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NEWS
July 19, 2002
James J. McGlothern: In an obituary published Saturday, the name of James Jefferson McGlothern's college was inadvertently omitted. Mr. McGlothern earned his bachelor's degree in 1956 from Loyola College. The Sun regrets the omission.
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NEWS
November 13, 1995
The answers to the New York Times Crossword for Nov. 5 were inadvertently omitted from Sunday's editions. The answers can be found on Page 2B in today's editions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mindy Sink and Mindy Sink,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2000
The inner workings of at least one piece of the criminal justice system can be viewed on the Internet 24 hours a day, courtesy of Web cams in the Maricopa County jail in south-central Arizona. Four cameras make up the Jail Cam (www.crime.com), which lets visitors view detainees being led into the jail in handcuffs, being fingerprinted and booked and being taken to holding cells. Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, said he had installed the Web cams as a deterrent because he figured that viewing a holding cell on the Web would convince some people that they never wanted to wind up in one. Arpaio said he had also set up the Web cams as a response to critics who accused his officers of mistreating inmates.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
Seeing a chance to stop one of the most deadly kinds of cancer before it forms, doctors at Johns Hopkins and at other hospitals around the nation are focusing on the common pancreatic cyst. Up to 20 percent of pancreatic cancer begins as one of these small, fluid-filled brown lesions. And left to grow unabated, pancreatic cancer kills 95 percent of sufferers within five years. "We have a wonderful opportunity to intervene at an early stage," Dr. Anne Marie Lennon , an assistant professor and director of a new Hopkins Multidisciplinary Pancreatic Cyst Program.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
Excuses, accusations and explanations abound for why there are minority students who can graduate from high school but do not succeed in college ("Unequal outcomes," Aug. 19). Some of the many reasons I have read include inferior public school teachers, poor curriculum, old textbooks, racial bias, bad neighborhoods, lack of two-parent family, school dress, mixed-gender classrooms and on and on. Maybe some of these are legitimate, but one reason that is not discussed is whether students want to be in college in the first place.
NEWS
By Chris Bright and Chris Bright,WORLDWATCH INSTITUTE | November 2, 1998
The physical roughness of the Earth -- its structural variety -- has tended to hold its living communities in place. The barriers that surround any particular ecosystem help set the terms of life within it. They tie a particular assemblage of plants and animals together, and they tend to exclude predators, competitors and diseases that evolved elsewhere.Islands provide the extreme case. In their isolation, many island creatures have evolved into forms found nowhere else -- the giant tortoises of the Galapagos, for example, or the colorful "picture-winged" fruit flies of Hawaii.
SPORTS
December 10, 1990
Aberdeen defensive lineman Byron Turner inadvertently was listed on both the first and second All-Metro teams published last week. Deron Young, a junior from Poly, moves up from the honorable mention list to the second team. The Evening Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 26, 2009
Zach Rose is a farmer, not a painter, but he has inadvertently created a brilliant yellow landscape in northern Harford County. His fields of sunflowers have become the talk of the town, a magnet for photographers and a mood-lifter for those who happen upon the cheerful, end-of-summer vista. When Rose planted 600 acres of sunflowers at his White Hall farm in July, he was thinking birdseed. He expects to harvest thousands of pounds of seed around the first of December from the sunflowers now in full bloom.
SPORTS
By Alan Eskew | April 28, 1993
* The following is a column written by Alan Eskew, sportswrite for The Topeka Capital-Journal, who was struck in the face Monday night by an object thrown by Kansas City Royals manager Hal McRae. KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- I feel a little bit uncomfortable writing this column. My job is to report the news, not make it. I don't seek notoriety.But suddenly and inadvertently, I'm in the news. A UFO, believed to be a tape recorder, was thrown across a room by enraged Kansas City Royals manager Hal McRae and struck me in the face after a 5-3 loss to the Detroit Tigers Monday night.
NEWS
March 7, 1997
In an article in yesterday's editions about Gov. Parris N. Glendening's appearance in "Homicide: Life on the Street," a sentence about the governor was inadvertently edited into a quote and attributed, incorrectly, to Raymond C. Feldmann, a gubernatorial spokesman. The Sun regrets the error. Pub Date: 3/07/97
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