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NEWS
By David Kidwell and John Chase and David Kidwell and John Chase,Chicago Tribune | December 22, 2008
A key figure in Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich's alleged scheme to sell a U.S. Senate seat has sought immunity from federal authorities in return for his cooperation in their investigation. Raghuveer P. Nayak, an Oak Brook businessman and political fundraiser, is the unnamed "Individual D" who prosecutors say was being squeezed by the governor for campaign cash in return for appointing Rep. Jesse L. Jackson Jr. to the Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama, sources said.
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NEWS
September 14, 2008
The Baltimore County Department of Health will hold an immunization clinic from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow at the Woodlawn Health Center, 1811 Woodlawn Drive, for students who haven't had their required shots. No appointment is necessary and immunizations are free. Parents must show a copy of their child's immunization record for the walk-in clinic. The 2008-2009 school year immunization requirements include chickenpox and hepatitis B vaccination for children entering preschool programs through 11th grade.
FEATURES
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2008
Andrea Wilson felt sick to her stomach when she heard comedian Bernie Mac had died Saturday in a Chicago hospital. Her private fear - the fear of sudden death - was suddenly splashed across the news. Like Mac, Wilson has sarcoidosis, a mysterious and sometimes devastating immune system disorder that causes cells to cluster and can damage organs throughout the body. Last year, the disease jumped to her brain and started causing strokelike symptoms - vision changes, numbness in her left side, tingling in her face and mouth - as well as extreme pain.
FEATURES
July 3, 2008
A federal advisory panel has endorsed two new combination vaccines designed to reduce the number of needle sticks children must endure to get the recommended immunizations. The panel approved a four-in-one shot made by GlaxoSmithKline. It offers protection against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio, and costs $45. It's given once to preschool-age children. The panel also endorsed Sanofi Pasteur's five-in-one shot for diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and illness because of Haemophilus influenzae type b, or HiB. It costs about $69. Youngsters get four doses by age 2. Both combination shots were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
After 16 years of guiding MedImmune Inc. from a struggling Gaithersburg biotech to one of the world's most profitable, Chief Executive David M. Mott is stepping down for personal reasons, the company's London-based parent, AstraZeneca PLC, said yesterday. Tony Zook, CEO of AstraZeneca's North American business based in Wilmington, Del., will succeed Mott when he leaves at the end of July. The announcement surprised local biotech representatives, who look to Mott, 42, as a role model in an industry the state considers among its best hopes for economic growth.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
When Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. first introduced a needle-free flu vaccine five years ago, shareholders were as excited as the kids who needed it. So far, the product has fallen short of expectations. But that could change after a federal panel that advises the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended yesterday that all children, from six months of age to 18, be vaccinated for the flu. If adopted by the CDC, an additional 30 million children would need immunizations.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2008
For years, the scientific evidence has been accumulating. The latest, published this week, once again showed that thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative long used in childhood vaccines, does not cause the neurological disorders associated with the U.S. autism epidemic. In fact, scientists at the California Department of Public Health demonstrated that in the years since nearly all thimerosal was removed from vaccines in 2001, the rate of autism has continued to rise there.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
While the release of the Mitchell Report sparked debates about major league baseball players' Hall of Fame worthiness and tainted record books, the issue of performance-enhancing drugs is much more personal to others. "This is more than about asterisks and cheating; it's about the lives and health of our kids," Don Hooton said Thursday at the Mitchell Report news conference in New York. Hooton's 17-year-old son, Taylor, committed suicide in 2003 after using anabolic steroids. Powered by ME!
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | December 8, 2007
MedImmune has been able to double the number of potential products in development to 100 since the Maryland biotech was acquired last spring by drug giant AstraZeneca, David M. Mott, MedImmune's president and chief executive officer, said yesterday. Since AstraZeneca agreed to pay $15.6 billion for MedImmune in April, the Gaithersburg biotech has been put in charge of the British firm's biologics units -- Cambridge Antibody Technology in England and a research facility in Hayward, Calif.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Reflecting the deep divisions within Congress over granting legal immunity to telephone companies for cooperating with the Bush administration's program of wiretapping without warrants, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a new domestic surveillance law yesterday that sidestepped the issue. By a 10-9 vote, the committee approved an overhaul of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that dropped a key provision for immunity for telecommunications companies that another committee had already approved.
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