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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
STEWARDS of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus have made great strides recently in preserving the best of the area's architectural heritage, but they aren't always looking to the past.Hopkins' newest building, which officially opens tonight, is a boldly modern structure that bears no resemblance to the Victorian landmarks dating to the hospital's founding.Even though it seems to buck recent planning trends at the campus -- such as creating new buildings that look old -- it is entirely appropriate for its setting.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Dr. Raymond Seltser, former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health who was the author of seminal epidemiological articles on smoking, stroke and radiation, died Feb. 16 of pneumonia at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 90. The son of a tailor and a homemaker, Raymond Seltser was born and raised in Boston. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1941. "His parents expected him to go into medicine, but he never wanted to practice," said a son, Barry Jay Seltser of Silver Spring.
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NEWS
October 15, 2000
Advertisements in The Sun this week announced that a series of articles about a project in Nepal by the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health would begin today. However, because of the magnitude and intensity of news from the Middle East, that series is postponed.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Agatha Ann Siegenthaler Rider, who taught and performed research in biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, died Jan. 18 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Morningside Assisted Living House in Ellicott City. She was 84 and had previously lived in Columbia. Born Agatha Ann Siegenthaler in Buffalo in 1919 and known as Aggie, she moved with her family in 1935 to Baltimore, where her father, the Rev. Gottlieb Siegenthaler, was pastor of St. Matthew United Church of Christ until 1960.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
Dr. Morton Kramer, one of the country's first mental health bio-statisticians and a world-renowned authority on scientific psychiatry while at the Johns Hopkins University, died Monday of cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital.Dr. Kramer, 84, of Pikesville was a professor in the School of Hygiene and Public Health at Hopkins from 1976 to 1984, and professor emeritus upon his retirement.From 1949 to 1976, Dr. Kramer was chief of the biometrics division of the National Institute of Mental Health in Rockville.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Agatha Ann Siegenthaler Rider, who taught and performed research in biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, died Jan. 18 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Morningside Assisted Living House in Ellicott City. She was 84 and had previously lived in Columbia. Born Agatha Ann Siegenthaler in Buffalo in 1919 and known as Aggie, she moved with her family in 1935 to Baltimore, where her father, the Rev. Gottlieb Siegenthaler, was pastor of St. Matthew United Church of Christ until 1960.
NEWS
October 18, 1990
Stop smoking! Practice safe sex! Cut down on fat! Each day, public health messages like these bombard Americans in an effort to foster healthier behavior. In other countries, basic health information about family planning, immunizations, safe sex or oral rehydration therapy is the key to saving millions of lives. But around the world, health officials face a similar challenge: How can they get important information to people in a way they can understand and in a way that will actually result in healthier habits?
NEWS
August 2, 1991
In the largest study of its kind, doctors in five cities have found that people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus can delay progression to full-blown AIDS if they take the drug AZT and other medications for a deadly pneumonia.The study involving 2,516 homosexual and bisexual men from Baltimore, Washington, Chicago, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles found that the drugs reduced by 60 percent the chances that an infected person would progress to AIDS in a six-month period.AZT has been in wide usage since 1987.
NEWS
March 23, 1992
Jane Hughes Murnaghan, a retired assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, died Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of cancer. She was 66.Services for Mrs. Murnaghan will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at St. John's Episcopal Church, 3738 Butler Road, Glyndon.She retired in 1979 after working 16 years in the Department of Health Care Organization in the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.In 1964, she and Dr. Paul Talalay published a book, "Drugs in Our Society."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health has && been ranked the best graduate school of its kind in a nationwide survey published this week in U.S. News & World Report.The rating was based on a survey of 50 deans, top administrators and senior faculty members at accredited schools public health across the country. It was conducted by Market Facts Inc., a private research company."We're delighted to be so highly recognized by our colleagues," said Dr. Alfred Sommer, dean of the Hopkins graduate school.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
Dr. Helen Abbey, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor, died Sunday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 85 and lived in Towson. A professor of biostatistics at the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Dr. Abbey taught generations of public health scientists from 1949 until ill health forced her retirement in 1999. She also wrote scholarly articles on medical genetics and chronic diseases. Dr. Abbey was recalled as a teacher who spoke clearly and with enthusiasm for her subject.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2000
Dr. David Edgar Price, a retired physician and Johns Hopkins medical administrator, died Dec. 17 of Parkinson's disease at Vantage House Retirement Home in Columbia. He was 86 and had lived in North Baltimore. In 1967, after a lengthy public health career, he joined the staff of Johns Hopkins as director of planning at the East Baltimore medical institutions. He was also a professor in the School of Hygiene and Public Health. He retired in 1979. "He was an excellent medical planner," said Dr. Richard S. Ross, who was dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine at the time.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Advertisements in The Sun this week announced that a series of articles about a project in Nepal by the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health would begin today. However, because of the magnitude and intensity of news from the Middle East, that series is postponed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
Sam Shapiro, the retired Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health professor whose pioneering research demonstrated that mammograms can reduce women's mortality from breast cancer, died yesterday of cancer at his North Baltimore home. He was 85."He was a giant in the field of public health," said Dr. Alfred Sommer, dean of the Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. "He had a broad steel-trap mind that he used to teach his students how to think."He was a modest, deliberate-speaking man. You could always hear the answer to a question clicking in his head," Dr. Sommer said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
Dr. Lloyd E. Rozeboom, an internationally known authority on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases who also identified many species of the insect, died Sunday from complications of Parkinson's disease at Vantage House in Columbia. He was 91.Dr. Rozeboom formerly lived in Lochearn and Hampstead, Carroll County, before moving to Vantage House in 1992.For more than 40 years, he taught medical entomology at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and studied insects that transmit diseases to humans.
NEWS
May 22, 1999
George J. Weiland Sr., 85, insurance sales managerGeorge J. Weiland Sr., former sales manager for Western and Southern Life Insurance Co. of Cincinnati and a longtime Glen Burnie resident, died Tuesday from complications of a stroke at Carrollwood Care Center in Tampa, Fla. He was 85.Mr. Weiland began his insurance career in Baltimore in 1937 with American Life Insurance Co. of Baltimore, which later merged with Western and Southern. He retired in 1979.The Highlandtown native was educated in Baltimore public schools until he left to help support his family during the Depression.
NEWS
July 15, 1995
Dr. Morton L. LevinEpidemiologistDr. Morton L. Levin, the former Baltimore resident who was among the first epidemiologists to link cigarette smoking to lung cancer, died July 7 of pneumonia at a hospital in Riverhead, N.Y. He was 91.Dr. Levin, who moved from Baltimore to Port Jefferson, N.Y., in 1989, was still a visiting professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, a position he had held since 1967.He began a study of the smoking habits of cancer patients at the Roswell Park Memorial Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1938.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
Dr. Helen Abbey, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor, died Sunday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 85 and lived in Towson. A professor of biostatistics at the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Dr. Abbey taught generations of public health scientists from 1949 until ill health forced her retirement in 1999. She also wrote scholarly articles on medical genetics and chronic diseases. Dr. Abbey was recalled as a teacher who spoke clearly and with enthusiasm for her subject.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Emanuel Kaplan, who was called one of the "Heroes of Public Health" for his efforts to focus national attention on lead poisoning in children and other biochemical and infectious diseases, died Monday of heart failure at his Pikesville residence. He was 89.Dr. Kaplan became intrigued by the high incidence of lead poisoning in children in Baltimore after he joined the city Health Department in 1934.After studying the new dithizone technique for detecting blood lead that was developed by Dupont Chemical Co. and German chemists, the Health Department, under his direction, began a free diagnostic program that assessed the lead levels of anyone suspected of having the disease.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
Dr. Morton Kramer, one of the country's first mental health bio-statisticians and a world-renowned authority on scientific psychiatry while at the Johns Hopkins University, died Monday of cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital.Dr. Kramer, 84, of Pikesville was a professor in the School of Hygiene and Public Health at Hopkins from 1976 to 1984, and professor emeritus upon his retirement.From 1949 to 1976, Dr. Kramer was chief of the biometrics division of the National Institute of Mental Health in Rockville.
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