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Hyperactivity

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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1996
My parents are coming for Thanksgiving and I'm already nervous. Our 9-year-old has ADHD. He is very active and impulsive, but he does well at school with medication. My parents seem to think his behavior at home is a result of poor disciplining on our part and are very harsh with him. He dreads their visits. Any suggestions?Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder have a medical condition that makes it difficult for them to pay attention and to control their behavior. They can be quite a challenge for their families, and it helps to remember that their overactive behavior and impulsiveness are not their fault.
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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
Having trouble concentrating? Can't sit still? Are you disorganized and always late? If so, and if you've always been that way, it might not be a flaw in your personality but a genuine clinical disorder known as adult ADHD. Everyone's heard of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, but left undiagnosed and untreated, it can carry over into adulthood, says Dr. David W. Goodman, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Center of Maryland in Lutherville.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | November 1, 1994
Q: When my son was in third grade, he was diagnosed as hyperactive and given medication, which helped. His doctor still thinks he needs it even though he's 15. I thought kids could outgrow hyperactivity.A: For many years, it was widely believed that children who are hyperactive (now called attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD) would outgrow this behavior problem. It is true that some do and that other teen-agers still have ADHD but have, over the years, learned ways to cope (compensate)
FEATURES
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | June 5, 2008
Spurred on by a successful revolt against artificial food dyes in the United Kingdom, a prominent U.S. food safety advocacy group Tuesday called on federal regulators to ban several colorings, claiming they're linked to hyperactivity in children. Although it may be a long shot - the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rejected such claims - food safety advocates say they hope that by putting a spotlight on the issue, producers will voluntarily drop artificial colors. That's what has been happening in the U.K., as industry giants such as Kraft Foods and Mars have reacted to increasing consumer worries over artificial colors, particularly after a British study bolstered the hyperactivity theory.
NEWS
By Lauren Rooney | December 1, 1999
RITALIN -- Is it a helping hand for children who can't focus, or a fistful of trouble we feed our children every day? Some parents come close to seeing Ritalin as a catchall solution to a myriad of problems, from attention-deficit disorder and hyperactivity to just plain ornery or aggressive behaviors.There are more than 4 million children in the United States on Ritalin. Many people believe Ritalin is safe and effective, and when parents strictly follow the advice of their physicians and counselors, it usually is. But it has a dark side.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1991
DR. WILLIAM Crook's prescription for controlling hyperactivity might read something like this:Take lots of fruits and vegetables, stay away from TV and sugar, get regular doses of outdoor play and family fun, apply vitamins as necessary and warm fuzzies at all times.Only when these remedies do not have the desired effect should you call your pediatrician for another prescription -- for mood-altering medication.Crook, who has been a pediatrician in Jackson, Tenn., for more than 40 years, considers dietary changes the first step toward curbing a child's hyperactivity.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: My son is hyperactive and a friend suggested that this can be caused by an allergy to aspartame. We do let him drink a lot of diet soda so I wonder if he should be tested.A: Many parents of hyperactive children (the term doctors now tend to use is attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity) wonder whether additives in food could be responsible for their children's condition. To date, however, scientists have not been able to establish any clear-cut relationship between these additives and the observed behavior.
NEWS
By RICHARD E. VATZ and LEE S. WEINBERG | September 13, 1992
Does your child's restlessness, disruptiveness, and shor attention span drive you crazy? Do you worry that your child may be "hyperactive;" that is, have a mental "disease," called Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)?Well, you are not alone. But that doesn't mean that your fears are accurate. For about 30 years, many medical and nonmedical researchers have readily agreed -- wrongly and irresponsibly, some say -- that many such children suffer from a mental #F disorder, that their numbers are legion, and that they need to be medicated.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
Researchers have for the first time identified a brain abnormality associated with hyperactivity, the disorder that causes up to 5 percent of children to be restless, inattentive and often disruptive in the classroom.Using a highly sensitive imaging technique to observe the activity of brain cells, psychiatrists from the National Institute of Mental Health found decreased activity in the portions of the brain that are involved in control of attention and motor functions.Their results, to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, "represent a clear advance in our understanding" of hyperactivity, said psychiatrist Gabrielle Weiss of Montreal Children's Hospital in an editorial in the same journal.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 23, 2006
Does sugar make kids hyperactive? Parents of young children never believe this, but the answer, at least according to some experts, is no. The American Academy of Pediatrics, in a book called The Official, Complete Home Reference Guide to Your Child's Nutrition, says that "when put to the test, the sugar-behavior link does not hold up." One study referenced by the doctors' group found "no effect on behavior or the ability to concentrate when sugar intake was far above normal, even among those whom parents identified as `sugar sensitive.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 23, 2006
Does sugar make kids hyperactive? Parents of young children never believe this, but the answer, at least according to some experts, is no. The American Academy of Pediatrics, in a book called The Official, Complete Home Reference Guide to Your Child's Nutrition, says that "when put to the test, the sugar-behavior link does not hold up." One study referenced by the doctors' group found "no effect on behavior or the ability to concentrate when sugar intake was far above normal, even among those whom parents identified as `sugar sensitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | January 31, 2002
Learning how to learn in a different way "Education is one of the most beautiful and liberating things we can pursue in our lives," Jonathan Mooney and David Cole write in the introduction to their book Learning Outside the Lines (Simon & Schuster, $33), "but too often it is approached as a restrictive, punitive, linear, and moralistic act." As for the pursuit of their own education, the authors add, "We needed an unconventional approach that respected our differences and individual goals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 2, 2001
I have a hyperactive mouse on my computer at work. It is on a Compaq 4230 Pentium II PC. And whenever I leave the computer unattended for an hour or so, it is uncontrollable when I come back. The cursor jumps all over the screen, and various boxes appear and disappear randomly. Since I teach school, I am constantly leaving the computer to do something else and coming back to this problem. I have run ScanDisk and defragged the hard drive. I have also disabled sleep mode and the screen saver.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Get your motor running? Michael McCrary's never stops. Like most of the Ravens, the dangerous defensive end gives back to the community, but how many of his teammates have participated in the "Polar Bear Plunge"? That dip into the frigid waters of the Chesapeake Bay benefits the Maryland Special Olympics, one of McCrary's favorite causes. McCrary has gotten his goose bumps off Sandy Point State Park the past three years, but he won't make this winter's event, which is scheduled for Sunday.
NEWS
May 29, 2000
THERE's a lot of controversy surrounding the use of Ritalin to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders in children. That's why the American Pediatric Association's recent guidelines on diagnosing ADHD are such a needed step in better evaluating school-age children with this problem. ADHD itself is controversial. The diagnosis is derived from observations, not blood or brain-imaging tests. About 2.5 million American kids, mostly boys, have been diagnosed with the disorder -- and many doctors prescribe Ritalin to relieve symptoms that include extreme restlessness, an inability to concentrate, impulsive behavior and difficulty sitting still.
NEWS
By Lauren Rooney | December 1, 1999
RITALIN -- Is it a helping hand for children who can't focus, or a fistful of trouble we feed our children every day? Some parents come close to seeing Ritalin as a catchall solution to a myriad of problems, from attention-deficit disorder and hyperactivity to just plain ornery or aggressive behaviors.There are more than 4 million children in the United States on Ritalin. Many people believe Ritalin is safe and effective, and when parents strictly follow the advice of their physicians and counselors, it usually is. But it has a dark side.
SPORTS
By Glenn Nelson and Glenn Nelson,Seattle Times | November 6, 1991
SEATTLE -- Balance, more than anything, is what Quinti Dailey finds when he steps on a scale these days.Rejoining the Seattle SuperSonics this week after a mysterious disappearance last spring, he weighed in at a near-svelte 210 pounds.Yet a scale alone cannot measure the excess baggage Dailey has lost in recent weeks.While being treated for a neurological disorder at a Calabasas, Calif., hospital the past month, Dailey uncovered "a bag of anger so heavy I couldn't even pull it."No wonder.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 26, 1992
The use of Ritalin to calm hyperactive students in Baltimore County fell sharply between 1989 and 1991 after a two-decade climb that provoked an emotional debate and made the county one of the nation's leading consumers of the drug.Writing in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, two doctors with the Baltimore County Department of Health say the decline followed a flurry of media reports that aroused fears over the drug's alleged side effects.Dr. Daniel J. Safer, a psychiatrist with a county mental health center, said yesterday that the drug's popularity peaked, then fell in the late 1980s when media reports publicized concerns about a drug he thinks helped thousands of local children focus on their school work.
NEWS
By Brenda L. Becker and Brenda L. Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1998
Back in Catholic school, when we Baby Boomers sat 45 to a classroom and often two to a desk, most of us behaved so well for the Sisters of Charity that you could hear a pin drop. Most, that is, except George.George lived life with shirt tails, shoelaces and spitballs flying. His knuckles surely had ruler-rapping calluses. He spent most of grade school standing in the corner, where he somehow absorbed enough to go on to higher education and a career as an accountant. We met decades later and reminisced about his days as class clown.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1996
My parents are coming for Thanksgiving and I'm already nervous. Our 9-year-old has ADHD. He is very active and impulsive, but he does well at school with medication. My parents seem to think his behavior at home is a result of poor disciplining on our part and are very harsh with him. He dreads their visits. Any suggestions?Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder have a medical condition that makes it difficult for them to pay attention and to control their behavior. They can be quite a challenge for their families, and it helps to remember that their overactive behavior and impulsiveness are not their fault.
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