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HEALTH
By Susan Reimer | August 11, 2011
My fellow mothers used to tease me about being first in line for any new childhood vaccination: hepatitis, meningitis, HPV. If it came in a syringe and it promised to protect my kids from some terrible disease, I was all in. So it should come as no surprise that as the sun came up on my 60th birthday, I could be found in line for the shingles vaccine for which I was now officially eligible. The one-time shot should protect me from the painful — and often debilitating — eruption of the dormant chicken pox virus lurking in the nerve endings of everyone who ever had that childhood disease.
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EXPLORE
June 28, 2011
In an effort to increase the immunization rates for school-age children, the Harford County Health Department will be holding early Back-to School Immunization Clinics for uninsured and underinsured students. Each year, the Harford County Health Department holds Back-to School Immunization Clinics to help students become up-to-date with their vaccinations. This year, clinics will be on Tuesdays throughout July and August at the Edgewood office, 1321 Woodbridge Station Way. Morning and evening times are available and the public is invited to call 410-612-1774 to schedule an appointment.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Maryland was a winner in the last round of military base reorganizations, but the state should keep an eye on the competition in preparing for the future, according to the official who headed the realignment. "Don't assume you are untouchable or immune to closures in the future. You're not," Anthony J. Principi, who was chairman of the 2005 federal Base Closure and Realignment Commission, said at a Friday event. "You need to assess your community's strengths and weaknesses today.
HEALTH
By Susan Reimer | February 9, 2011
My husband says he doesn't need a flu shot because he's never had the flu. Which, if you think about it, is a lot like saying you don't need to use contraception because you've never gotten pregnant. He didn't give me a scientific reason for not getting a flu shot, unless you consider superstition a branch of medicine. Like too many Americans, he thinks a flu shot renders you vulnerable to the flu. Cosmically, if not physically. It is like you are testing fate. A flu shot, he reasons, will cause his lucky streak of flu-less winters to come to an end. It is a hard argument to counter, especially when it is made by a guy who thinks winning at video poker is a matter of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
From the outside, Don Pedro's Musica Latina on Broadway looks like anything but a music store. You might guess it's a country-western emporium. Maybe even a secondhand sports-equipment store. Inside its display window, there are soccer balls, wool leopard-print comforters and dozens of sneaker boxes. But behind all that is where its real product lies: some 200,000 CDs from everywhere in Latin America. For years, Baltimore's ethnic music stores like this one were spared from the digital music revolution that consumed their American counterparts because of their deep catalogs.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
When is a police officer pursuing a suspect? It might seem like an easy question to answer. But lawyers and judges in three Maryland courts argued for four years over what that means — all because of a minor collision that occurred in 2006 involving a Baltimore police cruiser. Maryland's Court of Appeals, with three judges dissenting, settled on a definition Tuesday: "There must be at a minimum movement by a suspect or violator of the law, and reactive movement by the officer to apprehend said individual.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
This time last year, health officials were scrambling to protect kids going back to school against what was feared to be an exceptionally deadly flu outbreak. And while that scare has passed, they don't want parents to lower their guard as another academic year approaches. The H1N1 flu pandemic was far milder than anticipated and was officially declared over this week by the World Health Organization. But it disproportionately affected young people, and the message is still about vaccination.
NEWS
By Peter Beilenson | July 21, 2010
This week, Baltimore is privileged to host an international conference sponsored by the preeminent global immunization advocacy organization, the GAVI Alliance. Launched in 2000 at the star-studded gathering of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the GAVI Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation) was founded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the vaccine industry, among others. Pneumococcal disease and rotavirus, a virulent form of diarrhea, are the top two killers of children in the 70 or so most impoverished countries in the world — those where the average income is less than $3 per day. It has traditionally taken 10 to 15 years for vaccines we in America take for granted to reach people in these most impoverished places, with a particularly huge death toll in children under 5 — more than 2 million each year.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 17, 2010
After Lyndon Johnson was elected to Congress in 1937, he got word that a liberal magazine, The New Republic, was going to profile him alongside other New Deal stalwarts. Johnson was horrified. He called a friend from the International Labor Organization and begged her to find some prominent labor figure to repudiate him. If "they put out that ... I'm a liberal hero up here," LBJ sputtered, "I'll get killed. You've got to find somebody to denounce me!" Alas, Mickey Kaus, the blogger turned California Democratic Senate candidate, has even bigger problems.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Prosecutors argued Wednesday before Maryland's second-highest court that bribery charges against Baltimore Councilwoman Helen L. Holton should be reinstated, contending that a lower court judge erred in barring the introduction of her votes on tax breaks for developers. The arguments in front of the Court of Special Appeals were the most recent chapter in Holton's lengthy legal battle on charges of bribery and a campaign finance violation. Holton, chairwoman of the council's powerful Taxation and Finance Committee, was accused of receiving donations for a political poll from two Baltimore business leaders whose project received a tax break from her committee.
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