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Icebreakers

NEWS
By Ilan Berman | September 24, 2003
WHEN PRESIDENT BUSH meets with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin at Camp David later this week, the agenda for their summit will include an array of high-profile issues, from bilateral economic cooperation to Russian involvement in postwar Iraq. But one topic that almost certainly won't be on the table is the issue of Russian nuclear security. This is undoubtedly a pity, because Russia's crumbling nuclear infrastructure is a grave - and growing - threat to global security. It wasn't always so. Throughout the Cold War, the Kremlin kept an iron grip on the Soviet nuclear arsenal through an array of elaborate procedures - from stringent border screenings to multiple, decentralized stockpiles - designed to ensure the safety of its nuclear deterrent.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1998
Even before she could read, Rebecca H. Harman would stare at pictures of Africa and vow to see the wild animals and lush vegetation for herself.It took nearly 60 years, but Harman went to Kenya and back again -- three times since 1981. From her home in New Windsor, she also has traveled to Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Swaziland and Tanzania, all nations that had not been born when Becky Harman was growing up on a farm in Frederick County.At 80, Harman has just earned a berth in the Travelers Century Club, whose 1,200 members have visited 100 countries.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 14, 1991
SIMON SAYS:I don't care what anyone says, we didn't have weather like this before they launched the Hubble Space Telescope.*A good vacuum cleaner should last you a lifetime. (If you don't live too long.)*Should we tell our children that if they, too, "experiment" with illegal drugs, they may grow up to be nominated to the Supreme Court?*Even with two new cities getting National League franchises, Baltimore still remains the only city in North America to have major league baseball and no other major league teams.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 31, 1997
MOSCOW -- Money doesn't talk here, it shouts. And when it does, everyone listens. Today, nearly everything has a price tag, from the famous red-velvet seats of the Bolshoi Theater to a certificate from the mayor of Moscow testifying to your &r exemplary character.And if you feel like it, why not buy up some advertising on the Mir space station and send your own message from outer space?Today's New Russian -- as the new rich are called -- will buy everything, no matter how expensive. They have made their fortunes legally and illegally and somewhere in between since a free market economy replaced communism.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | November 19, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush has made a mistake by threatening to veto additional congressional spending bills on homeland security. Although some proposed appropriations may be wasteful, there still are many unmet needs for protecting American citizens and territory. A prominent case in point is the role of the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard is the country's principal defense against illicit shipping. Working in tandem with Customs and the Immigration and Naturalization Service, it would be critical for preventing terrorists from bringing explosives or weapons of mass destruction onto American soil.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
Adm. John William Kime, retired commandant of the Coast Guard and former captain of the Port of Baltimore who helped to expand the federal government's role in preventing and responding to oil spills, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 72. Admiral Kime was born in Greensboro, N.C., and moved to Baltimore when he was 10. Raised in Highlandtown near Patterson Park, where he dreamed of rowing across the Chesapeake Bay, he graduated from City College in 1951.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Philadelphia Inquirer | January 16, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Now Charles Barkley has become a victim of his own reputation.Now the whackos and the brave-on-beer midnight cowboys, the prowlers and the predators, the mischief-makers and the just plain mean -- they all want to try him. They all want a piece of him.Now Charles Barkley has come to represent the lottery in reverse -- get him to hit you and then sue.Now Charles Barkley needs do nothing more than walk into a bar and some quick-draw guy wants...
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | February 8, 1994
I don't think the Bay Bridge will be there long. Just let the bay ice up the way it used to and that bridge will be mowed down like a blade of grass.-- Capt. James Corkin, commenting on the opening of the BayBridge, 1952A FEW weeks back, the week hell seemed to freeze over, some of us were fascinated to watch the Inner Harbor become a sheet of ice before our very eyes. "I've never seen the likes," said one colleague.But old-timers have seen the likes and much more.One of those old-timers is John Hess.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2004
For nearly 70 years, Edgar Reese Lewis rode out Chesapeake Bay storms, rescued stranded mariners, delivered oysters, observed ecological changes in the world's largest estuary, swapped sea stories over drinks with actor Robert Mitchum and ended his career breaking ice and setting buoys as captain of the J.C. Widener. Lewis, whose colorful life was recalled yesterday at a memorial service in Hurlock, died July 1 at his home in Cambridge. He was 85. "Uncle Edgar was from the true Chesapeake Bay era. He was a really humble no-b.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
QUEENSTOWN -- For a pair of 2-year-olds who seem to regard chasing each other's tail as a life's calling, Prudence and Perry can snap to attention with remarkable speed.That's because Prudence, a black Labrador retriever, and Perry, a German shepherd, have been trained to set aside their natural insouciance at the drop of a command from either Cindy Rochen or her husband, Tim Bunge.For Mr. Bunge and Ms. Rochen, who are both partially disabled, the quick obedience of their dogs can mean the difference between standing and falling.
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