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SPORTS
By Jeff Duncan and Jeff Duncan,Special to The Sun | March 17, 1995
RUSTON, La. -- Loyola ran out of rallies and was rudely run out of the women's NCAA tournament by Oklahoma last night.The Greyhounds, masters of the comeback in their previous three games, fell behind early and failed to threaten in a 90-55 loss in the East Regional.Patty Stoffey ended her stellar collegiate career with a team-high 29 points and eight rebounds.Neither was nearly enough against a taller, deeper and more talented Oklahoma team. All 13 Sooners played and scored, led by LaNae Jones' career-high 20 points.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun movie critic | November 24, 2006
Catherine Hardwicke has made a career of depicting teenagers in extraordinary situations, first with Thirteen (2003), about a girl who falls victim to a perfect storm of adolescent rebellion, then with Lords of Dogtown (2005), which lionized the young men and women in the 1970s who turned skateboarding into an extreme sport. But her new film trumps both of those earlier efforts. The Nativity Story, opening Dec. 1, tells the story of Jesus' birth by focusing on Mary, the young Nazarene girl chosen by God to bear his son. Two thousand years later, no teen has ever found herself in a comparable position, nor one for which she was as unprepared.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | July 9, 2000
YOU COULD ASK senior golf professional Dana Quigley if you don't think payback is sweet. A club pro who hit the New England tournament circuit for years, Mr. Quigley's game held up long enough to bring him a bit of celebrity and some handsome paychecks. A number of pros you probably never heard of have been blessed by the circuit created to give Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and other name players a place to compete and to make money for local charities and local economies. The good fortune of Mr. Quigley, who is competing this weekend at Hobbit's Glen in Columbia, strikes me as another reason to believe the golfing gods are not always so stern and unforgiving.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 16, 1992
New York - - It's the tail end of a killer day and Hillary Clinton settles into the sofa on the 14th floor of the Intercontinental looking remarkably alert and limp free, drinking spring water straight out of a plastic bottle.The day broke with a sheaf of headlines declaring that the campaign was manufacturing a ''gentler, kinder'' Hillary. Family Circle featured a political bake-off between Hillary's and Barbara's chocolate chip cookie recipes.More than one story talked about the ''two sides'' of the candidate's wife: heads up she's a lawyer, heads down she's a wife.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 13, 1994
If you've spent any time in the past few months listening to rock radio or watching MTV, odds are you're familiar with the refrain. "Soy un perdidor," sings a ragged male voice as a bottle-neck guitar whines over a funky drum loop. "I'm a loser baby/So why don't you kill me?"It's called "Loser," and its success has surprised no one more than the man who sings it."I thought that maybe the song would do well," says Beck, a 23-year-old former street musician. "We took so long in getting the song out that I thought its time had probably passed.
SPORTS
By Will McDonough and Will McDonough,Boston Globe | January 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- Richie Petitbon said he thought his defense was special, but kept it to himself until their mission was completed last night."I thought we had a very good defense, but I didn't want to say much about it until this thing [season] was finished. When we shut out Buffalo in the first half, under some difficult circumstances, that was great defense. Buffalo was the best offensive team we had played against this year, and not letting them score in the first half is something."Petitbon is Washington's defensive coordinator and generally regarded as one of the best in the game.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
David Towns remembers wanting to play for a recreation soccer team his father coached, but league officials would not permit it. Towns was 4 years old at the time, tagging along after an older brother and an older sister.Over the years, his development has been steady, and now, as a Westminster junior, he is in his second season as a starter in the midfield."It's up to me to distribute the ball, because it goes through me and to the outside. I know the coach wants me to take charge, take control of the situation," said Towns, a slender 6-footer.
NEWS
By Dick George | April 15, 1994
IT'S been a year since my near-death computer experience. In that time I've grown as a human being. Sunsets are more beautiful. I notice stars. I'm nicer to dogs.Like many Americans, I use a computer software program to do my income taxes. Last April 14 around 11 p.m. I was finally finished after weeks of work. I felt a little relieved.I had to send in some money, but at least it was done. All I had to do was print it out.Then I noticed a "Final Review" command. The program would check the return for inconsistencies and offer tax-saving ideas.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
One thought popped into Donny Brady's head as he was about to be introduced to the Memorial Stadium crowd before yesterday's game against the New Orleans Saints: It finally happened.Thirteen months after being released by the Cleveland Browns, and 11 months after being waived out of the Canadian Football League, Brady stood on the threshold of his first start in the NFL. He would be the Ravens' right cornerback, having unseated third-year veteran Issac Booth. This would be his opportunity.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 6, 1992
At 46, actor Ernie Hudson has been around for a while. He appeared in both the ''Ghostbusters'' movies, but they didn't do his career much good.Now Hudson is appearing in the new film ''The Hand That Rocks the Cradle,'' which opens here Friday. Rebecca de Mornay plays a deranged young woman who becomes a nanny for a family she intends to destroy.Standing in her way is Solomon, a handyman, played by Hudson, who knows what the nanny is up to long before the people who have hired her wise up.The man Hudson plays is slightly retarded.
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