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By Los Angeles Times | January 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Department of Defense has rejected a White House plan for the military to take a new leadership role in the war on illegal drugs, setting back administration efforts to give fresh impetus to a lagging program, according to senior officials.The refusal leaves stalled a proposal by the White House Office of Drug Control Policy that would have created a unified military authority to coordinate most U.S. counternarcotics operations in Central and South America.With new obstacles threatening progress made after President Bush escalated the drug fight, the Pentagon posture disappointed officials who had hoped that a military-style battle plan would help the administration wage a more effective campaign.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Anne Arundel police arrested a Laurel man Wednesday after a narcotics sting at his home turned up illegal guns and drugs. Police found two handguns, a Luger 9 mm and a Kimber .45-caliber, in a flak jacket with loaded magazines after a search of the 3500 block of Rippling Way residence. Police said Elwin Douglas Rice Jr., 32, was prohibited from possessing a firearm for a former felony conviction, according to the Maryland State Police Gun Center. A small amount of marijuana and cocaine paraphernalia were also found in the search.
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NEWS
By Charles Holmes and Charles Holmes,Cox News Service | June 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Americans spent at least $40 billion on illegal drugs last year, according to the government's first attempt in a decade to put a price on street sales."
NEWS
By John McCarthy and Tom Manger | October 8, 2013
Earlier this year, the General Assembly passed legislation to deal with the serious problem of an emerging class of drugs known as "synthetic cannabinoids. " The new law, which went into effect Oct. 1, prohibits the sale and possession of drugs intended to mimic the effects of marijuana, commonly sold under brand names such as "K-2," "Spice," "Voodoo Spice" "Scooby Snax," "Mr. Nice Guy" and "Mystery," to name just a few. Particularly troubling is that the packaging of these products often depict cartoon characters or images that are appealing to young people.
NEWS
By Anthony Tommasello | August 17, 1997
Kids once used air freshener to hide the smell of marijuana smoke. Now they're using air freshener to get high, and it's killing them.The latest victim was Thomas William McDonald, a 16-year-old Westminster High School student, who was found dead in a parked car on Aug. 5. Police said a nine-ounce can of air freshener was found between his legs, and a second, which was just about empty, was found on the passenger seat.Thomas' death illustrates the need to educate our children about the dangers of inhaling commonly used products, just as we've warned them about street drugs.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Using a police dog to sniff a car's exterior for drugs does not violate the privacy rights of a stopped motorist, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday, even if the officers had no reason to suspect the car and its driver were carrying drugs. When added to prior rulings, the Supreme Court's 6-2 decision appears to give police broad, but not unlimited, authority to use canines to sniff for drugs - or bombs - whether on roads or in schools, airports and office buildings. Although the case before the court was argued as a test of police power in the war on drugs, dogs also play an important role in the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Eric Lekus and Eric Lekus,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Adolescent drug use dropped in 1996 for the first time in five years, in a sign that the nation's anti-drug efforts are beginning to reach young people, according to a government survey released yesterday.At the same time, the report found that illicit drug use remains persistently high among college-age adults and that heroin use is rising, especially among young people.Even for teen-agers, drug use is still nearly 80 percent higher than when President Clinton took office. That bad news kept administration officials from declaring victory at a news conference yesterday announcing the results.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
A 28-year-old Severn man was arrested on multiple gun and drug charges Tuesday after paramedics responded to his home and found his 5-year-old son had ingested methadone, according to Anne Arundel County Police. Paul Kristopher Brooks, of the 1200 block of Reece Road, could also face child neglect charges, and charges are also pending against an additional, unidentified suspect, police said. Emergency personnel first responded to Brooks' home about 8:10 p.m. Tuesday after a 911 caller reported the boy was not breathing after accidentally ingesting the prescription narcotic and powerful liquid pain killer, police said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
The state proposed strict new policies yesterday to prevent transit workers with drug problems from returning to the controls of trains and buses - even as investigators said preliminary tests show no evidence of illegal drugs behind Tuesday's crash of a light rail train at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The Mass Transit Administration said, however, that four of its 2,400 workers in "safety-sensitive" positions - including drivers - are still on the job after twice testing positive for drugs.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
Baltimore police say that an apparent decline in the supply of illegal drugs, which they believe is linked to a recent spate of killings and shootings, could be the beginning of a broader trend that might lead to more violence. Detectives have begun closely tracking street sales and the purity of drugs they seize to discern clues about shifting alliances between street dealers and suppliers, said Maj. Anthony G. Cannavale, who leads the department's narcotics unit. By increasing surveillance, police officials hope to prevent more violence.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | July 3, 2013
Addressing a Harford County crowd interested in learning the latest social threats posed by chemical abuse, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent Chip Cooke pointed out that synthetic drugs with names like "spice" and "bath salts," which had been outlawed, are back on the market. By changing the chemical makeup of the substances by what Cooke characterized as "one little molecule," the definitions in the prohibition against selling would have to be changed to account for the change in chemical formula.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
Lawmakers in Maryland this year shied away from legalizing the medical use of marijuana by certain very ill patients under carefully controlled clinical conditions. Voters elsewhere, it seems, are not so cautious. On Tuesday, Colorado and Washington passed ballot initiatives legalizing the possession and sale or marijuana for purely recreational use - no prescription required - making them the first states in the country to do so. (A similar initiative in Oregon was narrowly rejected, but voters in Massachusetts approved a law allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for medicinal purposes.)
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore helped lead an operation that this week seized and shut down nearly 700 U.S.-based websites linked to the sale of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs as part of an international effort to upend the global online drug trade. The local operation, known as Bitter Pill, was part of an international initiative led by Interpol that spanned 100 countries and confiscated 3.7 million doses of counterfeit medications worth an estimated $10.5 million, according to federal officials.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
A 28-year-old Severn man was arrested on multiple gun and drug charges Tuesday after paramedics responded to his home and found his 5-year-old son had ingested methadone, according to Anne Arundel County Police. Paul Kristopher Brooks, of the 1200 block of Reece Road, could also face child neglect charges, and charges are also pending against an additional, unidentified suspect, police said. Emergency personnel first responded to Brooks' home about 8:10 p.m. Tuesday after a 911 caller reported the boy was not breathing after accidentally ingesting the prescription narcotic and powerful liquid pain killer, police said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Maryland is slated to receive $1.8 million for its part in a national settlement with Illinois-based Abbott Laboratories over allegations of illegal drug marketing, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said Monday. Abbott will pay $100 million to 44 states and Washington, where officials had claimed the company marketed Depakote for uses other than those approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It's considered safe and effective for treating seizure disorders, mania associated with bipolar disorder and migraines.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As the election-year debate over illegal immigration heats up, Maryland National Guard members are preparing to deploy to Texas to help monitor the U.S.-Mexican border. Two crews from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade will take high-tech helicopters to the southern tip of Texas in June to provide aerial surveillance to U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents on the ground, Guard officials said Wednesday. They will watch for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers — "basically, people crossing the border without authorization," said Lt. Col. Michael Whelan, commander of the 1-224th Aviation Security and Support Battalion.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
Lawmakers in Maryland this year shied away from legalizing the medical use of marijuana by certain very ill patients under carefully controlled clinical conditions. Voters elsewhere, it seems, are not so cautious. On Tuesday, Colorado and Washington passed ballot initiatives legalizing the possession and sale or marijuana for purely recreational use - no prescription required - making them the first states in the country to do so. (A similar initiative in Oregon was narrowly rejected, but voters in Massachusetts approved a law allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for medicinal purposes.)
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
The apartments called Tubman House on Towson Way are part of a new dorm complex for freshmen and sophomores at Towson University, and someone recently sent an occupant there 65 grams of marijuana. A townhouse on Randallstown's Kenny Green Court is a suburban cookie-cutter home on a cul-de-sac, and someone from West Hollywood, Calif., recently mailed 1,450 grams of marijuana to that address. Federal agents with the U.S. postal inspector's office intercepted both packages, according to search warrant applications — and subsequent lists of what the searches revealed — unsealed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore this week.
NEWS
By Kevin A. Sabet | October 9, 2011
Prohibition - America's notoriously "failed social experiment" to rid the country of alcohol - took center stage this past week as PBS broadcast Ken Burns' highly acclaimed series on the subject. And already, it has been seized on by drug-legalization advocates who say it proves that drug prohibition should be abandoned. But a closer look at what resulted from alcohol prohibition and its relevance to today's anti-drug effort reveals a far more nuanced picture than the legalization lobby might like to admit.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
Regarding your editorial "Downsizing Md.'s prisons" (Aug. 14), I certainly agree that Maryland should not need the prisons that it has, and I shouldn't have to pay the tremendous cost of providing free room, board, medical care, entertainment, etc. to people who are not fit to mingle with the law-abiding populace. The answer, which I realize is counter to the preaching of The Sun's editors and columnists, is to rid the world of those who have the mental make-up to kill others in the commission of a crime.
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