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NEWS
May 24, 2012
The irony of the current BGE Smart Meter controversy is delicious: Here's a publicly traded company that wants to use technology to improve its business, but conservative extremists are pleading with the government they hate so much to intercede ("Smart meters are dangerous," March 26). "Smaller government, less regulation!" they demand - except when they deem the regulation good and just. Actually, I can see their point. If we allow BGE to install Smart Meters, our privacy will be compromised, right?
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NEWS
April 29, 2014
I was disturbed on multiple levels after reading Dan Rodricks ' recent article, "Two years after Maryland court ruling, pit bulls on attack" (April 26). Not only does Mr. Rodricks feed into anti-pit bull hysteria for the sake of sensationalizing a hot-button issue, but his piece can hardly be called journalism due to its questionable methodology. Mr. Rodricks' "research" for this piece is based upon a "game" that he calls "Pit Bull Google. " He writes, "Anyone with access to the Internet can do it. " Apparently, anyone with access to the Internet can also be a journalist!
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NEWS
June 22, 2010
Being a proud Baltimore native living in Los Angeles these past 15 years, I was surprised, outraged and down right flabbergasted by all the ridiculous hyperbole surrounding the new 2 cent bottle tax. I laughed aloud when I read that Councilwoman Helen Holton called it "a dark day for Baltimore" and Councilman Nicholas D'Adamo said he was "ashamed" to be on the council. Grow up, children! These comments show just how juvenile and petty elected officials can be. I particularly enjoyed a comment in The Sun earlier in the week where a councilman said that the tax (then 4 cents)
NEWS
January 13, 2014
It's unfortunate that hundreds of guns purchased in the weeks before Maryland's stricter firearms regulations went into effect last year ended up in the hands of people who should never have been allowed to own them. Most of the weapons have since been recovered, but one was sold to a man later accused of using it in a carjacking in Prince George's County, and others were purchased by people with criminal records, a history of mental illness or other disqualifying factors. Yet the fault for those failures doesn't lie with the law or with state police efforts to complete thousands of background checks on gun license applicants in a timely fashion.
NEWS
March 25, 2010
In response to the hysterical letter in the March 24 Sun entitled "Democrats produce a new day that will live in infamy," with all the histrionic rightwing clichés about "trampling on the Constitution," etc., I just have to question a statement like, "let's not forget President Obama wants [gas prices] at $4 to $6 so he can control your behavior through the price of economic pain." Where does the writer even come up with stuff like that? From the same misinformed place the birthers come up with their lunatic claims, the same place from which the rumors about President Obama being a Muslim come?
NEWS
February 7, 1992
It may well be that the people who lashed out at a meeting at the Rodgers Forge Elementary School Wednesday are a small and unrepresentative group. We hope so. At issue is a house in the 7100 block of York Road, purchased last week by the Sheppard Pratt Health System, which the facility intends to use as an alternative living unit.Three outpatients from Sheppard Pratt, located about a mile away from the property, would call the three-bedroom residence home for a year while they complete their recovery from such illnesses as eating disorders, severe depression and schizophrenia.
NEWS
July 24, 1991
Hysteria does not make for good medical policies. An unfortunate example of the hysteria surrounding the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, surfacing just as many in Congress prepare to face elections, is the Senate's recent passage of two bills concerning health workers with AIDS.The first, backed by the leaders of both parties, would direct the states to require health professionals doing "invasive" procedures to submit to tests for human immunodeficiency virus infection. That bill, crafted with a close eye on the new guidelines published by the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control, also requires review by a panel of experts before an infected person can perform dental extractions, bone or abdominal surgery, obstetric and gynecological procedures, heart and blood-vessel catheterization or other procedures.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 12, 2002
ARLINGTON, Va. -- During the 2000 presidential campaign, candidate George W. Bush said he was skeptical about Vice President Al Gore's fundamentalist doctrine on the threat of global warming. Mr. Bush said there was disagreement among scientists and we shouldn't be stampeded into a response that would cost a lot of money and require Americans to substantially alter their way of life. Now, in an unannounced transmission of a climate report to the United Nations, the Environmental Protection Agency accepts the doctrine that the Earth is getting warmer and, in a critical concession, partly blames human activity for the trend.
BUSINESS
By David Zeiler and David Zeiler,Sun Columnist | June 28, 2007
As this week wears on, the iPhone hysteria will only get worse. By tomorrow at 6 p.m. when The Most Hyped Device of All Time goes on sale, it has been estimated that the average U.S. citizen will have heard or read about the iPhone 10,472 times. OK, I just made that up. But I can't be too far off, can I? Evidence of the deepening iPhone madness continues to accumulate. A few of my favorite examples from recent days: The Vicarious Music Web site on Monday spotted two guys who appeared to be the first in line to buy an iPhone from the Apple Store in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Tomas Alex Tizon and Tomas Alex Tizon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2004
SPOKANE, Wash. - There's no question Ken Olsen made the stuff. He brought some castor beans to his work cubicle, put them through a coffee grinder and mixed in a common solvent. He then poured the concoction through a paper filter. Within minutes, Olsen, a respected software engineer for a high-tech company and former Scoutmaster, had in his possession a few drops of ricin, one of the world's most lethal toxins. From the start, Olsen, who had no record of violence, said he never intended harm.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
About two months ago, I was driving home from Frederick at about 2 a.m., and I passed a specter on the side of the road. At least I thought so, because it was hard for me to believe that I had seen what I thought I saw. I pulled over to the side of the road and backed up slowly and found a dog - an emaciated, scared, hurt, bleeding dog on the side of the road picking through a white trash bag. I approached her carefully, but she just collapsed when...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: FARRAGO Ever look at a journalist's desk? Old newspapers, yellowing printouts, notes scribbled on odd scraps of paper or half-used journalist's notebooks, opened and unopened mail, miscellaneous writing implements and office supplies, old food and beverage containers, unconsumed food, and more.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
The irony of the current BGE Smart Meter controversy is delicious: Here's a publicly traded company that wants to use technology to improve its business, but conservative extremists are pleading with the government they hate so much to intercede ("Smart meters are dangerous," March 26). "Smaller government, less regulation!" they demand - except when they deem the regulation good and just. Actually, I can see their point. If we allow BGE to install Smart Meters, our privacy will be compromised, right?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2011
Several people were arrested at malls across Maryland as police broke up crowds of hundreds lined up to buy Nike Air Jordan Concords, part of a nationwide frenzy over the new sneakers that prompted a number of disturbances. Mobs broke down store doors in suburban Atlanta, shots were fired in Richmond, Calif., and police pepper-sprayed a crowd in Seattle. The incidents recalled violence in the 1990s when the high cost of the shoes combined with their popularity led to well-publicized violence, including a slaying of a Meade High School teen in Anne Arundel County that was the focal point of a Sports Illustrated cover story.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
I absolutely refuse to believe that the anti-immigrant crowd makes any distinction between legal and illegal immigrants. How can they tell the difference? Employers certainly make no such distinctions, because otherwise it's hard to see why they wouldn't certify all their fruit and vegetables as picked by U.S. citizens, if only in the interest in their bottom lines. The truth is, illegal immigrants are generally quite clever at remaining undetected. The fact that no one can reasonably claim to be able to tell the difference between those who are here legally and those who are not just by looking is simply an excuse to treat all people of a different skin color or national origin as criminals.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
Death and dying are not easy topics to talk about, but discussing them with your doctor is a good idea. That, in brief, is what new Medicare regulations set to go into effect Jan. 1 are saying. The rules allow doctors to get reimbursed for holding voluntary end-of-life discussions with patients during annual checkups. Not so long ago such end of life discussions were pilloried by Republicans and a few Democrats as a precursor to "death panels" — groups supposedly created by the health care reform legislation being considered at the time that would decide whether the elderly or infirm should be able to get needed medical care.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
WASHINGTON - Elaine Showalter is pursued by tired people.She began to suspect she had a serious problem after an appearance on a Washington television station. A doctor she had debated on an interview show caught her on the way out, told her she hoped her life would be ruined, her career wrecked, then added: "We're going to rip you to shreds."The physician had come on the show to argue the medical validity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome -- which is to say, that it has a biological cause. One of the points of Showalter's new book, "Hystories," is that it doesn't, that it is a form of hysteria.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | December 3, 2005
You'd think the Phillies would have waited to let the hysteria die down over the Sal Fasano signing before announcing Tom Gordon's deal. He's a quality backup, and the equivalent of an extra coach, with surprising power and the ability to call a good game and work with young pitchers.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," which is based on events of the 1692 Salem witch trials, will close Dignity Players' sixth season. Director Mickey Lund is leading the troupe's largest cast ever assembled in the play, which is often ranked among the top 20 American plays. The production will close DP's 2010 theme of "Crisis of Faith. " At a recent rehearsal, Lund was coping with the logistics of a large ensemble, and working to make Miller's drama "more accessible. " He planned to modernize the dialogue and eliminate accents to bring the work alive.
NEWS
June 22, 2010
Being a proud Baltimore native living in Los Angeles these past 15 years, I was surprised, outraged and down right flabbergasted by all the ridiculous hyperbole surrounding the new 2 cent bottle tax. I laughed aloud when I read that Councilwoman Helen Holton called it "a dark day for Baltimore" and Councilman Nicholas D'Adamo said he was "ashamed" to be on the council. Grow up, children! These comments show just how juvenile and petty elected officials can be. I particularly enjoyed a comment in The Sun earlier in the week where a councilman said that the tax (then 4 cents)
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