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Illegal Signs

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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff writer | February 19, 1992
A SWAT team of sign police descended on Anne Arundel County yesterday, determined to stamp out illegal signs wherever they lurk.Richard Gauch, chief of the county's zoning enforcement program, said 125 county workers, including public works crews, secretaries, bookkeepers, filing clerks, park rangers and utility crews, will spend six hours this week and next uprooting illegal signs along highways and informing merchants that they have illegal signs on...
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The signs shout advertisements from the sidewalks: $1 crabs, day care open until midnight, cherry wood furniture and fresh starts after bankruptcy. They cover telephone poles and sprout up in medians, sometimes getting swept away by wind. And they really get under some people's skin. "It irritates me to no end," said Ed Bard, president of the Rockdale Civic & Improvement Association, who called fighting illegal signs "one of my passions. " Baltimore County code enforcement officials say they are cracking down on the common nuisance.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
They advertise, for example, for health insurance, skydiving and - oddly enough - junk removal. They're illegal signs cluttering the medians of Baltimore County roads, and Donald Gerding said he has seen one too many of them. "It's visual clutter," said Gerding, who lives in Rodgers Forge. "They distract you attention-wise driving." Now, a proposal before the County Council would allow Gerding and others to take the law into their own hands - empowering them to take down the signs themselves.
EXPLORE
February 23, 2012
It's apparent that we're once again in election season in Howard County. The signs for the school Board and Circuit Court are beginning to appear everywhere. That's part of the election process and I have no problem with it. What bothers me is when I see the illegal signs of the challenger to the sitting judges. They're on medians, rights of way, county property, etc. — places where clearly no permission was given. These signs say much about someone who wants to be a judge, but has no respect for the law. David Dagold Columbia
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Around 8 a.m., the yellow truck with the flashing lights eases off Route 32 onto the Route 108 ramp in Clarksville and stops on the roadside. Todd Hammond hops out and heads for the cluster of small paper and plastic signs fastened to wooden stakes.A green sign for Pulte Homes is plucked from the ground like a weed. Then Hammond pulls up the Dale Thompson Builders sign next to it and a nearby blue sign for Ryan Homes. Up ahead, his colleague Sam Ports grabs a cardboard yard sale poster, boldly and illegally tied to the Route 108 exit sign.
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
With a tug, slash and slam of his trunk door, community activist Harvey Schwartz wins another quick skirmish in his crusade against illegal signs tied to fences and fastened to light posts on city property.Whether they're pushing a sale on cigarettes in Baltimore or promoting a church social in Baltimore County, the signs are transforming too many streets into "carnival midways," Schwartz contends.Though city and county officials admit the signs are illegal, they say they lack the workers to enforce regulations.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff writer | January 29, 1992
Earl Johnson is a mechanic who spends up to 20 hours a month as a county reserve police officer.But even on patrol, he's seen one type of illegal activity that until now he has done little to prevent --illegal signs."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
A small army of Howard County inspectors and state and county highway workers are out this week removing illegally placed business signs that "pop up like dandelions," according to County Executive Ken Ulman. Standing before a display of more than a dozen small, cardboard signs confiscated from county roadway medians and shoulders, Ulman and Bob Francis, county director of inspections, licenses and permits, said the three-day campaign that ends tomorrow is intended as a warning. Letters will be sent to first-time offenders.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Undressed light poles. Naked medians. City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, hoping to see less on more in Baltimore, has introduced a bill to make it happen. Her "Take It Off, Take it All Off" bill would double fines for illegal signs found on public property and encourage residents to take the signs down by offering community associations a share of the fines collected. "We need an army of bounty hunters, basically, that know they're authorized to take them down," Clarke said. "It's small recompense for putting up with the litter, but at least there's hope of return."
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Businesses caught placing signs on telephone poles and along street medians in Baltimore would face not only stiffer penalties but also the wrath of community groups incensed over the practice, under a proposal approved by the City Council yesterday. The ordinance - the latest intended to increase the quality of life in city neighborhoods - doubles the penalty for posting illegal signs to $200 and directs half of the revenue collected from those fines to the neighborhood groups who organize efforts to rip them down.
EXPLORE
September 29, 2011
It's taken many years, but it looks like Harford County finally has a good plan for dealing with those illegal commercial signs that litter roadsides and median strips throughout the county: volunteer sign removal crews. Meanwhile, the state law prohibiting the signs, which amount to little more than litter, has been strengthened and the new version goes into effect this weekend. Technically, putting signs in public rights of way like median strips has never been allowed, something to which any law-abiding citizen who has applied for and received a sign permit could attest.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
A small army of Howard County inspectors and state and county highway workers are out this week removing illegally placed business signs that "pop up like dandelions," according to County Executive Ken Ulman. Standing before a display of more than a dozen small, cardboard signs confiscated from county roadway medians and shoulders, Ulman and Bob Francis, county director of inspections, licenses and permits, said the three-day campaign that ends tomorrow is intended as a warning. Letters will be sent to first-time offenders.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Cephas Richardson wanted to refinance a house along Lorraine Avenue in Charles Village. But instead of calling a bank, he called a number he saw on one of the "We Buy Houses" signs in the neighborhood. Richardson was told he could get a $100,000 refinance. All he had to do was show up at a building on Mulberry Street with $5,000 in cash. "I never went," said the vice bishop of Greater Jerusalem Church in Waverly. Richardson eventually got a $65,000 loan from a reputable lender and didn't let his house slip through his fingers.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Businesses caught placing signs on telephone poles and along street medians in Baltimore would face not only stiffer penalties but also the wrath of community groups incensed over the practice, under a proposal approved by the City Council yesterday. The ordinance - the latest intended to increase the quality of life in city neighborhoods - doubles the penalty for posting illegal signs to $200 and directs half of the revenue collected from those fines to the neighborhood groups who organize efforts to rip them down.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
They advertise, for example, for health insurance, skydiving and - oddly enough - junk removal. They're illegal signs cluttering the medians of Baltimore County roads, and Donald Gerding said he has seen one too many of them. "It's visual clutter," said Gerding, who lives in Rodgers Forge. "They distract you attention-wise driving." Now, a proposal before the County Council would allow Gerding and others to take the law into their own hands - empowering them to take down the signs themselves.
NEWS
April 1, 2006
A tanker carrying propane crashed into the Bay Bridge toll plaza late yesterday afternoon, causing backups for several miles and injuring the driver. The tanker was eastbound on U.S. 50 about 4:30 p.m. when it struck a pickup truck and another vehicle before rolling into an E-ZPass lane of the toll plaza. Cpl. Pamela Thorne, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, said five vehicles were involved. The driver of the tanker was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The signs shout advertisements from the sidewalks: $1 crabs, day care open until midnight, cherry wood furniture and fresh starts after bankruptcy. They cover telephone poles and sprout up in medians, sometimes getting swept away by wind. And they really get under some people's skin. "It irritates me to no end," said Ed Bard, president of the Rockdale Civic & Improvement Association, who called fighting illegal signs "one of my passions. " Baltimore County code enforcement officials say they are cracking down on the common nuisance.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
City workers have ticketed the campaign of Democratic mayoral candidate Andrey Bundley 79 times for raising illegal signs, but cited Mayor Martin O'Malley only twice, prompting accusations of politically motivated enforcement. Officials say the city hands out citations - which carry fines of at least $100 each - based solely on the law. They point to a large number of Bundley stickers posted improperly on public utility poles. "It doesn't matter who it is. If a candidate or somebody else has an illegal sign up, the enforcement officers will write them up and take the signs down," said Kurt Kocher, Public Works Department spokesman.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
THE ISSUE: -- Legislation proposed by Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens would severely limit those ubiquitous roadside signs on county roads advertising everything from cheap mortgage rates to open houses to landscaping businesses. The so-called "bandit signs" are an effective form of mass advertising, but many residents don't like the clutter and say the signs could cause accidents as drivers slow down to read them. Are the signs really a problem? Dangerous signs are also an eyesore Bandit signs create a hazard because, in most cases, you are driving while trying to read them, and/or you are trying to write down a telephone number to call for that service.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Sign. Sign. Everywhere a sign. Anne Arundel County - as do many other locales across America - wants to put a stop to that. Specifically, the county wants to severely limit those portable signs on sticks that tend to stack up at major intersections even when traffic doesn't. Standing 2 feet off the ground, they advertise landscaping, cheap mortgage rates and going-out-of-business sales. They're called "bandit" signs, and if legislation proposed by County Executive Janet S. Owens passes the County Council - part of a revision of dozens of zoning rules - county inspectors will be permitted to immediately uproot any signs on the county right of way and stick a removal charge to business owners.
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