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Hypnosis

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SPORTS
May 17, 1991
The New York Mets, practically out of cures for Mackey Sasser's problems throwing the ball back to the pitcher, are considering hypnosis as a last alternative.To rid himself of the tic (tapping his mitt repeatedly before returning the ball), Sasser has tried throwing from one knee, two knees and standing up and even firing the ball back to the mound."What really troubles me is that very few people recover from this type of problem," general manager Frank Cashen said, citing Dale Murphy as the most famous example of a catcher who couldn't return the ball to the pitcher.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun reporter | July 30, 2007
Summer is the slow season for hypnotists. By June, most weight-loss patients - the profession's bread and butter - have already given up, or else they've successfully harnessed the power of the subconscious mind, shed the extra pounds and beelined for the beach. Which was precisely where Don Patterson hoped to find a new type of client. On the Fourth of July, the Pasadena hypnotist commissioned a banner plane to fly along the Ocean City shore, trailing a sign that read, "End Bridge Fear" - a cryptic slogan to everyone except the untold hundreds of Marylanders who are petrified of driving, and even being driven, over the lofty Bay Bridge.
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FEATURES
By Karen Vanderveen and Karen Vanderveen,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 29, 1993
Read these words very closely. Closer. Closer. You can feel yourself getting tired. Tired. Tired of all the Hollywood-hooey that surrounds hypnosis.Many people think of hypnosis as something that is done to you, like in the movies, with frumpy old Viennese psychiatrists swinging pocket watches.A lot of people are afraid that if they undergo hypnosis, they'll come out of the trance quacking like a duck or tearing off their clothes whenever they hear the number nine.The truth of the matter is that hypnosis is something you can learn to do for yourself, to help yourself.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | August 19, 2005
When Marija Trieschman gave birth to her daughter three years ago, she felt no pain. But it wasn't a drug that helped her cope. She credits hypnosis. Trieschman, a horse trainer who uses herbal remedies and other alternative therapies, began attending twice-a-week hypnotism classes when she was three months pregnant. They were held at the home of a friend trained in a California-based practice known as "HypnoBirthing." At her Harwood home, Trieschman practiced hypnosis on herself every day for six months, and when she finally delivered at Anne Arundel Medical Center, she was able to focus so intently on her breathing that she put the pain aside.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - If American Michael Weiss slips into a dreamlike state during his short or long programs this week in the World Figure Skating Championships, it won't be by accident. Weiss said yesterday, after qualifying for the event at MCI Center, that he uses hypnosis to help him fine-tune his concentration as he prepares to take on the finest skaters in the world. "Hypnosis creates a deep concentration," said Weiss, who comes in as the U.S. champion, but not as the favorite. "When I'm in one of these sessions, it's almost like that state just before you fall asleep.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | August 19, 2005
When Marija Trieschman gave birth to her daughter three years ago, she felt no pain. But it wasn't a drug that helped her cope. She credits hypnosis. Trieschman, a horse trainer who uses herbal remedies and other alternative therapies, began attending twice-a-week hypnotism classes when she was three months pregnant. They were held at the home of a friend trained in a California-based practice known as "HypnoBirthing." At her Harwood home, Trieschman practiced hypnosis on herself every day for six months, and when she finally delivered at Anne Arundel Medical Center, she was able to focus so intently on her breathing that she put the pain aside.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 3, 2003
Fascinated by hypnosis? Intrigued by fire-eating? Amazed by illusions? Then this one's for you. The show "Do You Believe in Magic?" takes place at the Chesapeake Arts Center Saturday. Presented in two acts, the performance features Puck, a Frederick-based magician/illusionist, and Kohl and Company, an Arnold-based comedy troupe. Puck combines classic magic and hypnosis with comedy while Kohl and Company mixes classic vaudeville with fire-eating, magic and musical slapstick. The show is a benefit for the Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firefighters.
NEWS
July 22, 1995
Virginia Tighe Morrow, 72, whose revelation under hypnosis of a past life as a 19th century Irishwoman sparked a 1950s debate over reincarnation and served as the basis for the book and subsequent movie titled "The Search for Bridey Murphy," died July 12 in her suburban Denver home, family members said Thursday. She was married to automobile dealer Hugh Tighe when she met the book's author, Morey Bernstein, at a party. Mr. Bernstein, a local businessman interested in hypnosis and reincarnation, offered to hypnotize her to relieve her allergies.
NEWS
August 15, 2004
Often, doctors fail to observe patients' end-of-life wishes Doctors frequently made end-of-life treatment decisions inconsistent with the stated wishes of their patients, according to a study by California's Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Nearly two of three doctors, when presented with hypothetical cases, did not follow their patients' advance directives -- a written document or oral statement describing the type of treatment a person prefers if he or she becomes too sick to make decisions.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2004
Is it possible for someone to experience a greater endorphin high from exercise than others -- and therefore become more addicted? "Yes, it's possible," says Baltimore-based fitness trainer Glenn Berger. "Everyone's brain chemistry is different." In the same way that speed, strength and endurance vary from athlete to athlete, so too does the body's response to exercise. Individual athletes experience a range of emotions, from deep happiness to a sense of empowerment, when they work out. It's important to note that it generally takes intense, prolonged physical activity to reach an endorphin or "runner's" high.
NEWS
August 15, 2004
Often, doctors fail to observe patients' end-of-life wishes Doctors frequently made end-of-life treatment decisions inconsistent with the stated wishes of their patients, according to a study by California's Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Nearly two of three doctors, when presented with hypothetical cases, did not follow their patients' advance directives -- a written document or oral statement describing the type of treatment a person prefers if he or she becomes too sick to make decisions.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2004
Is it possible for someone to experience a greater endorphin high from exercise than others -- and therefore become more addicted? "Yes, it's possible," says Baltimore-based fitness trainer Glenn Berger. "Everyone's brain chemistry is different." In the same way that speed, strength and endurance vary from athlete to athlete, so too does the body's response to exercise. Individual athletes experience a range of emotions, from deep happiness to a sense of empowerment, when they work out. It's important to note that it generally takes intense, prolonged physical activity to reach an endorphin or "runner's" high.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 3, 2003
Fascinated by hypnosis? Intrigued by fire-eating? Amazed by illusions? Then this one's for you. The show "Do You Believe in Magic?" takes place at the Chesapeake Arts Center Saturday. Presented in two acts, the performance features Puck, a Frederick-based magician/illusionist, and Kohl and Company, an Arnold-based comedy troupe. Puck combines classic magic and hypnosis with comedy while Kohl and Company mixes classic vaudeville with fire-eating, magic and musical slapstick. The show is a benefit for the Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firefighters.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - If American Michael Weiss slips into a dreamlike state during his short or long programs this week in the World Figure Skating Championships, it won't be by accident. Weiss said yesterday, after qualifying for the event at MCI Center, that he uses hypnosis to help him fine-tune his concentration as he prepares to take on the finest skaters in the world. "Hypnosis creates a deep concentration," said Weiss, who comes in as the U.S. champion, but not as the favorite. "When I'm in one of these sessions, it's almost like that state just before you fall asleep.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2002
WHETHER IT'S SCIENCE or a parlor trick is debatable. But, without a doubt, hypnotism is entertainment. The student Business Club at North Carroll High School is tapping into this form of entertainment by sponsoring "The Skylr Experience Comedy Hypnosis Show" as a fund-raiser March 8. The show has been performed at middle and high schools along the East Coast. Tom Davidson, a teacher who advises the Business Club, said he checked with other principals and schools about the show and everyone agreed "it was hilarious, clean and fun."
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | June 25, 2000
When Mike Muller had nine-hour cancer surgery two years ago, he was fishing with his father -- or at least he thought he was. Muller, 64, prepared for the operation with a hypnosis session from Dr. Eleanor D. Laser, a clinical psychotherapist in Chicago specializing in medical hypnosis, hypnotherapy and hypnoanesthesiology. Thanks to hypnosis, Muller says, his recovery time was accelerated, he needed less medication, and his post-surgery pain was more manageable. "People think it's voodoo medicine, and it's not," says the Chicago resident.
NEWS
December 8, 1995
Dr. William Kroger, 89, a pioneer and longtime champion of the medical uses of hypnosis, died Monday in Los Angeles. He specialized in obstetrics, gynecology and endocrinology until he became intrigued by the psychosomatic causes of many illnesses he encountered. His interest led him to become a psychiatrist and to use hypnosis to deal with the psychological components of many disorders, particularly the pain of childbirth.At a time when hypnosis was regarded as little more than a potentially dangerous parlor trick, his writings and demonstrations gradually won the confidence of the medical establishment.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
James A. Roday, a prestidigitator and mentalist who used hypnosis to help people stop smoking, control their weight and reduce nervous tension, died of cancer Saturday at Franklin Square Hospital. The lifelong Dundalk resident was 61.At his death he was also a data processing supervisor in the Maryland Department of Social Services, where he had worked since 1990. He previously worked for USF&G and Commercial Credit Corp.In May, he and a son, Timothy Roday of Dundalk, opened the Baltimore Better Life Hypnosis Center in Dundalk, where he treated clients who often were referred by doctors and dentists.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
James A. Roday, a prestidigitator and mentalist who used hypnosis to help people stop smoking, control their weight and reduce nervous tension, died of cancer Saturday at Franklin Square Hospital. The lifelong Dundalk resident was 61.At his death he was also a data processing supervisor in the Maryland Department of Social Services, where he had worked since 1990. He previously worked for USF&G and Commercial Credit Corp.In May, he and a son, Timothy Roday of Dundalk, opened the Baltimore Better Life Hypnosis Center in Dundalk, where he treated clients who often were referred by doctors and dentists.
NEWS
December 8, 1995
Dr. William Kroger, 89, a pioneer and longtime champion of the medical uses of hypnosis, died Monday in Los Angeles. He specialized in obstetrics, gynecology and endocrinology until he became intrigued by the psychosomatic causes of many illnesses he encountered. His interest led him to become a psychiatrist and to use hypnosis to deal with the psychological components of many disorders, particularly the pain of childbirth.At a time when hypnosis was regarded as little more than a potentially dangerous parlor trick, his writings and demonstrations gradually won the confidence of the medical establishment.
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