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FEATURES
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2008
Andrea Wilson felt sick to her stomach when she heard comedian Bernie Mac had died Saturday in a Chicago hospital. Her private fear - the fear of sudden death - was suddenly splashed across the news. Like Mac, Wilson has sarcoidosis, a mysterious and sometimes devastating immune system disorder that causes cells to cluster and can damage organs throughout the body. Last year, the disease jumped to her brain and started causing strokelike symptoms - vision changes, numbness in her left side, tingling in her face and mouth - as well as extreme pain.
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FEATURES
July 3, 2008
A federal advisory panel has endorsed two new combination vaccines designed to reduce the number of needle sticks children must endure to get the recommended immunizations. The panel approved a four-in-one shot made by GlaxoSmithKline. It offers protection against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio, and costs $45. It's given once to preschool-age children. The panel also endorsed Sanofi Pasteur's five-in-one shot for diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and illness because of Haemophilus influenzae type b, or HiB. It costs about $69. Youngsters get four doses by age 2. Both combination shots were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
After 16 years of guiding MedImmune Inc. from a struggling Gaithersburg biotech to one of the world's most profitable, Chief Executive David M. Mott is stepping down for personal reasons, the company's London-based parent, AstraZeneca PLC, said yesterday. Tony Zook, CEO of AstraZeneca's North American business based in Wilmington, Del., will succeed Mott when he leaves at the end of July. The announcement surprised local biotech representatives, who look to Mott, 42, as a role model in an industry the state considers among its best hopes for economic growth.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
When Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. first introduced a needle-free flu vaccine five years ago, shareholders were as excited as the kids who needed it. So far, the product has fallen short of expectations. But that could change after a federal panel that advises the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended yesterday that all children, from six months of age to 18, be vaccinated for the flu. If adopted by the CDC, an additional 30 million children would need immunizations.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2008
For years, the scientific evidence has been accumulating. The latest, published this week, once again showed that thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative long used in childhood vaccines, does not cause the neurological disorders associated with the U.S. autism epidemic. In fact, scientists at the California Department of Public Health demonstrated that in the years since nearly all thimerosal was removed from vaccines in 2001, the rate of autism has continued to rise there.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
While the release of the Mitchell Report sparked debates about major league baseball players' Hall of Fame worthiness and tainted record books, the issue of performance-enhancing drugs is much more personal to others. "This is more than about asterisks and cheating; it's about the lives and health of our kids," Don Hooton said Thursday at the Mitchell Report news conference in New York. Hooton's 17-year-old son, Taylor, committed suicide in 2003 after using anabolic steroids. Powered by ME!
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | December 8, 2007
MedImmune has been able to double the number of potential products in development to 100 since the Maryland biotech was acquired last spring by drug giant AstraZeneca, David M. Mott, MedImmune's president and chief executive officer, said yesterday. Since AstraZeneca agreed to pay $15.6 billion for MedImmune in April, the Gaithersburg biotech has been put in charge of the British firm's biologics units -- Cambridge Antibody Technology in England and a research facility in Hayward, Calif.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting the deep divisions within Congress over granting legal immunity to telephone companies for cooperating with the Bush administration's program of wiretapping without warrants, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a new domestic surveillance law yesterday that sidestepped the issue. By a 10-9 vote, the committee approved an overhaul of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that dropped a key provision for immunity for telecommunications companies that another committee had already approved.
NEWS
By Lee H. Hamilton | November 4, 2007
If the local fire company asked for your help putting out a neighbor's blaze, you would not force the firefighters to justify their request. You would just help, right? That's what the phone companies did when the Bush administration asked them in secret for help with wiretaps to target al-Qaida communications into and out of the country. However, the president's warrantless wiretap program caused a furor when it became public. The administration had circumvented the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, raising many doubts about the legality and even constitutionality of its wiretap program.
NEWS
November 1, 2007
The dumb promises of immunity must have been the last straw. The State Department capped its astonishing record of mismanagement of private security firms in Iraq in a fairly spectacular way, by making an offer of immunity it didn't have the power to grant, to the Blackwater USA guards who were involved in the notorious shoot-'em-up in Baghdad's Nisour Square. Condoleezza Rice has now given way to Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who wants to put diplomats' private guards under military control.
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