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By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1990 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | November 6, 1990
The United States could lose its position of economic leadership to Europe or Asia before the end of this decade, slashing the standard of living for you and your children.If that happens, it won't be caused by the Federal deficit, trade imbalances or oil shortages. It will happen, some observers say, because we have a shortfall of people in the work force with the reading, writing and math skills required for today's jobs. And, because you and I have not the resolve to call for action to maintain the productivity of the American work force.
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NEWS
March 4, 2014
If ever there were an opportunity for our president to exercise his moral authority from the bully pulpit, the opportunity is now. In your editorial, "My brother's keeper" (March 2), you describe President Barack Obama's initiative to improve the economic and educational status of young black boys and men. Who among us could not be fully behind this goal? The elephant in the room, of course, is the fact that young black males are simply the most easily identifiable demographic segment of our culture to suffer the economic and social consequences of illiteracy and lawlessness.
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NEWS
By H. H. Morris | November 12, 1996
I SPENT AN HOUR Sunday morning sharing a condition with roughly a quarter of my fellow citizens.By forgetting my glasses when I went to church, I became a functional illiterate.The traditional Lutheran liturgy with its mostly sung responses and recitation of the creed and the Lord's Prayer posed no problem because it's familiar.Contemporary serviceBut what if it had been a contemporary service, with a spoken liturgy printed in the bulletin and changed frequently to encourage spontaneity?I'd have spontaneously opted out because my uncorrected vision put me in the position of the man or woman who's been exposed to reading without being infected by it.That is, the words weren't totally obscure.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Exposing children to books an early age, be they printed or digital, is vital to fighting the problem of illiteracy in our city ("Some parents say physical books kindle kids' reading," Jan. 7). At Baltimore Reads, we see just how important reading is every day. Since the Baltimore Reads' Book Bank was founded 20 years ago, we have distributed more than 1.5 million children's books free of charge. Reaching out to kids with books helps to break the cycle of illiteracy that plagues our city.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | May 14, 1991
ASK VOLUNTEER Virginia Walsh what the South Baltimore Learning Corporation is all about and she'll quickly answer ''to break the chain of illiteracy.''Anyone at any age, with the desire to learn, can walk into this small center at 28 East Ostend St. in South Baltimore where free instructions in reading, writing and math will be given by a one-on-one tutor.And that's not all. Basic survival skills and other necessary information will be taught, such as how to pass a driver's license exam, become an American citizen, balance a budget, count change, write a check or anything connected with daily living that a person needs to know ''or whatever that person wants to learn.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2001
THE EVENTS THAT shook the world Sept. 11 occurred three days after International Literacy Day, a worldwide celebration of literacy, which the United Nations a half-century ago declared a basic human right, along with food, health care and housing. That Saturday - how innocent we were! - we were reminded that a billion people, not quite one-sixth of the world's population, are illiterate. Of these, two-thirds are women and girls, and 100 million are children, mostly girls, who are not in school.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
Baltimore really will be "the city that reads" one day in September, when volunteers pore over novels and newspapers, menus and magazines in a 24-hour readathon intended to address the city's dismal literacy rate. At 100 locations across the city, volunteers will read aloud in one-hour shifts around the clock, starting at 6:30 a.m. Sept. 26. The event, called Need-to-Read, is meant to raise awareness about illiteracy and raise funds to address the problem. Thirty-eight percent of the city's adults are functionally illiterate, meaning they read at or below the sixth-grade level, said Marlene McLaurin, chief executive officer of Baltimore Reads, a literacy group that is organizing the event.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 9, 1997
"This is not what black English sounds like. I know people who speak black English. I know what black English sounds like."Kia Corthron still bristles when she remembers this written comment, received after a workshop production of one of her plays before a predominantly upper-middle-class white audience."I found it so offensive because I feel that when white writers play with language it's poetic, but when black writers play with language it's wrong," she says.If Corthron's reaction sounds politically charged, it is. As one of the country's most in-demand young black playwrights, she entwines politics, poetry and playwriting.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
Church helps fight illiteracy in PakistanMembers of Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church in Severna Park are raising money this week to help combat one of Pakistan's most persistent problems -- illiteracy.The money is being funneled through the Adult Basic Education Society, based in Gujranwala, to promote nonformal literacy education in a country where nearly 75 percent of the population cannot read or write."By sharing financial and human resources with the people of Pakistan, U.S. Presbyterians obey the gospel mandate to use our God-given gifts to serve one another," said the church pastor, the Rev. Terry Schoener.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Exposing children to books an early age, be they printed or digital, is vital to fighting the problem of illiteracy in our city ("Some parents say physical books kindle kids' reading," Jan. 7). At Baltimore Reads, we see just how important reading is every day. Since the Baltimore Reads' Book Bank was founded 20 years ago, we have distributed more than 1.5 million children's books free of charge. Reaching out to kids with books helps to break the cycle of illiteracy that plagues our city.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 26, 2005
Have black folks in 2005 failed Rosa Parks? Parks died Monday in Detroit. She has been called the "mother of the civil rights movement," and it has been said for years that her refusal to give up a seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man sparked the nonviolent protests that characterized the "modern" civil rights movement. That's an arguable assertion, at best. James Farmer, who for years was the leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, was involved in nonviolent protests, freedom rides and boycotts in the 1940s, years before Parks refused to yield to Alabama's idiotic segregation laws in 1955.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
WHICH INVESTMENT has the greatest risk of losing its value due to inflation? A) money market funds? B) stocks? C) putting cash in your mattress? Not too long ago, more than 5,000 American adults and high-school students were asked this and 23 other economics and personal-finance questions by a leading national pollster. The bad news: Only 28 percent of all students and 52 percent of all adults identified the riskiest investment, putting cash in your mattress. The really bad news: 60 percent of the high-school students and almost one in three in adults earned an overall "F" on the fairly simple multiple-choice quiz.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
G. Reid Lyon has dubbed illiteracy a national health problem and is leading the charge against it. Yesterday, the scientist many educators know as President Bush's "reading czar" urged teachers in Carroll County to be ever vigilant about the needs of the individual child. "We have to realize that education has to take on the same importance as medicine," said Lyon, in a speech at Winters Mill High School in Westminster. "Teachers are the best brain surgeons around, the best at developing the nervous system."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
Baltimore really will be "the city that reads" one day in September, when volunteers pore over novels and newspapers, menus and magazines in a 24-hour readathon intended to address the city's dismal literacy rate. At 100 locations across the city, volunteers will read aloud in one-hour shifts around the clock, starting at 6:30 a.m. Sept. 26. The event, called Need-to-Read, is meant to raise awareness about illiteracy and raise funds to address the problem. Thirty-eight percent of the city's adults are functionally illiterate, meaning they read at or below the sixth-grade level, said Marlene McLaurin, chief executive officer of Baltimore Reads, a literacy group that is organizing the event.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2001
THE EVENTS THAT shook the world Sept. 11 occurred three days after International Literacy Day, a worldwide celebration of literacy, which the United Nations a half-century ago declared a basic human right, along with food, health care and housing. That Saturday - how innocent we were! - we were reminded that a billion people, not quite one-sixth of the world's population, are illiterate. Of these, two-thirds are women and girls, and 100 million are children, mostly girls, who are not in school.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 2000
RESTON, Va. -- Calling literacy the key to success in the new economy, Texas Gov. George W. Bush proposed a national initiative yesterday aimed at teaching every child to read by the end of third grade. The Republican presidential contender, who wants to make education the "defining issue" of his candidacy, called for a five-year, $5 billion federal investment in teaching poor children to read. Bush termed child illiteracy "a national emergency" that must be addressed. He made his remarks at the start of a two-day mid-Atlantic swing that mingles policy, politics and $1.5 million in fund raising for his campaign.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | December 28, 1992
It started when William Kilpatrick, a professor of education at Boston College, began noticing what he would come to call signs of "moral illiteracy" among his students.They were talking about the Ten Commandments and he wanted to list them on the board. "It wasn't that individuals couldn't think of them all," he said during an interview in his office. "The whole class, working together to come up with the complete list, couldn't do it."The event reminded him of something else that had happened five or six years earlier.
NEWS
October 15, 1990
Samuel Brownell, 90a one-time Nebraska high school teacher who served as U.S. Commissioner of Education in the Eisenhower administration, died of heart failure Friday in New Haven, Conn. He was was a Yale professor and president of the New Haven State Teachers College in 1953 when President Dwight D. Eisenhower named him commissioner. With enrollments soaring as the "baby boom" generation reached school age, Mr. Brownell urged a rapid expansion of the American education system. He began programs to fight illiteracy and pushed for higher salaries and better working conditions for teachers.
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