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By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
Anne Arundel County's chief executive is seeking to create a storm-water management fund that would generate at least $5 million a year to repair waterways damaged by future construction. County Executive John R. Leopold, a Republican, said yesterday that he will introduce legislation to the County Council on Monday to create a fee paid by property owners based on the amount of impervious surfaces, such as driveways, parking lots and home additions, they create. It would raise at least five times the amount of the current storm drainage fee, which would be eliminated, but far less than a fee that environmentalists wanted imposed on all property owners.
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NEWS
August 27, 2014
The misinformation in Susan Shaw's letter ( "State should clean up its act Aug. 22) compelled me to write this. She says don't blame commercial real estate for overflows because they don't overflow. She goes on to say the overflows were the state's fault. Actually, the overflows are Baltimore City's fault since its operates the wastewater treatment system where the overflows occurred. But even blaming the city is off the mark. Ms. Shaw fails to recognize a central fact. When it comes to water, everything is downstream.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
THERE'S A MESSAGE for the future of Maryland's 9,000 miles of freshwater streams in Montgomery County's decision a couple of years ago to limit development along some 20 miles of the upper Paint Branch, where trout thrive not far from the Capital Beltway. The suburban county allocated $13.5 million, its whole parks acquisition budget for six years, to preserve open space in the little stream's watershed. Only then could they ensure that "impervious surfaces" would never amount to more than 10 percent of the lands draining runoff from rainfall to Paint Branch, a local icon of environmental quality.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
I have followed David Craig throughout his administration as Harford County Executive, and he has been governing from a moderate right-of-center position. It seems now he is running for governor he has chosen to pander to the extreme uninformed wing in his party with his recent comments regarding water pollution and run-off into the Chesapeake Bay ( "Harford's Craig to seek repeal of local 'rain tax,'" Sept. 17). He has chosen to take an easy rhetorical approach in opposing the so-called "rain tax. " It is pretty easy to be against a tax on "rain.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
I have followed David Craig throughout his administration as Harford County Executive, and he has been governing from a moderate right-of-center position. It seems now he is running for governor he has chosen to pander to the extreme uninformed wing in his party with his recent comments regarding water pollution and run-off into the Chesapeake Bay ( "Harford's Craig to seek repeal of local 'rain tax,'" Sept. 17). He has chosen to take an easy rhetorical approach in opposing the so-called "rain tax. " It is pretty easy to be against a tax on "rain.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
The misinformation in Susan Shaw's letter ( "State should clean up its act Aug. 22) compelled me to write this. She says don't blame commercial real estate for overflows because they don't overflow. She goes on to say the overflows were the state's fault. Actually, the overflows are Baltimore City's fault since its operates the wastewater treatment system where the overflows occurred. But even blaming the city is off the mark. Ms. Shaw fails to recognize a central fact. When it comes to water, everything is downstream.
NEWS
August 11, 2001
THE GOALS were put forth 39 years ago: reduce the nation's water-polluting discharges to zero and make waterways clean enough for swimming and fishing. We haven't come close to meeting those ambitious targets, contained in the Clean Water Act of 1972. But the debate taking place among members of the Anne Arundel County Council right now provides one example of the progress since the days when little attention was paid to the harm that development can do to streams, rivers and oceans - and estuaries like our Chesapeake Bay. The Arundel council is debating the degree to which commercial property owners must reduce storm runoff - especially from asphalt parking lots and rooftops - if they decide to redevelop their property.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Hoping to reduce storm water runoff into Chesapeake Bay tributaries, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has proposed one of the state's toughest limits for impervious surfaces, such as parking lots and roofs, on redeveloped properties. Under the ordinance introduced at Monday's City Council meeting, those redeveloping property, with some exceptions, would be required to cut by 50 percent the amount of existing surface area that does not absorb or filter water. State law and city code now require a 20 percent reduction for redeveloped properties.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Seeking to avoid a complicated fight in an election year, county officials have decided to set aside efforts to reform the "critical areas" environmental protection law until voters select a successor for outgoing County Executive Janet S. Owens. County leaders reached their decision after a series of recent public meetings on proposed revisions to critical area laws, which regulate development within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. While the county said it has significantly revised the bill based on forum input, residents said they need more time to study the changes.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Anne Arundel County's stormwater fee hasn't been collected yet, but the County Council has already changed it. By a 7-0 vote Monday night, council members agreed to reduce the maximum fee that commercial property owners would pay and to phase in the fee for some property owners. The changes were made to make the stormwater fee more palatable to County Executive Laura Neuman, who vetoed the stormwater fee that the council passed earlier this spring. Owners of nonresidential properties still must pay based on the percentage of their lot that's covered by impervious surfaces such as parking lots and rooftops.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Anne Arundel County's stormwater fee hasn't been collected yet, but the County Council has already changed it. By a 7-0 vote Monday night, council members agreed to reduce the maximum fee that commercial property owners would pay and to phase in the fee for some property owners. The changes were made to make the stormwater fee more palatable to County Executive Laura Neuman, who vetoed the stormwater fee that the council passed earlier this spring. Owners of nonresidential properties still must pay based on the percentage of their lot that's covered by impervious surfaces such as parking lots and rooftops.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
The compromise Del. Maggie McIntosh brokered among environmentalists, the O'Malley administration and builders over storm water regulations that are set to go into effect this spring will mean more pollution flowing into the Chesapeake Bay, more erosion, less clean drinking water and assorted other environmental damage. But it could have been much, much worse. Powerful political figures, including Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., were arguing that the storm water regulations would set back smart growth efforts, promote sprawl and hurt the environment -- an overblown concern but one that created an opening for developers and their allies to gut the new regulations altogether.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
The Anne Arundel County Council will debate legislation that would charge most homeowners $30 a year to pay for repairs to damaged local waterways, after its proponents found an unlikely ally: a councilman who fiercely opposes the bill. C. Edward Middlebrooks cast the crucial fourth vote Monday night, amending County Executive John R. Leopold's so-called SMART fund. While Leopold's plan would levy a fee only on property owners who built new impervious surfaces, such as patios, homes and parking lots, the new legislation calls for an "all-payer" system that would also include a sliding-scale charge on most commercial and industrial properties.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
Anne Arundel County's chief executive is seeking to create a storm-water management fund that would generate at least $5 million a year to repair waterways damaged by future construction. County Executive John R. Leopold, a Republican, said yesterday that he will introduce legislation to the County Council on Monday to create a fee paid by property owners based on the amount of impervious surfaces, such as driveways, parking lots and home additions, they create. It would raise at least five times the amount of the current storm drainage fee, which would be eliminated, but far less than a fee that environmentalists wanted imposed on all property owners.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | July 15, 2007
Recent reports on the health of the Chesapeake Bay paint a dismal picture. An Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program report noted that water quality has shown little progress since 1985, and levels of nitrogen and phosphorus - the nutrient pollutants that are the focus of cleanup efforts - show no real long-term improvement. Evidence of these excessive nutrients showed up in recent large fish kills in Baltimore's harbor and in Annapolis' Weems Creek. Bay grasses, essential for crabs and fish, are far short of the goal of 185,000 acres set in 2000 by the Chesapeake Bay Agreement, which drives bay restoration.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | March 8, 2007
The delegate sponsoring a proposed fee on development to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay has offered to give millions of dollars to local governments in an effort to win their support. In addition, Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, chairwoman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, proposed amendments to the Chesapeake Bay Green Fund bill that would allow exemptions for developers who limit runoff. The fee on construction projects -- backed by environmentalists, the O'Malley administration and House Speaker Michael E. Busch -- would raise about $130 million a year for programs to reduce farm runoff and storm-water pollution.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
The Anne Arundel County Council will debate legislation that would charge most homeowners $30 a year to pay for repairs to damaged local waterways, after its proponents found an unlikely ally: a councilman who fiercely opposes the bill. C. Edward Middlebrooks cast the crucial fourth vote Monday night, amending County Executive John R. Leopold's so-called SMART fund. While Leopold's plan would levy a fee only on property owners who built new impervious surfaces, such as patios, homes and parking lots, the new legislation calls for an "all-payer" system that would also include a sliding-scale charge on most commercial and industrial properties.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | March 8, 2007
The delegate sponsoring a proposed fee on development to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay has offered to give millions of dollars to local governments in an effort to win their support. In addition, Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, chairwoman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, proposed amendments to the Chesapeake Bay Green Fund bill that would allow exemptions for developers who limit runoff. The fee on construction projects -- backed by environmentalists, the O'Malley administration and House Speaker Michael E. Busch -- would raise about $130 million a year for programs to reduce farm runoff and storm-water pollution.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Hoping to reduce storm water runoff into Chesapeake Bay tributaries, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has proposed one of the state's toughest limits for impervious surfaces, such as parking lots and roofs, on redeveloped properties. Under the ordinance introduced at Monday's City Council meeting, those redeveloping property, with some exceptions, would be required to cut by 50 percent the amount of existing surface area that does not absorb or filter water. State law and city code now require a 20 percent reduction for redeveloped properties.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Seeking to avoid a complicated fight in an election year, county officials have decided to set aside efforts to reform the "critical areas" environmental protection law until voters select a successor for outgoing County Executive Janet S. Owens. County leaders reached their decision after a series of recent public meetings on proposed revisions to critical area laws, which regulate development within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. While the county said it has significantly revised the bill based on forum input, residents said they need more time to study the changes.
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