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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 2, 1994
Vote for whoever promises to take William Donald Schaefer's name off all the public buildings that William Donald Schaefer is putting it on.Surprise! Bill turns out to be the best thing a lot of Democratic candidates have going for them.Imagine a town important enough to have a cardinal in residence and not big enough for the National Football League.Whoever dismissed classical music as strictly dead white European male doesn't know about contemporary East Asia, or even about who attends American conservatories.
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NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 14, 2000
IN THE RUINS of Memorial Stadium, Mike Gibbons gestures through a raw Saturday mist toward the place that used to be the Baltimore Orioles dugout. "Come here," says Gibbons, director of the Babe Ruth Museum, leading a farewell tour of the old 33rd Street ballpark before the wrecking balls prepare to muscle up this year. We trudge through the wet gravel and weeds that have turned the old playing field into something resembling an unkempt graveyard, until we reach the tunnel by the first base dugout and step down into the darkness.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | December 26, 2005
The Orioles continue to conduct their business with heavy hearts. Calls must be made and returned, but it's never easy while in mourning. Imagine how Mike Flanagan feels, having been a teammate and close friend of Elrod Hendricks, and the man who had to make the incredibly difficult decision to relieve Elrod of his bullpen duties for fear that the daily grind, including the travel, would be too much. I can only imagine. I hope Flanny knows how much Elrod loved him. I heard the man speak about him enough times to know this is true.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1991
Imagine all the people . . . wearing John Lennon's eyeglasses.Although people have emulated the late singer's style for close to three decades by wearing round, wire-rimmed glasses, until this month none of those frames had the cachet of his signature on the inside of the right temple.Now New Jersey-based Eagle Eyewear is launching the first four models in the John Lennon collection of eye- and sunglasses for men, women and teen-agers. Priced at $70 to $80 in metal or plastic and expected in local stores by the end of this month or early March, the styles are named after popular Lennon songs or albums -- "Revolution," "Imagine," "The Walrus" and "Double Fantasy."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Imagine the barn-raising sequence from "Witness" or "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers."Now imagine it with 4,000 old tires.That was the scene yesterday in Patapsco Valley State Park as more than 200 volunteers built a playground, working from designs developed by the New Hampshire-based Learning Structures Inc.The project -- a cooperative effort by the Maryland Environmental Service, the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of the Environment --...
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | August 20, 1995
"It was an unbelievable sight. Gen. Douglas MacArthur and other dignitaries were on the battleship Missouri, which was anchored in Tokyo Bay surrounded by hundreds of U.S. and British ships with hundreds of planes flying overheard."Those are just a few of Thomas J. O'Donnell's vivid memories from Sept. 2, 1945, when he, too, was on the USS Missouri to witness the signing of the formal surrender of Japan.Last week, I chatted with O'Donnell, who worked for The Sun from 1933 to 1949 and covered the U.S. Navy during the war. He was one of three Sun correspondents on the Missouri; the others n were Bob Cochran, Evening Sun correspondent assigned to MacArthur's headquarters; and Philip Potter, former Sun city editor, whose wartime assignment was to cover China.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 11, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- If war breaks out next week in the Persian Gulf, all prime-time entertainment programs might be pulled from the air for up to a week for round-the-clock news programming. That was the word yesterday from Robert Iger, president of ABC Entertainment.Mr. Iger said it is easier to go with all-news in such a situation than trying to blend entertainment and news. "What do you put in the middle of two hours of coverage of the bombing of Baghdad?" he said. "Can you go right to Roseanne after that?
NEWS
April 17, 1991
Imagine, if you can, Baltimore with no electricity, no running water, no sewage disposal, no telephones or gasoline; the picture resembles an especially awful circle of hell. If you can imagine the thouands of ways residents of modern cities depend on basic infrastructures, perhaps you have some idea of the crisis confronting the cities of Iraq. Televised pictures of Kurdish refugees have justifiably stirred outrage and sympathy. But, so far at least, the West has not seen graphic evidence of the desperation of 14 million other Iraqis -- the other victims caught between Saddam Hussein's aggression and the allied coalition's determination to turn it back.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- Twelve years of "isolation and neglect" of American cities will end if the nation puts Bill Clinton in the White House, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke told assembled Democratic Party leaders and a national television audience here last night.Today, he said, American cities like Baltimore are places of "great pain," burdened by crime, by crumbling highways and water systems, and by poorly trained workers.The Bush administration did nothing in response, the mayor said. Instead, it punched holes in the ship of state and "started throwing people overboard."
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