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Impeachment Trial

NEWS
October 30, 2013
Your front page article on the scandals surrounding the gubernatorial candidacy of Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler included a photograph of former President Bill Clinton over the caption "Survived Monica Lewinsky scandal and impeachment trial" ( "Surviving scandal, or not," Oct. 26). One of the only good things to come out of this sordid chapter in U.S. history was that reporters as well as the public came to understand, if only briefly, the correct definition of the word "impeachment.
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NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Now comes the real test: Can U.S. senators, used to being masters of their universe, follow guidelines on decorum for President Clinton's impeachment trial that seem more appropriate for schoolchildren?Senate Republican leaders, perhaps fearing the worst from lawmakers who often conduct themselves like feudal lords, issued yesterday "general guidance for proper behavior as senators sit as impeachment trial jurors."The tips for avoiding rudeness include:"Senators should plan to be in attendance at all times during the proceedings."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland is recovering in a Baltimore hospital after surgery yesterday morning to remove her inflamed gallbladder. She is expected to be released sometime today."She is doing fine, resting comfortably," said Mona Miller, Mikulski's spokeswoman. "Her doctors recommended that she stay in the hospital overnight for rest and observation."Mikulski, a 62-year-old Democrat who won her third term in November, checked herself into Mercy Medical Center on Tuesday, complaining of severe flu-like symptoms.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
IT TAKES neither genie nor wise man to be wary of coming attractions this January.In this new year, may sane and sensible minds in the Senate accede to the urging -- no, the demands -- of the American people who desperately desire a quick end to the national nightmare called impeachment. Otherwise, it is going to be a long, cold winter and national discontent may reach the boiling point.The first major event of January, the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton impacts the month's second important congressional attraction -- President Clinton's State of the Union Address.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
IT TAKES neither genie nor wise man to be wary of coming attractions this January.In this new year, may sane and sensible minds in the Senate accede to the urging -- no, the demands -- of the American people who desperately desire a quick end to the national nightmare called impeachment. Otherwise, it is going to be a long, cold winter and national discontent may reach the boiling point.The first major event of January, the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton impacts the month's second important congressional attraction -- President Clinton's State of the Union Address.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 21, 1993
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Clearing the way for an impeachment trial, Venezuela's Supreme Court ruled yesterday that grounds existed to prosecute President Carlos Andres Perez on charges of embezzling and misappropriating $17 million in government funds.Today, Mr. Perez is expected to be stripped of his presidential powers by a Senate vote giving final authorization for Venezuela's first presidential impeachment trial.AMr. Perez's fall would end the career of a grand old man of Latin American politics, a 70-year-old survivor of jailings, exile, Communist guerrillas and, last year, two military coup attempts.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski missed a trio of votes yesterday at President Clinton's impeachment trial, deciding to skip them so she could rest before gall bladder surgery this morning.Although she participated earlier in the day in Capitol Hill discussions involving the trial, Mikulski decided later to return to her North Baltimore apartment to prepare for the surgery, an aide said last night.Mikulski spokeswoman Mona Miller said the senator consulted with her physician about her ailment -- an infected gall bladder -- and with Minority Leader Tom Daschle before deciding to have the surgery done today.
NEWS
January 8, 1999
WITH THE Senate embarking upon an impeachment trial that lacks public support, it is refreshing to have a speaker of the House who appears to be what the people want: Someone who can work with others to get a job done.J. Dennis Hastert, the low-key former teacher from small-town Illinois, shows none of the fire of his Republican predecessor, Newt Gingrich, or the naked ambition of the Democratic minority leader, Richard A. Gephardt. He has demonstrated none of the stature of such predecessors as Democrat Tip O'Neill or fellow Illinois Republican Robert H. Michel.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The 106th Congress began yesterday with new House Speaker Dennis Hastert vowing a season of bipartisanship even as senators nearby prepared to launch a bitter impeachment trial against President Clinton. As always, congressional children in miniature suits and satin dresses clambered over furniture on this swearing-in day, but the backdrop for the starting ceremonies for the House and Senate was hardly so fancy-free. In the Senate, 100 senators prepared to be sworn in today as jurors in Clinton's impeachment trial by Chief Justice William Rehnquist.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist went back across the street yesterday to his day job at the Supreme Court. Along with a plaque and the memory of a standing ovation from an appreciative Senate, Rehnquist took with him fresh insights into the way Congress works.The final six minutes of the five weeks that Rehnquist spent in the Senate chamber presiding over Clinton's impeachment trial, were, in fact, the chief justice's moment, unlike anything a judge would experience at the end of a normal court trial.
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