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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
When a passion for "Game of Thrones" meets up with the kind of inquisitive mind it takes to be a physics grad student at a school like Johns Hopkins University, what you get is the "circumbinary" hypothesis of weird weather seasons in Westeros. Don't mock it unless you have a better explanation as to how "summer can last for decade, winter for a generation" in the fictional world of "Thrones. " I love the kind of intellectual fun these JHU students are having with the the series.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
When a passion for "Game of Thrones" meets up with the kind of inquisitive mind it takes to be a physics grad student at a school like Johns Hopkins University, what you get is the "circumbinary" hypothesis of weird weather seasons in Westeros. Don't mock it unless you have a better explanation as to how "summer can last for decade, winter for a generation" in the fictional world of "Thrones. " I love the kind of intellectual fun these JHU students are having with the the series.
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NEWS
June 14, 1998
The Unified Jazz Ensemble, a quartet that plays at 49 West Coffeehouse in Annapolis, has won a career enhancement award from Billboard Music, the recording and music publishing subsidiary of Billboard magazine.The award, for best instrumental performance of an original piece, was given for "Hypothesis" by its saxophone player, Jeff Antoniuk.The prize is $1,000 and 25 free hours of studio time at Billboard's recording facilities in Oklahoma City.The performance of "Hypothesis" also will be included on a compact disc of winners in Billboard's annual songwriting contest.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 6, 2013
Is the American body politic suffering from an autoimmune disease? The "hygiene hypothesis" is the scientific theory that the rise in asthma and other autoimmune maladies stems from the fact that babies are born into environments that are too clean. Our immune systems need to be properly educated by being exposed early to germs, dirt, whatever. When you consider that for most of human evolutionary history, we were born under shady trees or, if we were lucky, in caves or huts, you can understand how unnatural Lysol-soaked hospitals and microbially baby-proofed homes are. The point is that growing up in a sanitary environment might cause our immune systems to freak out about things that under normal circumstances we'd just shrug off. Hence, goes the theory, the explosion in asthma rates in the industrialized world, the rise in peanut and wheat allergies and, quite possibly, the spike in autism rates.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 22, 1998
TODAY'S TOPIC FOR young people is: How to Do a School Science Fair Project.So your school is having a science fair! Great! The science fair has long been a favorite educational tool in the American school system, and for a good reason: Your teachers hate you.Ha ha! No, seriously, although a science fair can seem like a big pain, it can help you understand important scientific principles, such as Newton's First Law of Inertia, which states: "A body at rest will remain at rest until 8: 45 p.m. the night before the science fair project is due, at which point the body will come rushing to the body's parents, who are already in their pajamas, and shout, 'I JUST REMEMBERED THE SCIENCE FAIR IS TOMORROW AND WE GOTTA GO TO THE STORE RIGHT NOW!
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
WHAT CAN WE DO about halitosis?Alexis Mason knows. She knows common bad breath is caused by bacteria, which can be killed by mouthwash.The seventh-grader at Chinquapin Middle School used her own saliva, a microscope and a bottle of Listerine to demonstrate. Hers was one of the intriguing exhibits this weekend in the 16th annual Morgan State University science fair.Morgan had a record 210 entries, and the topics were limited only by the students' extraordinarily fertile imaginations.Some of the topics were beyond lay comprehension ("Two Forms of Glutathione Conjugate Transport Protein Residing in Different Subcellular Compartments," by Ethel Morgan, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Grandmothers are more than hugs, cookies and free baby-sitting. According to recent research, they might have played a crucial role in human evolution. That's because in primitive societies, older women provide most of the food their family needs, freeing their grown daughters to have more and healthier children. "Grandmothers raise the rate of baby production," said Kristen Hawkes, an anthropologist at the University of Utah who studies the lifestyles of modern-day hunter-gatherers in Africa and South America.
NEWS
February 15, 1996
Maryland must be competitive in war for jobsYour Feb. 1 editorial, "Third-rate or first-rate," which asked which would Maryland be, was on the mark. Can Marylanddevelop a continuing state policy that is sophisticated and flexible enough to support new business development? Can Maryland initiate a new business development policy that selects and applies precise, realistic development techniques, that supports and attracts business and provides job stability and security? Can Maryland initiate a policy that will have the support of all regions of the state and will support regional opportunities and initiatives?
NEWS
September 30, 2005
Belief systems belong to religion, not science With all the attention being paid to evolution now in The Sun, I think it is important to realize that the word "evolution" really refers to two disparate but related ideas ("Witness says Pa. hurting science education," Sept. 27). The first, natural selection, says that animals born with genetic traits that make them more fit will have more offspring, and thus the environment pushes the population to have certain traits. The second is that all biological species are the result of the action of natural selection on one or a few single-celled ancestors over millions of years, the so-called "origin of the species."
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 6, 2013
Is the American body politic suffering from an autoimmune disease? The "hygiene hypothesis" is the scientific theory that the rise in asthma and other autoimmune maladies stems from the fact that babies are born into environments that are too clean. Our immune systems need to be properly educated by being exposed early to germs, dirt, whatever. When you consider that for most of human evolutionary history, we were born under shady trees or, if we were lucky, in caves or huts, you can understand how unnatural Lysol-soaked hospitals and microbially baby-proofed homes are. The point is that growing up in a sanitary environment might cause our immune systems to freak out about things that under normal circumstances we'd just shrug off. Hence, goes the theory, the explosion in asthma rates in the industrialized world, the rise in peanut and wheat allergies and, quite possibly, the spike in autism rates.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
Belief systems belong to religion, not science With all the attention being paid to evolution now in The Sun, I think it is important to realize that the word "evolution" really refers to two disparate but related ideas ("Witness says Pa. hurting science education," Sept. 27). The first, natural selection, says that animals born with genetic traits that make them more fit will have more offspring, and thus the environment pushes the population to have certain traits. The second is that all biological species are the result of the action of natural selection on one or a few single-celled ancestors over millions of years, the so-called "origin of the species."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Grandmothers are more than hugs, cookies and free baby-sitting. According to recent research, they might have played a crucial role in human evolution. That's because in primitive societies, older women provide most of the food their family needs, freeing their grown daughters to have more and healthier children. "Grandmothers raise the rate of baby production," said Kristen Hawkes, an anthropologist at the University of Utah who studies the lifestyles of modern-day hunter-gatherers in Africa and South America.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
SAVE THE bay? It's time to stop kidding around, and pave the bay -- with oysters, maybe a hundred million dollars worth, just for starters. A few years ago, investing big bucks in bivalves seemed as likely as building a new buggy whip factory. Maryland harvests of 1.5 million bushels in the mid-1980s had fallen to 73,000 bushels a year by the mid-1990s -- less than 1 percent of historic levels. Virginia was worse off. Environmental managers debated "how we could call the bay `restored' without oysters, because it didn't look like they would be part of any comeback," says Mike Hirshfield, science director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Asked to describe the puzzle that has stumped him for 42 years, Enrico Bombieri takes a piece of chalk out of his pocket and scrawls a lengthy series of numbers and symbols on an upright slab of stone.The 57-year-old mathematician, standing in a grassy courtyard outside his office at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, scratches furiously for a minute or so. Soon, he rubs out a few numbers with his finger and writes in new ones.The formula Bombieri works on so compulsively may be the single most important question in mathematics: the 139-year-old conundrum called the Riemann Hypothesis.
NEWS
June 14, 1998
The Unified Jazz Ensemble, a quartet that plays at 49 West Coffeehouse in Annapolis, has won a career enhancement award from Billboard Music, the recording and music publishing subsidiary of Billboard magazine.The award, for best instrumental performance of an original piece, was given for "Hypothesis" by its saxophone player, Jeff Antoniuk.The prize is $1,000 and 25 free hours of studio time at Billboard's recording facilities in Oklahoma City.The performance of "Hypothesis" also will be included on a compact disc of winners in Billboard's annual songwriting contest.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 22, 1998
TODAY'S TOPIC FOR young people is: How to Do a School Science Fair Project.So your school is having a science fair! Great! The science fair has long been a favorite educational tool in the American school system, and for a good reason: Your teachers hate you.Ha ha! No, seriously, although a science fair can seem like a big pain, it can help you understand important scientific principles, such as Newton's First Law of Inertia, which states: "A body at rest will remain at rest until 8: 45 p.m. the night before the science fair project is due, at which point the body will come rushing to the body's parents, who are already in their pajamas, and shout, 'I JUST REMEMBERED THE SCIENCE FAIR IS TOMORROW AND WE GOTTA GO TO THE STORE RIGHT NOW!
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- Unraveling the mystery of the crash of TWA flight 800 is as sophisticated as a high-tech underwater device being shipped to the scene to listen for the electronic beep of the missing flight data recorder.And it's as simple as investigators knocking on doors along the Long Island coastline to ask if anyone saw anything unusual in the sky.Pursuing everything from hunches to twisted hunks of airplane fuselage resting 120 feet under water, investigators have opened their inquiry on seemingly countless fronts in the 48 hours since the 747 airliner apparently exploded and crashed in the ocean nine miles from the shore on Wednesday night.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
Science isn't just for boys anymore.Just ask Laura Smith, an eight-grader at MacArthur Middle School, who took one of the second-place prizes in the Anne Arundel County science fair over the weekend."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1998
Towson High School, 9: 35 a.m. The bell for third period rings, the halls are teeming with humanity, and we're looking for slobs.You know the type: tattered jeans, T-shirts from some sleazy bar with a sophomoric name, sneakers that look like they're used to tap-dance in a mulch pit.Boy, you hate to see teachers looking like that.Right, on this overcast weekday morning, we're visiting area high schools to look for grungy-looking teachers. This is because there is a bill before the House Ways and Means Committee in Annapolis that would mandate a dress code for teachers.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1997
FORT DETRICK -- It almost seems like science fiction: A geneticist sets out to discover why identical sister cells of yeast develop differently -- and comes up with an explanation as to why most people are right-handed.What's more: His answer may advance the search for a cure for cancer.At the moment, however, the route is paved with controversy. The scientist -- Amar Klar, head of a basic research lab at the National Cancer Institute's Frederick campus -- is proposing that genetics causes right-handedness, while many scientists still believe it is environmentally determined.
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