Advertisement
HomeCollectionsIacocca
IN THE NEWS

Iacocca

BUSINESS
December 10, 1992
Iacocca may fly to TWA's rescueLee A. Iacocca, who helped Chrysler Corp. get back on its feet when it reached the brink of financial ruin, is being asked to do something similar for Trans World Airlines, which is in bankruptcy.Since August, the 68-year-old Mr. Iacocca, who plans to retire from Chrysler at month's end, has been talking with Brian Freeman, an investment banker whom he got to know during the days of Chrysler's rescue through federal loan guarantees, about assuming the chairmanship of TWA. Mr. Iacocca met yesterday with leaders of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers in an effort on his part to see if he wants the job.Ford to weigh non-cash chargeFord Motor Co.'s board of directors is expected to decide today whether to book a non-cash charge of $5 billion to $9 billion for retiree health care benefit accounting changes in the fourth quarter.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Lee A. Iacocca -- the tough-talking chairman of Chrysler Corp. -- got right to the point during his commencement address at the Johns Hopkins University yesterday, telling graduates they were buried in a "dung heap" of national debt and were going to have a hard time finding a job, thanks in part to unfair Japanese trade practices.As an example of the difficult road ahead, Mr. Iacocca said Chrysler, the 11th largest company in the nation, "will hire a grand total of 100 college graduates this year.
BUSINESS
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1992
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- Chrysler Corp. Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, his voice cracking with emotion, bid goodbye to shareholders yesterday at what is expected to be the last annual meeting he will preside over as the company's chief executive."
BUSINESS
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1992
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- Chrysler Corp. Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, his voice cracking with emotion, bade goodbye to shareholders yesterday at what is expected to be the last annual meeting he will preside over as the company's chief executive."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 25, 1992
What Clinton took from the Arkansas poultry king was chicken feed.Ross Perot for Veep on the Lee Iacocca ticket!George found the way to balance the budget some day: Make the states pay for everything.The good news is that Albania overthrew the Communists. The bad news is Albania.
BUSINESS
By Joann Muller and Joann Muller,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 17, 1992
DETROIT -- Robert Eaton is the first to admit he's no Lee Iacocca."First of all, I'm a lousy writer," said Mr. Eaton, 52, who was chosen to succeed the charismatic chairman of Chrysler Corp., author of two best-selling books."Lee's Lee and I'm me and we're a little bit different," said Mr. Eaton, who said he doesn't crave -- and doubts he'll ever achieve -- Mr. Iacocca's kind of national prominence.Nor is he likely to don a trench coat to star in Chryslertelevision commercials."I doubt if I would have the appeal that Lee has in commercials," Mr. Eaton joked during his first news conference since being named Chrysler's vice chairman and chief operating officer yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1992
DETROIT -- Chrysler Corp., once again turning outside the corporate hierarchy for leadership in crisis, announced yesterday that it has chosen General Motors executive Robert J. Eaton to replace Lee A. Iacocca as chairman and chief executive officer at the end of the year.Mr. Eaton, 52, will join Mr. Iacocca in a newly formed office of the chief executive. Mr. Iacocca will be 68 in October and plans to remain a Chrysler director and chairman of the board's executive committee.Robert A. Lutz, Chrysler's president, said he would remain as president, though he was disappointed that he did not get the top job. He had been Chrysler's chief operating officer, but that title will immediately go to Mr. Eaton, who will also be vice chairman until Mr. Iacocca steps down.
BUSINESS
By Doron P. Levin and Doron P. Levin,New York Times News Service | March 16, 1992
DETROIT -- Yielding to the wishes of Lee A. Iacocca, the directors of Chrysler Corp. have agreed to name a General Motors executive to succeed Mr. Iacocca as chief executive, several people with knowledge of the board's deliberations said last night.After two days of meetings in New York, the board's 10 outside directors settled on Mr. Iacocca's candidate, Robert J. Eaton, who currently heads GM's highly profitable European operations.Chrysler spokesmen and executives declined to comment yesterday on what was decided, and the company scheduled C news conference for this morning at its headquarters in Highland Park, Mich.
BUSINESS
By Donald Woutat and Donald Woutat,Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1992
DETROIT -- It seemed inevitable that Lee A. Iacocca would not leave Chrysler Corp. in an orderly fashion, and now evidence of a boardroom quarrel over who will succeed him as chief executive is spilling awkwardly into the open.Members of Chrysler's board are reportedly to meet in New York this weekend in hopes of hastening the selection of a successor. The 68-year-old Mr. Iacocca has said that he will retire as chief executive at the end of this year.Speculation has centered on various combinations of the three top posts at the company: chairman, chief executive and president.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1992
George Bush's upset tummy may have had nothing to do with the flu. It may have been caused by spending all those hours with Lee Iacocca.If you wanted concessions from the Japanese, would you have brought Iacocca to Japan with you?It's like bringing David Duke to Nigeria. Or Louis Farrakhan to Israel.Iacocca, the chairman of Chrysler, is one of America's leading Japan-bashers. But at least he's got a good reason: Japan makes better cars than he does.And this drives him wild. Which is why, soon after getting back from Japan, Iacocca made yet another rude speech about the Japanese.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.