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Hypertension

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NEWS
By Melissa Healey and Melissa Healey,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2006
Ponder this after recalling how you enjoyed - if you were off work to enjoy - a few extra hours of leisure this Labor Day: Workers may be a nation's lifeblood, but when too many work too much, the nation's blood pressure will rise. Combing through a survey of Californians, researchers at the University of California, Irvine have established a long-suspected link between work and health in America - that people who put in long hours on the job are more likely to suffer from hypertension than those who work less.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 8, 2014
If you are looking to drop pounds, the DASH diet is probably your best choice and Paleo your worst, according to rankings by U.S. News and World Report. The magazine lauded the DASH diet, which was created to fight hypertension, as being easy to follow and safe and nutritious. The Paleo diet says people should eat like cavemen with meals that include very pure meats and wild plants. Sounds good on paper, experts hired by U.S. News & World Report said, but the diet is hard to follow.
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NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
Nine years ago high blood pressure killed Barbara McKinney's parents. Four years ago, it took her sister.Now the 41-year-old Lexington Terrace resident is suffering from hypertension, or high blood pressure, a disease that afflicts many in her West Baltimore community. Like others, she finds it DTC difficult to control her illness, which untreated can lead to heart disease and strokes."We'd like to be on a nutritious diet but that's not feasible on a fixed income," said Ms. McKinney, whose high blood pressure was diagnosed four years ago. Despite her doctor's orders to reduce salt and fat intake, she continues her regimen of eggs and bacon, fried chicken and seasoned salt.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Despite dramatic progress in reducing Americans' exposure to lead over the past 25 years, a growing body of research finds that children and adults still face health risks from even very low levels of the toxic metal in their blood. A recent government study, prepared with help of researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, tallies the wide-ranging damage low-level lead exposure can do, beyond the well-documented effects of reducing youngsters' IQ and undermining their ability to learn and control their behavior.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | September 14, 1990
A hormone that is indistinguishable from a plant extract used to make poison darts in South America and Africa appears to play a key role in the development of high blood pressure, a team of scientists said yesterday.Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Upjohn Co. said the discovery could lead to a diagnostic test for hypertension -- a condition that affects an estimated 60 million Americans -- as well as drugs capable of blocking the hormone's activity.During eight years of investigation, the scientists detected the hormone not only in human blood but also in every mammal they studied -- including dogs, cats, rats, sheep, pigs and cows.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | February 6, 1991
In a study that is sure to fan an age-old scientific debate, Johns Hopkins researchers have attributed the high rates of hypertension among blacks to the stresses of living with racism, poverty and low educational levels -- not to genes.The scientists did not entirely dismiss a genetic link but suggested that stress is the leading reason why blacks suffer disproportionately from high blood pressure -- a disease that is major contributor to heart failure, kidney disease and strokes."We live in a race-conscious society, where darker skin color is probably a marker for exposure to psycho-social stress," Dr. Michael A. Klag, the lead investigator, said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | November 11, 2005
I was surprised to hear that taking acetaminophen daily might lead to elevated blood pressure. Even though I eat a low-fat, vegetarian diet, I am stuck with the family curse - high blood pressure. I take extra-strength pain relievers containing acetaminophen several times a week. Researchers reported in the journal Hypertension (September 2005) that women who regularly rely on more than 500 milligrams of acetaminophen daily almost doubled their risk of developing high blood pressure. Although aspirin was not implicated, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen were associated with higher blood pressure in this study.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | February 6, 1991
Poor, darker-skinned blacks may be more susceptible to high blood pressure than other blacks, says a newly published Johns Hopkins study that relates the racial stresses of being black to hypertension.The study, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, of 437 blacks living in Maryland, Colorado and Georgia suggests that environment -- specifically poverty -- outweighs genetics in determining high blood pressure in blacks.Darker skin color is a marker for greater racial discrimination and that discrimination is stressful enough to induce more hypertension among those without jobs and education, according to Dr. Michael A. Klag, an assistant professor of medicine and the study's lead author.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | March 2, 1997
Patients taking certain calcium channel blockers for hypertension had a higher risk of "cardiovascular events," including stroke and angina, but those on the long-acting calcium channel blockers appeared to suffer no major side effects, according to a new study.Calcium channel blockers, also called calcium antagonists, are the most widely prescribed medicine for high blood pressure.But some studies have linked the drug's short-acting versions -- those that must be taken several times a day -- to increased risk of strokes and heart attacks.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
Physicians are calling for more aggressive treatment of hypertension in black patients, saying that stepped-up medication and a healthier diet can reduce the steep toll that high blood pressure takes on African-Americans. Doctors with the International Society of Hypertension in Blacks say doctors should start black patients on two drugs rather than one, and push exercise, weight loss and a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and fiber. The group, writing in a national medical journal, said doctors should also set out to reduce black patients' blood pressure to a lower level than they would with other groups.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
When people come to the Reisterstown office of Drs. Eickhoff & Rowe for eye exams, the optometrists do more than simply ask which line of letters they can read on the eye chart. Like other eye doctors, James Eickhoff starts with a "complete case history," he said, which includes a rundown of family illnesses. If there's cancer or heart disease in your family, he wants to know about it. Of course, he tests your vision, but the eye exam also includes eye dilation, which allows him to see the back of the retina, where signs of hypertension and diabetes can be detected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Salt is good? Or at least it's not bad. That's what a new meta-analysis in the American Journal of Hypertension finds. Also, a Christian Science perspective on "Millenial foodies" and a recipe for Old Bay fried green tomatoes. Scientific American declares that "It's time to end the war on salt. " It is true that the Fed's new dietary guidelines took the gloves off for salt, even while cushioning its blows to dairy and meat. the Scientific American article refers to a new meta-analysis in the American Journal of Hypertension (that)
NEWS
By Anthony G. Brown | June 24, 2011
Over the last 40 years, Maryland and the entire country have seen groundbreaking advances in the fields of medicine and health care. We have developed life-sustaining treatments for previously fatal diseases, including many types of cancer, HIV, and heart disease. Life expectancy has climbed, and infant mortality has fallen. But these successes are not enough. They are not enough when so many of our accomplishments in health are shadowed by unacceptable disparities. It is not enough that we have new tools for early diabetes detection and kidney care when in Maryland about twice as many blacks suffer from diabetes compared to whites.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
Among the latest no-nos for healthy eating, the federal government said Monday that Americans should consume less salt in an effort to lower their risk of high blood pressure and a host of other chronic diseases. People should limit their intake to about one teaspoon of sodium daily, according to dietary guidelines released from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That figure should be even lower for people 51 and older, African-Americans, or anyone with high blood pressure, diabetes or kidney disease — a group that is about half the U.S. population.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | August 17, 2009
Question: : I was diagnosed recently with borderline hypertension. My internist has prescribed the diuretics HCTZ and spironolactone. My reactions to those have been headache, nausea and intestinal upset. We also have tried Coreg, Norvasc, Accupril and lisinopril. My reaction to those medications has been severe migrainelike headaches. Are there any alternative therapies for treating hypertension? Answer: : There are many ways to treat high blood pressure, but you will need to work with your doctor to make sure the tactics you adopt work for you. As one reader of this column has noted, "losing a little weight (even just 10 pounds)
NEWS
By Gary E. Applebaum | June 16, 2009
President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats have promised to pass sweeping health reform legislation by year's end. But before they overhaul the entire U.S. health care system - and pledge trillions in spending - they ought to consider policies that transcend traditional political divides and have already proven successful. Here's one such policy: improve patient "adherence" to doctor-ordered courses of prescription drugs. In recent years, pharmaceuticals have been integral to improving Americans' health.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
They didn't have jobs or health insurance. Maybe worse, these East Baltimore men felt as if they didn't have anyone to talk to. What most of them didn't realize was that their blood pressure was as out of control as their lives.But a study released yesterday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Dallas has proved that simple steps, and some compassion, can turn around the lives of men whom society has written off."Actually, it's the fact that somebody cares about them," said Mary Roary, the project's director at the Johns Hopkins' Center for Nursing Research.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Va'Sean Duvall is a skinny 17-year-old who stays busy with an after-school job, choir rehearsals and school drama productions. On the surface, he doesn't fit the mold of someone - older, obese and inactive - who would be at risk for high blood pressure. Yet he's among as many as 4 million children in the United States estimated to have hypertension, a figure that has grown fivefold in the past generation, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. It's a condition that doctors often fail to diagnose and one that leaves children - particularly African-Americans - at risk for serious heart problems, says a recent Hopkins study.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | August 12, 2008
Baltimore has launched a citywide effort to educate the public on the dangers of high salt intake, which is associated with high blood pressure, particularly among African-Americans. In a city that is nearly 65 percent black, the risks of hypertension, which can lead to heart attack, kidney failure and stroke, are especially high. The city Health Department is bringing together researchers and public health advocates starting in September to try to untangle the reasons for high salt consumption and offer recommendations for how city officials and food suppliers can decrease it. The six-month-long effort was born out of a recent Health Department initiative to reduce health disparities caused by cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in Baltimore.
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