun's editorial on incinerators and the Environmental Integrity Project report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). Mr. Brandes complains that our report on the environmental and energy impacts of waste-to-energy incinerators rests on biased data. The renewable energy portfolio is supposed to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and the pollution they create.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
It's less than two months into the school year, and Gov. Martin O'Malley's grades have already slipped a little. He was marked down last week to a B+ from his usual glowing environmental marks by the Maryland League of Conservation Voters, largely on one issue: his failure to slow the proliferation of waste-to-energy incinerators in the state. That may seem a relatively minor matter, but a new report by the Environmental Integrity Project, a nonprofit advocacy group, provides ample evidence to the contrary.
NEWS
January 24, 1992
Willard Hackerman wants to sell the Pulaski incinerator. This offers Baltimore City a long-awaited opportunity to rearrange the way much of the regional waste stream is being processed.In 1981, when a partnership headed by Mr. Hackerman bought the aging Pulaski incinerator for $41 million from then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer, it got one heck of a deal. The city agreed to shoulder most of the costs of running the facility, including what now is an 85 percent share of improvements, fines and penalties.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | February 20, 1991
Michael Suder, regional manager for Wheelabrator Technologies, said that his company had heard from the Army Corps of Engineers that all federal agencies -- not the NSA specifically -- had been asked to investigate the use of alternative forms of energy.A New Hampshire-based company wants to build a trash-to-energy incinerator next to the National Security Agency at Fort Meade despite NSA's insistence that it doesn't want or need such a plant.The proposal, which several County Council members learned of during a recent tour of Wheelabrator Technologies' Baltimore plant, has some politicians worried that secret talks are under way between the company and NSA."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
The former site of a waste incinerator in Northeast Baltimore could be developed into a big-box store or warehouses or a combination under a plan being proposed by construction magnate Willard Hackerman, who has a contract to purchase the vacant, 19-acre site on Pulaski Highway from the city for more than $1 million. Hackerman, president and chief executive of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., has asked the city to designate the 6709 Pulaski Highway parcel a planned unit development, which would allow him to proceed with one of three scenarios.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
Jay Hancock 's recent column ("This waste-to-energy plant could be model for Md.," Sept. 11) leaves a false impression that the Energy Answers (EA) incinerator project planned for Baltimore is a worthy, benign renewable energy project. Children in the Brooklyn, Curtis Bay, and Hawkins Point communities will be endangered by this project. The negative health impacts associated with incinerator pollution include asthma, bronchitis, developmental delays and nerve damage. A 2008 study revealed that children living within three miles of incinerator sites were twice as likely to be diagnosed with childhood cancer.
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