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Ibuprofen

NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
I've heard that Tylenol doesn't do anything to reduce inflammation, but it's easier on my stomach than ibuprofen. With my overuse injuries, does it make sense to take it? For acute overuse injuries, ibuprofen is best because it helps reduce inflammation, according to Dr. Howard Hauptman, a Towson-area rheumatologist. Common acute injuries include bursitis of the shoulder, tennis or golfer's elbow and a strain or sprain of the ankle or knee. For these, acetaminophen will relieve pain but won't reduce inflammation like ibuprofen will.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 17, 2002
Q. My daughter, a sophomore in college, has genital herpes. She is totally shattered because she now has an incurable disease. The student health service gave her a seven-day prescription for acyclovir. She was told she could get a refill when the infection comes back. Is there anything she can do to prevent an outbreak? A. Genital herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. Surveys suggest that approximately 20 percent of all Americans are infected. Many might not even realize they carry the virus.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 23, 2001
Q. I read in the newspaper that drugs like ibuprofen can prevent Alzheimer's disease. But the article said not to take drugs like Advil, Aleve or Motrin for this purpose until more research has been done. I can't afford to wait five or 10 years while the scientists do more studies. My grandmother was in a nursing home with Alzheimer's disease for decades, and my father began to develop memory problems in his early 60s. I am 48, and I would do anything to avoid ending up not being able to take care of myself.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
On a Monday morning, Phillip Marsiglia sits in a small, cramped alcove, just out of sight of the main counter at South Baltimore Pharmacy, surrounded by shelves stuffed with syringes and bandages. To his left is a pile of prescriptions. He furiously punches the keys on a computer, calling up patients' records and submitting prescriptions to pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs). When the computer shows payment approved, he shifts the prescription to a pile to his right, on top of a stack of baby formula boxes.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 28, 2001
Q.Thirty years ago when my daughter was making her first Holy Communion, I had a house full of guests. My head was splitting, and nothing helped. My sister-in-law told me to try a couple aspirins with a cup of coffee. I had tried everything else, so I took her advice. A few hours later she asked me how my headache was, and I realized the pain was gone. That's how I learned to combine aspirin and caffeine. A.Caffeine has been shown to boost pain relief from either aspirin or ibuprofen.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 1999
Q.When I went through menopause six years ago, my doctor prescribed Premarin and Provera for hot flashes. Three years ago, he switched me to Prempro. I wondered whether I needed to continue on hormone replacement therapy, but he was very insistent that hormones would be beneficial for my bones and my heart. Three months ago, a routine mammogram showed that I had early stages of breast cancer. Since then, my life has been turned upside down. I've had surgery and am taking chemotherapy.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 1999
Q. I have a problem that my doctor and neurologist can't help me with. I am hoping you can give me a hint as to what to do.Whenever I strain in heavy lifting or in hanky-panky (don't laugh), I get severe, pounding headaches lasting five to 15 minutes. I am incapacitated by them. My neurologist says they are "benign sex headaches" caused by my blood pressure going high, but I'm on Accupril for hypertension. Do you have any ideas?A. Two kinds of headache are associated with sexual activity and exertion.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | September 30, 1997
I work in a greenhouse and have to do a lot of lifting and digging. Ibuprofen eases the aches and pains pretty well, but I find I am taking the maximum dose almost every day. Sometimes I need another two by bedtime even though the label says not to go over six pills. Is there any harm in taking the extra dose?You may be asking for trouble. Ibuprofen, like other NSAIDs -- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -- can be very irritating to the stomach. It is estimated that 76,000 people are hospitalized each year because of bad reactions to NSAIDs.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
Painkillers such as ibuprofen that are widely used for headaches and arthritis may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, a degenerative, fatal disorder for which there is little treatment.The link has been reported before, but a study published in today's issue of the journal Neurology is the first to analyze a large number of patients over a long period of time. The study was conducted by researchers from the Johns Hopkins University and the National Institute on Aging.They found that people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for as little as two years had half the risk of Alzheimer's disease as those not taking the drugs.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 1996
I've read that a vitamin called folic acid may protect people from heart disease. My parents both have heart problems, so I am being very careful with my diet. I have cut out fat from meat, milk, butter, cheese and eggs. I don't even eat margarine. Can you tell me how much folic acid I should take?Research has focused on people's diets. Those who consumed the most folic acid in foods such as spinach, split peas, lentils, broccoli or peanuts were less likely to suffer heart attacks.Until a study is done with folic acid supplements, we cannot say if they will be as good.
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