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FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1991
Imagine all the people . . . wearing John Lennon's eyeglasses.Although people have emulated the late singer's style for close to three decades by wearing round, wire-rimmed glasses, until this month none of those frames had the cachet of his signature on the inside of the right temple.Now New Jersey-based Eagle Eyewear is launching the first four models in the John Lennon collection of eye- and sunglasses for men, women and teen-agers. Priced at $70 to $80 in metal or plastic and expected in local stores by the end of this month or early March, the styles are named after popular Lennon songs or albums -- "Revolution," "Imagine," "The Walrus" and "Double Fantasy."
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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | August 27, 2006
I'll assume that the speeches given at yesterday's Orioles Hall of Fame ceremony were quite moving. I can only imagine, since the PA system here is so bad, you can't understand a single word in the press box. Now that Chris Hoiles and Doug DeCinces have been inducted, I'm wondering which former Orioles are next in line? Mike Bordick? B.J. Surhoff? Will all be forgiven after Mike Mussina retires? It's hard to imagine an Orioles Hall of Fame without Moose. I'm going to assume that there's not enough forgiveness for Rafael Palmeiro, but I'd be interested in your opinion.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Imagine the barn-raising sequence from "Witness" or "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers."Now imagine it with 4,000 old tires.That was the scene yesterday in Patapsco Valley State Park as more than 200 volunteers built a playground, working from designs developed by the New Hampshire-based Learning Structures Inc.The project -- a cooperative effort by the Maryland Environmental Service, the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of the Environment --...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 23, 1999
Imagine a historic Ruxton stone mansion, surrounded by 25 acres of rolling lawns, gardens, woods, ponds and fountains. Now imagine a perfect spring afternoon. Two gleaming white tents are pitched amid the greenery, and some 600 guests stroll the grounds, sipping drinks and dining on a seemingly endless supply of shrimp. That was the scene at the tony Tea at Tyrconnell, which raised $70,000 for AIDS Action Baltimore.Spotted among the swanky set: Lynda Dee, executive director of AIDS Action Baltimore; event chair Joe Platerote; event committee members Lisa Blair, Barbara E. Stern, Karen Winicki, Amy Lowenstein and Greg Baranoski; Corbin, owner of Corbin Salon; Lisa Barnhill, associate broker at Hill & Co.; David Naumann and Dave Shatt, owners of the Bay Cafe; and Michael J. Brown, publisher at Daedalus Books.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 11, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- If war breaks out next week in the Persian Gulf, all prime-time entertainment programs might be pulled from the air for up to a week for round-the-clock news programming. That was the word yesterday from Robert Iger, president of ABC Entertainment.Mr. Iger said it is easier to go with all-news in such a situation than trying to blend entertainment and news. "What do you put in the middle of two hours of coverage of the bombing of Baghdad?" he said. "Can you go right to Roseanne after that?
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 16, 1994
After 35 years and who knows how many thousands of photographs of her face, you'd think one more picture of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis would evoke nothing more than the usual response: fascination and curiosity about the woman now known the world over as Jackie O.But something about this photograph was different. Different and disturbing.Certainly it's not the way she looks. In fact, at 64 she looks remarkably like she did at 34. And 44. And 54. The hair is still dark, the wide-set eyes steady, the jaw firm.
NEWS
April 17, 1991
Imagine, if you can, Baltimore with no electricity, no running water, no sewage disposal, no telephones or gasoline; the picture resembles an especially awful circle of hell. If you can imagine the thouands of ways residents of modern cities depend on basic infrastructures, perhaps you have some idea of the crisis confronting the cities of Iraq. Televised pictures of Kurdish refugees have justifiably stirred outrage and sympathy. But, so far at least, the West has not seen graphic evidence of the desperation of 14 million other Iraqis -- the other victims caught between Saddam Hussein's aggression and the allied coalition's determination to turn it back.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- Twelve years of "isolation and neglect" of American cities will end if the nation puts Bill Clinton in the White House, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke told assembled Democratic Party leaders and a national television audience here last night.Today, he said, American cities like Baltimore are places of "great pain," burdened by crime, by crumbling highways and water systems, and by poorly trained workers.The Bush administration did nothing in response, the mayor said. Instead, it punched holes in the ship of state and "started throwing people overboard."
NEWS
By Lani Harac and Lani Harac,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
Imagine maneuvering a vehicle through an obstacle course with a gate, a series of blocks and four structures topped with white barbell-shaped targets -- under water. Now imagine building a machine that can run the course by itself without remote controls or human assistance. Twelve teams of high school and college students have accomplished that and are competing in the fourth annual International Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Competition, which starts tomorrow at the Naval Academy. In the contest, which will take place in murky College Creek behind Hubbard Hall, students will pit their independently intelligent contraptions against each other for $20,000 in prize money and "serious bragging rights."
NEWS
April 19, 1995
SINCE their conception, cars have been a thorn in the side of the average human being. People are run down by them, choke on their fumes, and become generally annoyed.But on whose shoulders does this blame really fall? The cars themselves are not the cause, nor even the people who produce them. The real responsibility belongs to the drivers.Imagine how much more pleasant the ride into work would be every day if everyone used turn signals when they were turning or changing lanes and then turned them off when they were finished.
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