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Icebreakers

NEWS
May 6, 1992
Chernobyl introduced the world to the lax safety procedures in nuclear plants of the now-defunct Soviet Union, but the Barents Sea was where the system's roughest edges were hidden. That is the import of the revelations by a Russian nuclear engineer, Andrei Zolotkov, who says he participated in dumping radioactive reactor wastes off Novaya Zemlya during the 1970s.Later, as a member of the old Soviet parliament, Mr. Zolotkov must have had pangs of conscience as he began gathering the evidence for the reports that he recently released to Western environmental groups.
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SPORTS
November 17, 1998
BaseballAngels: Released P Jeff Juden and P Rich Robertson.Baseball Hall of Fame: Announced the resignation of president and CEO Donald Marr Jr., effective at the end of the year.CollegeCatholic: LB Justin Flint (Loyola High) was named to the GTE Academic All-America District II football team.Johns Hopkins: Harrison Bernstein, David Perna and Greg Gorla were named to the All-Centennial Conference football first team; Adam Gentile, Mitch Pearlman, Chris Baugh, Justin Bellochio and Justin Kamm to the second team.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2000
WHEN THE newly commissioned Coast Guard cutter Healy made its way up the Chesapeake from Norfolk to Baltimore last week, Crofton residents Gregory and Sharon Johnson were aboard -- and for him, in particular, the trip held special pride. Gregory Johnson had helped give birth to the Healy. A Coast Guard captain, Johnson spent the past five years as program manager in charge of building the 420-foot vessel, designed for double duty as an icebreaker and a floating science lab that will enable researchers to work in Arctic settings.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 1996
Is it a problem when an 8-year-old prefers adult company to playing with kids her own age? A little girl I know hangs around the adults at gatherings while the kids are playing..` How can we get her to go play?Debbie ZaleskyFarmington, Minn.Whether this is a problem is a matter of degree. A child who occasionally hovers in the background is probably just curious about the mysterious world of adults. But when a child constantly chooses adult company, that's most likely a signal that she needs help making friends.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2006
The first detailed analysis of a climatic and biological record from the seabed near the North Pole indicates that 55 million years ago the Arctic Ocean was far warmer than scientists imagined - a Floridian year-round average of 74 degrees Fahrenheit. The findings, published today in the journal Nature, fill in a blank spot in scientists' understanding of climate history. And they suggest that scientists have greatly underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm the Arctic. Previous computer simulations, without the benefit of seabed sampling, did not suggest an ancient Arctic that was nearly so warm, the authors said.
SPORTS
November 11, 1998
BaseballAngels: Named Carney Lansford manager of Triple-A Edmonton.Expos: Named Rick Sweet minor-league field coordinator and signed him to a two-year contract.Giants: Acquired P Alan Embree from the Arizona Diamondbacks for minor-league OF Dante Powell.Pirates: Purchased the contract of OF Brian Ralph from Northern League Duluth-Superior.Reds: Released OF Tony Tarasco and P Rick Krivda, both former Orioles. Outrighted P Eddie Priest to Triple-A Indianapolis.Yankees: Re-signed 3B Scott Brosius to a three-year contract.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
UPPER MARLBORO - The National Rookie League might be better than you think. True, the uniforms look like they were borrowed from high school physical education classes, and yes, there probably were too many no-pass, one-shot possessions in the first quarter. But the performance of the players, specifically those of the Baltimore Blaze, which beat the Washington Justice, 104-101, in its opener, improved during the game, giving the better-than-expected crowd of about 1,000 at Show Place Arena the bargain that one expects from minor-league sports.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
With each passing day, the creeks and rivers of the Chesapeake Bay are filling with windowpanes of ice, beautiful to look at but capable of slicing through the hull of a boat with deadly precision. Several weeks of teeth-chattering cold that triggered a massive fish kill, stranded duck hunters on an ice-choked island off Baltimore County and contributed to Maryland's first boating fatality also have put the state's ice-breaking fleet on standby to begin the great push back. After a fast start to the ice-breaking season in December, sheets of frozen water are again starting to knit together in tributary shallows.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
Adm. John William Kime, retired commandant of the Coast Guard and former captain of the Port of Baltimore who helped to expand the federal government's role in preventing and responding to oil spills, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 72. Admiral Kime was born in Greensboro, N.C., and moved to Baltimore when he was 10. Raised in Highlandtown near Patterson Park, where he dreamed of rowing across the Chesapeake Bay, he graduated from City College in 1951.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | February 1, 1998
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Capt. Ralph Carpino nosed the stubby bow of the tugboat along the port side of the cargo ship.The tug was nothing pretty to look at, its thick bumper of old tires forming a kind of waterline goatee, but the contact it made with the ship was as soft as a mother's hand brushing a child's cheek.The Hudson River was slate gray and as placid as a mountain pond. The noontime tide was slack, the day windless. A few granular snowflakes fell like salt from a shaker.At 156 tons, the 85-foot tug Frances Turecamo was a mouse wrestling an elephant, with the ship M/V Unicondor measuring 550 feet and weighing 17,500 tons.
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