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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - As many as 30 foreigners whose visas were revoked because of terrorism concerns may still be in the country because the State Department failed to pass vital information to the FBI and border agents in time to stop them from entering the country, congressional investigators said yesterday. Jess T. Ford, director of international affairs and trade at the General Accounting Office (GAO), told a congressional panel that the government agencies were doing little to track down the people or to investigate how much of a danger they pose.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer Allison Morse contributed to this article | June 21, 1993
OAKDALE, La. -- At the federal corrections complex in this central Louisiana backwater, the parade of nations rivals any Olympic ceremony. Inmates from 72 countries finish their time here for a host of criminal offenses and await America's final farewell -- deportation.There's the Colombian who was convicted in a cocaine ring that operated on an upstate New York dairy farm. The Israeli, a heroin salesman, who, if deported, won't readily be able to return to the United States to see his American daughter.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | September 17, 1998
SEATTLE -- Americans and Canadians could face huge lines and delays of 12 hours or more at U.S.-Canada border crossings if an immigration law takes effect as written next month.Critics say any border jam-up will be the result of Rep. Lamar Smith's crusade to crack down on immigration. Two years ago, Congress passed a provision sponsored by the Texas Republican requiring that border officers check records of all noncitizens entering and leaving the country.The Immigration and Naturalization Service says it does not have the manpower or the technology to fully conduct such checks, which are supposed to go into effect Oct. 1.But local officials and business leaders warn that even a half-hearted attempt by the INS to obey the law would cause record delays, with potentially crippling effects on U.S.-Canada trade.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Zoe Baird, Bill Clinton's nominee to be attorney general, employed two Peruvians living illegally in the United States as her baby sitter and part-time driver for nearly two years, government and Clinton transition officials said yesterday.Transition officials said the couple began working for Ms. Baird in the summer of 1990, when she was about to take a job at Aetna Life and Casualty in Hartford, Conn. The husband stopped working for Ms. Baird in March 1992, but the wife continued to help care for her 3-year-old son until the woman left or was dismissed shortly after the election.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Describing the nation's immigration system as inept and indifferent, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings announced legislation they said would streamline the process for soldiers seeking to become U.S. citizens. The legislation was inspired by the death of Army Reserve Spc. Kendell K. Frederick, 21, of Randallstown, who was killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq on Oct. 19. Frederick, a native of Trinidad, moved to Baltimore County when he was 15. He died while returning from a trip off base to have fingerprints made for his U.S. citizenship application.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory commission proposed yesterday that the government establish a computerized registry of the names and Social Security numbers of all citizens and aliens authorized to work in the United States, so that employers could check the immigration status of job applicants.In a unanimous recommendation, the nine-member advisory panel, the Commission on Immigration Reform, which is headed by Barbara Jordan, a former Democratic congresswoman from Texas, said the measures were needed to curb the hiring of illegal aliens.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | February 9, 2008
Last summer, Sidney Bonilla applied to become a United States citizen, taking a step toward security, empowerment and the right to vote in the country he has called home for half his life. But seven months later, the El Salvador native waits, one of more than a million applicants caught in an unprecedented backlog of naturalization cases nationwide. He is frustrated with the process and the uncertainty that comes with the long wait. "This is where I grew up; this is my home," said Bonilla, a construction worker in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- When 151 Chinese men came ashore on Haiti's southwest coast before dawn on Sunday, startling residents at a beach resort, they had sailed for more than a month from port to port halfway around the world in a small fishing boat, a U.S. immigration official said yesterday.Their ordeal was described by the official, Bruce J. Nicholl of the Immigration and Naturalization Service's anti-smuggling unit, as the first convincing evidence of a new pattern in a multimillion-dollar business of trafficking illegal immigrants operated by gangs in Hong Kong and major U.S. cities.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The Baltimore office in which federal officials grant citizenship to immigrants is moving to its own building on the city's outskirts, where it will no longer be housed with the agency that deports people. The Maryland office of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and its more than 120 workers will open the new facility Jan. 15, ending its 12-year tenure in the G.H. Fallon Federal Building. Officials say the agency needs to establish its own identity and relationship with the immigrant community.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2002
The Foreign-born Information and Referral Network - a Columbia nonprofit organization with the ambitious goal of helping immigrants start new lives in America - is struggling with a roughly $50,000 deficit, the largest in its 20-year history. The only organization in Maryland that works comprehensively with all foreign-born people, FIRN has gone back to budgeting basics as it tries to lift itself out of debt. And its basic premise is, "We get the money first, and we spend it second," said Dawn Fisk Thomsen, the group's interim director.
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