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Implementation

NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY .. and LIZ F. KAY ..,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
The Baltimore County school system is not waiting to move forward with a plan to improve Woodlawn Middle School. The school is still in the midst of state tests that will determine whether the State Department of Education will require all staff reapply for their jobs and commit to an extended school day and year and other changes. But county school system officials said they're putting the plan into motion because even if Woodlawn Middle's 760 children reach state performance goals this year, there's no guarantee future middle-schoolers will be able to meet ever-rising targets.
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NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 3, 2006
Should I throw away my toothbrush after I've had a cold? No. Nor should you waste your money on commercially available toothbrush "sanitizers" or special mouthwashes or disinfecting solutions. Thoroughly rinsing the toothbrush with tap water "does remove most of what's caught there," said Dr. Dana Graves, a professor of periodontology and oral biology at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine. And leaving the brush uncovered so it can dry between uses or using a toothpaste containing a disinfectant also helps reduce the amount of live bacteria and viruses on the brush.
NEWS
By Amy Rosewater and Amy Rosewater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2005
Craig Burris likes to play basketball and lift weights a few days a week. Sometimes he'll work out at a gym near his home, the Bel Air Athletic Club, which he pays for out of his own pocket. But if he wants to, he can work out for free at the Merritt Athletic Club in Canton, just about a four-minute drive from his office at SmartCEO magazine in the Can Company. It's just one of the perks of his job. And it's not just because he's the publisher. Burris and all 18 of his colleagues are members of the Merritt Athletic Club.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
After being sued by environmental activists, federal and state officials yesterday announced a new get-tough policy for sewage treatment plants that don't meet pollution limits meant to protect the Chesapeake Bay. Plants that spew unhealthy levels of nitrogen and phosphorus, which feed algae blooms and create low-oxygen "dead zones," will be fined up to $32,500 per day per violation, said Robert Summers, director of water management at the Maryland Department...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2005
TAKOMA PARK - Larry Hodes had the do-it-yourself concept, the steel pipe and all the time an early retirement allows, yet something was missing. He went looking for it on a recent Saturday at the local tool lending library. Where else to spend such a sublime spring day but inside a trailer the size of a large Dumpster, fenced in chain link and barbed wire? The sun didn't shine on these many saws and hammers, nor on the workbench where Hodes spent hours pursuing visions of a dolly to wheel his canoe from place to place.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
It's like the superhero of library cards: flashy and vibrant in appearance, and able to leap over county borders in a single bound. Public librarians across Maryland are preparing to unleash the new MPOWER card, which gives the bearer the ability to borrow from any of Maryland's 174 public libraries. Yesterday, state officials chose the new library in Odenton - a fast-developing part of Anne Arundel County near the Howard County line - as the venue in which to unveil the eye-catching turquoise card, which presents different images as the holder tilts the card at various angles.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
A group of city officers suing the Baltimore Police Department has added to its allegations of racial discrimination, claiming that Mayor Martin O'Malley failed to implement his own recommendations for overhauling the department's internal discipline system. An amended lawsuit filed this month points to a 1998 report by then-Councilman O'Malley that made recommendations for curtailing racial discrimination in the department. "None of these recommendations has been implemented by the BPD, despite clear knowledge that centralized, subjective decision-making in the discipline system has had and continues to have a disparate impact on African-Americans," the revised lawsuit states.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | November 14, 2004
Have you found yourself in your company's 401(k) retirement plan but don't remember signing up? That's not surprising. More and more employers are automatically enrolling workers in their defined-contribution plans. It's legal if they warn you ahead of time and give you the option to decline. First, companies automatically signed up only new workers, then expanded the program to include all employees. This year, the Internal Revenue Service, which regulates 401(k) plans, said companies could not only automatically sign up workers, but also could increase contributions each year.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
An independent audit of Baltimore schools has found numerous shortcomings in the instructional program, ranging from teachers' inability to hold students to high academic standards to a well-funded but disorganized system of training school staff. The audit, released Friday by the school system, was one of several "corrective actions" that the state ordered it to undertake because of a high percentage of failing schools. Unlike other recent reviews of the system's finances and operations, this audit examined the city schools' ability to teach a consistent curriculum and develop an effective teaching staff.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2004
The storied Oakland Mills boys soccer program, winner of a record 12 state championships, has a new look, a new feel and a new coach. Because 29-year coaching legend Don Shea declined to sign his yearly coaching contract after 18 seasons and eight state titles at Oakland Mills, Scorpions players now are adjusting to 28-year-old Mike Libber's ideas about running a successful soccer program. The differences between the two coaches are pronounced. Shea employed a direct North-South style that emphasized speed and defense; Libber teaches a more deliberate East-West style that emphasizes passing and offense.
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