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Hysterectomy

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By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Sharon Baker says she didn't really mind having her hysterectomy televised for a group of visiting obstetrician-gynecologists, so long as they didn't know who she was.There was little chance that they'd be able to identify her.What the doctors saw on the color TV screen in the Carroll County General Hospital cafeteria was a tan uterus, some yellow bowel, some dark red blood and tiny metal instruments.The TV was set up for two demonstrations of a new hysterectomy technique devised by local obstetricians-gynecologists Samuel Ahn and Paul Vietz in cooperation with German physician Kurt Semm, a pioneer in surgeries using laparoscopes.
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NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,Tribune Newspapers | April 21, 2009
Women who have healthy ovaries removed when they have a hysterectomy face a higher risk of death, including from coronary heart disease and lung cancer, than those who keep their ovaries, new research shows. The finding, from a study published in the May issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, challenges conventional wisdom that removing ovaries along with the uterus offers the best chance for long-term survival. Doctors have recommended for decades that women who get a hysterectomy consider having both ovaries removed - a surgical procedure called a bilateral oophorectomy - to prevent ovarian cancer later in life.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 8, 1992
Women who undergo hysterectomies for the removal of benign ovarian cysts experience five times the number of complications as women who have the same diagnosis but no hysterectomy, researchers report in today's Journal of Women's Health.For more than a decade, physicians have debated whether the benefits of hysterectomy -- the second most common surgery performed in the United States (Cesarean section is first) -- outweigh the risks for certain gynecological problems.The study details the obvious risks of the surgery for the removal of benign tumors while the benefits remain unproven, said one of the study's authors, Dr. Joseph Gambone, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | August 12, 2005
California researchers dropped a bombshell when they reported that the routine practice of taking out a woman's ovaries during surgery to remove the uterus not only has no clear health benefit, but actually raises the risk of death from heart disease and hip fracture. "We've been saying this for a long time," said Judy Norsigian, executive director of Our Bodies, Ourselves, a nonprofit women's health advocacy group in Boston. "There never was any good evidence that taking out ovaries was a good idea, yet doctors did it anyway."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
The pain and bleeding was so bad the last year that she would have had a hysterectomy even if it meant the standard two months of recovery.But three weeks after her doctor removed her uterus using a special instrument, Joan Stickles feels ready to return to her job tomorrow. The three tiny surgical incisions required no more than one staple each and a few Band-Aids the next day, she said."If I'd had a regular hysterectomy, I'd be laid up six to eight weeks," Stickles said. "I'm ecstatic about it."
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | August 23, 1991
The chief of gynecology at Greater Baltimore Medical Center says he is one of a small number of specialists in the country -- estimated at 25 or more -- who are performing a new, less traumatic type of hysterectomy using laparoscopy technology.Dr. James H. Dorsey predicts that the technique, which removes the uterus through the vagina, will become the method of choice in the future, and that traditional hysterectomy through a 5- to 12-inch abdominal incision will rarely be necessary.Dorsey, who in the past has used a lighted tube, or laparoscope, to cut out ovaries, uterine tumors and implants of endometrium that cause infertility in women, has done 20 laparoscopic hysterectomies during the last 18 months.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 8, 1992
Women who undergo hysterectomies for the removal of benign ovarian cysts experience five times the number of complications as women who have the same diagnosis but no hysterectomy, reports today's Journal of Women's Health.For more than a decade, physicians have debated whether the benefits of hysterectomy -- the second most common surgery performed in the United States (Caesarean section is first) -- outweigh the risks for certain gynecological problems.A study discussed in the Journal details obvious risks in surgery for removal of benign tumors while the benefits remain unproven, said one of the study's authors, Dr. Joseph Gambone, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
Fearing their sex lives will deteriorate, many women with painful gynecologic conditions put off hysterectomies. But in the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have found that women's sex lives greatly improve after the operation.The report, published in today's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association, showed that women who had hysterectomies had more sex and that it was more satisfying. And the pain many of these women previously experienced during intercourse disappeared.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
As she entered mid-life, Connie Koller was losing almost a week of every month to her abnormally heavy menstrual periods. Employed full time in the accounting department of Good Samaritan Hospital, trying to keep up with the schedules of three children, the 41-year-old Parkville woman often felt as if she were rushing to plan her life around her periods."
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2003
A Joppatowne woman has filed a malpractice suit against Franklin Square Hospital Center and the doctors she says left a 12 1/2 -by-1 3/4 -inch metal retractor in her pelvis after a routine hysterectomy in December. For seven weeks after her surgery, Brenda L. Monaghan, 40, complained of increasing pain, breathing difficulty and gastrointestinal complications, according to the suit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court. Her doctors, Hanh Tran and Arlene Emmons, prescribed more painkillers and assured her she would soon feel better, the lawsuit said.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2003
Shenna Ross knows she has a high likelihood of developing uterine fibroids. Consider her family history. Ross's grandmother had a hysterectomy at 31 because of uterine fibroids. Her mother had a hysterectomy at 47 for the same reason. Ross, 31, hasn't noticed symptoms yet, but she wants to stay informed in order to avoid having a hysterectomy too. "I need to keep up on the research," says Ross, who lives in Bowie and recently attended a Johns Hopkins Medicine women's health conference.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2003
A Joppatowne woman has filed a malpractice suit against Franklin Square Hospital Center and the doctors she says left a 12 1/2 -by-1 3/4 -inch metal retractor in her pelvis after a routine hysterectomy in December. For seven weeks after her surgery, Brenda L. Monaghan, 40, complained of increasing pain, breathing difficulty and gastrointestinal complications, according to the suit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court. Her doctors, Hanh Tran and Arlene Emmons, prescribed more painkillers and assured her she would soon feel better, the lawsuit said.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
Women who suffer from benign tumors, or fibroids, can now take advantage of a minimally invasive procedure that might significantly cut down on hysterectomies, one of the most common surgeries in women. Using an old technique in a new way, physicians inject tiny particles into blood vessels, blocking the blood flow to the tumors, which gradually shrink and die. About 15 published studies have found good results, including some that show an 80 percent success rate. Women are spreading the word among themselves, often through the Internet.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
Fearing their sex lives will deteriorate, many women with painful gynecologic conditions put off hysterectomies. But in the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have found that women's sex lives greatly improve after the operation.The report, published in today's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association, showed that women who had hysterectomies had more sex and that it was more satisfying. And the pain many of these women previously experienced during intercourse disappeared.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
A traveling health clinic that dispenses free care to the needy in Central Maryland can now offer its patients surgery at a Baltimore hospital.Mission of Mercy, a nonprofit organization based in Emmitsburg, provided free medical and dental care to nearly 10,000 patients at six locations in Maryland and Gettysburg, Pa., this year. A clinic on wheels has its limitations, however.While the mission has arranged for laboratory and X-ray services at Carroll County General Hospital, Frederick Memorial Hospital and St. Agnes HealthCare in Baltimore, surgery for the uninsured poor seemed an impossible task.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
As she entered mid-life, Connie Koller was losing almost a week of every month to her abnormally heavy menstrual periods. Employed full time in the accounting department of Good Samaritan Hospital, trying to keep up with the schedules of three children, the 41-year-old Parkville woman often felt as if she were rushing to plan her life around her periods."
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
New medical technology that has become increasingly popular may get people out of the hospital sooner, but a study says that doesn't mean lower hospital bills.According to the new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, hysterectomies performed with the help of high-tech laparoscopy cost as much as $1,900 more than traditional surgical techniques, even though the newer method allows shorter hospital stays.The study was done at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, which runs the state's largest gynecological surgery service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
It is as easy to call "Rambling Rose" the best American movie in months as it is difficult to say why.Set in Depression-era Georgia, this film hits the viewer with the force of a Peter Taylor short story or a novel by Reynolds Price -- Southern fiction at its Chekhovian best. That is to say that "Rambling Rose" is filled with characters who are at once true to life and people you'd like to know. It seems at first "merely" a good, somewhat leisurely story until, before you know what's happened to you, it reaches deep into your heart.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
New medical technology that has become increasingly popular may get people out of the hospital sooner, but a study says that doesn't mean lower hospital bills.According to the new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, hysterectomies performed with the help of high-tech laparoscopy cost as much as $1,900 more than traditional surgical techniques, even though the newer method allows shorter hospital stays.The study was done at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, which runs the state's largest gynecological surgery service.
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